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Brain Fog


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#61 IrishHeart

 
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Posted 28 June 2011 - 10:21 AM

Have you looked in the Gluten Intolerance and Behaviour Forum? There's loads of stuff there which strengthens the argument for a neurological connection. I've also heard of research on epilepsy which fails to respond to medication but is relieved by a gluten-free diet.



Yes...what she said!!
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"Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is. The way we cope with it makes the difference." Virginia Satir

"The strongest of all warriors are these two - time and patience." Leo Tolstoy

"If you want to lift yourself up, lift up someone else" Booker T. Washington

“If idiots could fly, the sky would be like an airport.”― Laura Davenport 

"Do or do not. There is no try. "-  Yoda.

"LTES"  Gem 2014

 

Misdiagnosed for 25+ years; Finally Diagnosed with Celiac  11/01/10.  Double DQ2 genes. This thing tried to kill me. I view Celiac as a fire breathing dragon --and I have run my sword right through his throat.
I. Win. bliss-smiley-emoticon.gif


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#62 IrishHeart

 
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Posted 01 July 2011 - 02:40 PM

This is from an older post, but you may find it interesting...
Potential Link Between Celiac Disease And Cognitive Decline Discovered By Mayo Clinic
11 Oct 2006

Mayo Clinic researchers have uncovered a new link between celiac disease, a digestive condition triggered by consumption of gluten, and dementia or other forms of cognitive decline. The investigators' case series analysis -- an examination of medical histories of a group of patients with a common problem -- of 13 patients will be published in the October issue of Archives of Neurology.

"There has been very little known about this connection between celiac disease and cognitive decline until now," says Keith Josephs, M.D., Mayo Clinic neurologist and study investigator. "This is the largest case series to date of patients demonstrating cognitive decline within two years of the onset of celiac disease symptom onset or worsening."

Says Joseph Murray, M.D., Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist and study investigator, "There has been a fair amount written before about celiac disease and neurological issues like peripheral neuropathy (nerve problems causing numbness or pain) or balance problems, but this degree of brain problem -- the cognitive decline we've found here -- has not been recognized before. I was not expecting there would be so many celiac disease patients with cognitive decline."

The next step in the research will be to investigate the measure and nature of the connection between the two conditions.

"It's possible it's a chance connection, but given the temporal link between the celiac symptoms starting or worsening and the cognitive decline within a two-year time span, especially the simultaneous occurrence in five patients, this is unlikely a chance connection," says Dr. Josephs. "Also, these patients are relatively young to have dementia."

Theories to explain the connection between celiac disease and cognitive decline include the following, according to Dr. Murray:

* Nutritional deficiency

* Inflammatory cytokines -- chemical messengers of inflammation that could contribute to problems in the brain

* An immune attack on the brain that may occur in some patients with celiac disease

The cognitive decline that occurred in three of the celiac disease patients studied, according to Dr. Josephs, is relatively unique in its reversal in two of the patients and stabilization in one patient. Typically, cognitive decline continues to worsen, he says. "This is key that we may have discovered a reversible form of cognitive impairment," he says.

William Hu, M.D., Ph.D., Mayo Clinic neurology resident and study investigator, says that the reversal or stabilization of the cognitive symptoms in some patients when they underwent gluten withdrawal also argues against chance as an explanation of the link between celiac disease and cognitive decline.

Currently, the investigators do not know which celiac disease patients are at risk for cognitive decline; this deserves future investigation, says Dr. Hu.

Dr. Murray suggests that recognizing and treating celiac disease early will likely prevent most consequences of the disease, including symptoms in the gut or the brain. For celiac disease patients who have already developed cognitive decline, closely following a gluten-free diet may result in some symptom improvement, he says. For those with cognitive decline without a confirmed diagnosis of celiac disease, he does not recommend a gluten-free diet, however.

Physicians can play an important role in keeping alert to a potential celiac disease and cognitive decline connection, says Dr. Hu.

"For patients who come in with atypical forms of dementia, we need to consider checking for celiac disease, especially if the patients have diarrhea, weight loss or a younger age of onset -- under age 70," he says.

To conduct this case series analysis, the researchers identified 13 Mayo Clinic patients with documented cognitive impairment within two years of onset of symptoms or severe exacerbation of adult celiac disease. All celiac disease had been confirmed by small-bowel biopsy, and any patients for whom an alternate cause of cognitive decline could be identified were excluded from the analysis. Patients included five women and eight men, with a median onset of cognitive decline at age 64 that coincided with onset or worsening of symptoms of diarrhea, the presence of excess fat in the stools and abdominal cramping in five patients. The most common reasons for seeking medical help were amnesia, confusion and personality changes. The average score on the Short Test of Mental Status among the 13 patients was 28 out of 38 possible total, indicating moderate cognitive impairment. Ten patients experienced loss of coordination and four experienced symptoms of peripheral neuropathy. Four patients demonstrated deficiency in folate, vitamin B-12, vitamin E or a combination of these deficiencies, although supplementation did not improve the patients' cognitive decline. Three patients' cognitive decline either improved or stabilized when they completely withdrew from gluten consumption. A brain autopsy or biopsy was completed in five patients, and there was no evidence of Alzheimer's disease or any other well-known causes for dementia.
  • 0

"Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is. The way we cope with it makes the difference." Virginia Satir

"The strongest of all warriors are these two - time and patience." Leo Tolstoy

"If you want to lift yourself up, lift up someone else" Booker T. Washington

“If idiots could fly, the sky would be like an airport.”― Laura Davenport 

"Do or do not. There is no try. "-  Yoda.

"LTES"  Gem 2014

 

Misdiagnosed for 25+ years; Finally Diagnosed with Celiac  11/01/10.  Double DQ2 genes. This thing tried to kill me. I view Celiac as a fire breathing dragon --and I have run my sword right through his throat.
I. Win. bliss-smiley-emoticon.gif


#63 Medusa

 
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Posted 02 July 2011 - 07:56 AM

Yes...what she said!! LOL

I mentioned this because my daughter suffers seizures when she has been badly glutened which look like epilepsy (she falls unconcious and cramps violently) but according to the medics are something different as they last too long, up to a few hours at worst. Possibly extreme migraines as she gets a visual aura first. The attacks have continued even after the intial "poisoning" (what else can you call a huge plate of ordinary pasta for school lunch!!!) which put her in hospital, although they have got milder, leading me to believe that some serious neurological damage was done which is hopefully now healing to some extent. A lot of the comments in the behaviour forum rang a bell too.

I certainly didn't mean to be funny.
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#64 IrishHeart

 
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Posted 02 July 2011 - 08:36 AM

I mentioned this because my daughter suffers seizures when she has been badly glutened which look like epilepsy (she falls unconcious and cramps violently) but according to the medics are something different as they last too long, up to a few hours at worst. Possibly extreme migraines as she gets a visual aura first. The attacks have continued even after the intial "poisoning" (what else can you call a huge plate of ordinary pasta for school lunch!!!) which put her in hospital, although they have got milder, leading me to believe that some serious neurological damage was done which is hopefully now healing to some extent. A lot of the comments in the behaviour forum rang a bell too.

I certainly didn't mean to be funny.



No,no... hon, nor did I --Oh gosh, you misunderstood what I meant!! I meant it as an enthusiatic yes!!with a smile ----to what you said --to definitely go to the section on
neurological and behavior issues for more information.

It's an expression here in the States..as in "ditto" to that!..I suffered terribly from this same thing, falling down and semi-conscious and I was only seconding what you sent. "Yes--what she said!!" means I agree... I did not mean it funny either. None of this is very funny--not to me. Gosh, I feel terrible that you thought I meant it that way. My apologies if it came across that way--it certainly was NOT at all my intention. Please accept my humble apology if you were made to feel I was anything but supportive of your suggestion.
  • 0

"Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is. The way we cope with it makes the difference." Virginia Satir

"The strongest of all warriors are these two - time and patience." Leo Tolstoy

"If you want to lift yourself up, lift up someone else" Booker T. Washington

“If idiots could fly, the sky would be like an airport.”― Laura Davenport 

"Do or do not. There is no try. "-  Yoda.

"LTES"  Gem 2014

 

Misdiagnosed for 25+ years; Finally Diagnosed with Celiac  11/01/10.  Double DQ2 genes. This thing tried to kill me. I view Celiac as a fire breathing dragon --and I have run my sword right through his throat.
I. Win. bliss-smiley-emoticon.gif


#65 IrishHeart

 
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Posted 02 July 2011 - 08:37 AM

Yes...what she said!!
Edited by Irishheart.


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"Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is. The way we cope with it makes the difference." Virginia Satir

"The strongest of all warriors are these two - time and patience." Leo Tolstoy

"If you want to lift yourself up, lift up someone else" Booker T. Washington

“If idiots could fly, the sky would be like an airport.”― Laura Davenport 

"Do or do not. There is no try. "-  Yoda.

"LTES"  Gem 2014

 

Misdiagnosed for 25+ years; Finally Diagnosed with Celiac  11/01/10.  Double DQ2 genes. This thing tried to kill me. I view Celiac as a fire breathing dragon --and I have run my sword right through his throat.
I. Win. bliss-smiley-emoticon.gif


#66 Medusa

 
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Posted 02 July 2011 - 11:51 AM

No worries! :) I am so used to people thinking I am a nutter for believing my daughter's neurological symptoms are coeliac related I am probably just horribly over-sensitive! It did occur to me that I should have offered some sort of evidence for my statement - it does sound far out! This is a good summary:

http://epilepsyfound...-disease-gluten



You know what they say - the British and the Americans are "two peoples divided by a common language"! ;) Oh help!
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#67 speedy2056

 
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Posted 02 July 2011 - 11:57 AM

Well, my brain fog lifted very quickly when I went on the diet last week. It has returned to a VERY MINOR extent, but nothing anywhere near to what it was before. I got a feeling this is why I'm having some trouble with thinking of words again. The various benefits (no more bloating, better memory, more energy, etc) are all too good to give up, so I won't be going back on gluten any time soon!
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#68 vendeengf

 
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Posted 02 July 2011 - 12:09 PM

Whenever I talk about brain fog and celiac, my husband takes on this skeptical aire and scoffs a bit (well, a lot really). Tonight, he explained that everytime I mention it, he remembers the movie Joe Vs the Volcano and in particular the scene where Meg Ryan says, "You didn't get a second opinion for something called a "brain cloud?"" He still doesn't quite "get it." I haven't even been gluten-free yet 2 weeks after all. :P

I was hoping to get all of your experiences with brain fog in one place so that I can convieniently share it with him, and maybe he'll take it a little more seriously. ;)

Thanks! :D



hi my name is venessa a brain fog is like a part of ur bain has left u for a little bit if u ask my dad he ur brain goes dead . u need to tell ur husband that its very serios its not good if it happens to much a day u need to get a mri to see if theres calcium on the front of ur brain (my dad does from celiacs ) so it can be very serious
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#69 IrishHeart

 
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Posted 02 July 2011 - 12:35 PM

No worries! :) I am so used to people thinking I am a nutter for believing my daughter's neurological symptoms are coeliac related I am probably just horribly over-sensitive! It did occur to me that I should have offered some sort of evidence for my statement - it does sound far out! This is a good summary:

http://epilepsyfound...-disease-gluten



You know what they say - the British and the Americans are "two peoples divided by a common language"! ;) Oh help!



I do not think you are nutters at all! SEIZURES are listed as a celiac symptom in many sources. I have had my share of doubters in the medical community myself and it makes us a bit "edgy". I do hope you get the answers/help you are looking for.
  • 0

"Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is. The way we cope with it makes the difference." Virginia Satir

"The strongest of all warriors are these two - time and patience." Leo Tolstoy

"If you want to lift yourself up, lift up someone else" Booker T. Washington

“If idiots could fly, the sky would be like an airport.”― Laura Davenport 

"Do or do not. There is no try. "-  Yoda.

"LTES"  Gem 2014

 

Misdiagnosed for 25+ years; Finally Diagnosed with Celiac  11/01/10.  Double DQ2 genes. This thing tried to kill me. I view Celiac as a fire breathing dragon --and I have run my sword right through his throat.
I. Win. bliss-smiley-emoticon.gif


#70 IrishHeart

 
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Posted 03 July 2011 - 02:18 PM

One last thought...and this is something doctors need to understand so patients will be diagnosed quickly from neurological manifestations of gluten intolerance:

"Gluten, as a neuroactive compound derived from the intestinal lumen, can permeate either diseased or healthy mucosa, cross the blood-brain barrier and cause psychiatric, cognitive, and behavioral disturbances".

(Odetti, et.al.1998/ quoted in Recognizing Celiac Disease by Cleo J. Libonati, RN)

That's just one study of many done on cognitive dysfunction and gluten intolerance.
  • 0

"Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is. The way we cope with it makes the difference." Virginia Satir

"The strongest of all warriors are these two - time and patience." Leo Tolstoy

"If you want to lift yourself up, lift up someone else" Booker T. Washington

“If idiots could fly, the sky would be like an airport.”― Laura Davenport 

"Do or do not. There is no try. "-  Yoda.

"LTES"  Gem 2014

 

Misdiagnosed for 25+ years; Finally Diagnosed with Celiac  11/01/10.  Double DQ2 genes. This thing tried to kill me. I view Celiac as a fire breathing dragon --and I have run my sword right through his throat.
I. Win. bliss-smiley-emoticon.gif





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