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How Do You Clean Gluten
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27 posts in this topic

So, your sitting at your house, and some friends or family come over, lots of love and all that good stuff..

BUT

they have biscuts! or some glutteny evil product.

and they touch your stuff!! o.o *terrifying I know

So what do you do.

How do you clean it, I know it makes me a tad crazy =P

but seriously, what is the best way to clean something of gluten?

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I'm wondering the same thing and will be watching this post to find out!!! This happens to me alot with my little one!!

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I would say use canned air (like for the computer). Then I would wipe it down with an alcohol wipe.

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I'm wondering the same thing and will be watching this post to find out!!! This happens to me alot with my little one!!

I remember an older post about this, and someone said Formula 409 is great. I usually wipe down surfaces with vinegar and hot water or (1-3 or 4) or bleach and water using latex gloves. Then I toss the dishcloth in the laundry. (I'm OCD about dishcloths.) Don't you wish you could just send them outside with their gluten? Like smokers? Maybe in 20 years or so, we'll see people standing outside of public buildings eating biscuits. :D

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But isn't gluten a protein? You can get rid of bacteria with vinegar or alcohol but probably not gluten. And you can't kill it with heat--like in baking bread. I would think that the only thing you can do is wash (or wipe) it off. Just my opinion.

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I remember an older post about this, and someone said Formula 409 is great. I usually wipe down surfaces with vinegar and hot water or (1-3 or 4) or bleach and water using latex gloves. Then I toss the dishcloth in the laundry. (I'm OCD about dishcloths.) Don't you wish you could just send them outside with their gluten? Like smokers? Maybe in 20 years or so, we'll see people standing outside of public buildings eating biscuits. :D

oh if only Marilyn!! :lol: and they would have to decontaminate before coming in!!!

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oh if only Marilyn!! :lol: and they would have to decontaminate before coming in!!!

:lol: :lol: I laughed when I read this but honestly it is very close to the truth at my house :ph34r: I live alone (except for my dog and two cats)My whole house (including my pets) is gluten free.

I will not have it in my house. I would not allow someone to bring poison in to my house ,,,,gluten is poison to me .

As to cleaning up after gluten,,,My understand is that plain soap and hot water is best,,,not that you can do that with your remote, :huh:

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Just wipe it really good with a damp cloth and don't ever put it in/near your mouth. Wash you hands well before eating and ask you friends/family (nicely) to wash their hands after eating. My home is gluten-free so they wouldn't be bringing any gluten in anyway. I have however gone so far as to ask my visitors to wash their hands as soon as they come in the door if they are staying for any length of time. I had guests from out of state a few months ago and they told me on the phone that they would pick up fast food on the road and eat it on the way. I asked them to put their fast food trash right in the dumpster outside (I even gave thema trash bag) and to wash their hands and face as soon as they came in the door. Once that was done I gave them a hug and a kiss. We ate gluten-free for the rest of the weekend so I didn't have to worry about any cc risks again.

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We had a Xmas party for the people who work with my hub. It was all gluten-free. One of them brought a cheese ball (likely gluten-free but not in the strictest sense of cc at her house) and a box of Wheat Thins. Hub stopped her at the door, said we are doing gluten-free, we will leave the crackers by the coats & you can take them home. She was cool with that.

For a TV remote, I think you have to use that canned air & then maybe a damp cloth. I used vinengar when I baked with gluten to get it out of cracks. Seems to disolve the gummyness so you can wipe & rinse away. 409 seems to work well, too.

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When I worked in a lab, we used bleach to get rid of proteins on benchtops. I plan on doing this in my home, something equal to chlorox wipes (maybe make my own). Doesn't help for fabric/couches, though. :/

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I use 409 as a general purpose cleaner because it's so handy to use as a spray. I also use a lot of paper towels. On my phones, TV remotes, etc. I like to use rubbing alcohol...not saying that it does anything for gluten but it gets rid of any greasy film. I also use it occasionally on my keyboard for the same reason. I apply it to cosmetic pads and then wipe off the phones, remotes, etc.

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i have a husband who is not affected by gluten and he just really doesn't understand fully what we have to go through

i find gluten all over the place so i have a spray bottle with my fav cleaner and a bucket of water and i just go and wipe everywhere people would touch

it only takes 15 min to do a quick spray wipe chuck cloth in laundry or Lysol wipes work fantastic as well

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Wipe it down with soap and water. 409 and vinegar and stuff aren't really necessary as you can't "kill" gluten, you just have to do a good job wiping it away. You can hit it with 409 but if you haven't done a good job wiping it's still there. Just wipe stuff down often. Avoid having it around in the first place as much as possible.

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I am new to all of this and I read somewhere that gluten can only affect you if consumed and not by touch? So I am unsure now and also about sharing cooking stuff like toaster etc. Surely for cc to happen you have to be extremely severe?

O dear I feel I will never be able to adjust to this new life I have had to enter.

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I am new to all of this and I read somewhere that gluten can only affect you if consumed and not by touch? So I am unsure now and also about sharing cooking stuff like toaster etc. Surely for cc to happen you have to be extremely severe?

O dear I feel I will never be able to adjust to this new life I have had to enter.

It cannot be absorbed through your skin if that is what you are asking, but if someone else eats a sandwich and then touches say your remote, then you touch the remote and eat something after with your hands then you have just gotten glutened fromt touchign the remote. Some people are more sensitive than others but this is a very real scenario. You need to have at the very least a dedicated gluten-free toaster, wooden spoons, non-stick pans (gluten gets in the scratches of old cookware and will contaminate your food), collander/strainer for gluten-free pasta and new cutting board if your current one is wooden or plastic.

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It cannot be absorbed through your skin if that is what you are asking, but if someone else eats a sandwich and then touches say your remote, then you touch the remote and eat something after with your hands then you have just gotten glutened fromt touchign the remote. Some people are more sensitive than others but this is a very real scenario. You need to have at the very least a dedicated gluten-free toaster, wooden spoons, non-stick pans (gluten gets in the scratches of old cookware and will contaminate your food), collander/strainer for gluten-free pasta and new cutting board if your current one is wooden or plastic.

Thank you for the info, so I will sort out my kitchen now and be more aware when eating at my partners. There is more to this than I realised.

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Thank you for the info, so I will sort out my kitchen now and be more aware when eating at my partners. There is more to this than I realised.

You should also ask your partner to brush their teeth and wash their face prior to kissing you if they have been eating gluten or drinking beer. If your partner likes to bake you could be glutened by breathing in airborne flour. Flour goes up in the air and stay there for up to 4 hours. If you are keeping your home mixed one of things your should really eliminate is gluten based flour.

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When I worked in a lab, we used bleach to get rid of proteins on benchtops. I plan on doing this in my home, something equal to chlorox wipes (maybe make my own). Doesn't help for fabric/couches, though. :/

Clorox wipes don't contain any bleach - it's basically some alcohol and quaternary ammonia, both effective antimicrobial compounds. I've been using their Green Works all-purpose cleaner (basically ethanol and some soap) which seems to work quite well. I bought a gallon of concentrate 2 years ago when we bought our house (from a group of smokers) and I reckon I have a 15 year supply left! Clorox lists all of their ingredients and what they are at: http://www.cloroxcsr.com/ingredients-inside/

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My sister-in-law brings gluten treats when she comes to visit and it drives me nuts. But... only 1 (me) out of 3 of us in the house are gluten-free so I try to be understanding but my stomach churns. I spend the entire 3 days she is here following behind with my bottle of spray cleaner and wiping up after everyone. I tend to be rather OCD about gluten anyway so maybe I am over the top with it.

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My sister-in-law brings gluten treats when she comes to visit and it drives me nuts. But... only 1 (me) out of 3 of us in the house are gluten-free so I try to be understanding but my stomach churns. I spend the entire 3 days she is here following behind with my bottle of spray cleaner and wiping up after everyone. I tend to be rather OCD about gluten anyway so maybe I am over the top with it.

I don't think that's over the top at all. I would ask her not to bring them in the future, but that's just me.

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I'm new at this. My daughter has just had a positive blood test. She's still on a regular diet til after her endoscopy on Tuesday. Her blood count was over 100, so doctor is fairly confident the endoscopy will confirm diagnosis. Yesterday, she wolfed down 4 or 5 pieces of regular wheat flour pizzas and didn't even complain of an upset tummy. In the future, after she is on a gluten free diet, and she is accidentally exposed to gluten, will she have a severe reaction? Do all Celiac's become super sensitive to cross contamination? How careful will I have to be to avoid cross contamination? I plan to continue using regular bread and to bake regular goods from scratch for the rest of the family. Help.

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I'm new at this. My daughter has just had a positive blood test. She's still on a regular diet til after her endoscopy on Tuesday. Her blood count was over 100, so doctor is fairly confident the endoscopy will confirm diagnosis. Yesterday, she wolfed down 4 or 5 pieces of regular wheat flour pizzas and didn't even complain of an upset tummy. In the future, after she is on a gluten free diet, and she is accidentally exposed to gluten, will she have a severe reaction? Do all Celiac's become super sensitive to cross contamination? How careful will I have to be to avoid cross contamination? I plan to continue using regular bread and to bake regular goods from scratch for the rest of the family. Help.

Not all celiac's become super-sensitive in their REACTIONS but all celiac's have sensitive immune systems and need to avoid gluten cc. It will NOT be safe for her if you to continue to bake with wheat flour unless you can send your daughter elsewhere for the day. You will need to be careful. If you are cooking both gluten-free and gluten foods, make sure you wash your hands really well before touching her food. Don't use the same spoons to stir gluten and gluten-free dishes. Prepare things on different counter tops, don't share condiments (mayo, peanut butter, jelly, etc) if you are making both gluten-free and wheat bread sandwhiches. You will need to do these basic things EVEN if she is a "silent celiac" and has no reactions to getting trace gluten. You should arrange with your daughter's doctor to have follow up blood testing in 6 months or a year when she has been strictly gluten-free. Her antibodies should go down. If her antibodies don't go down on a gluten-free diet then she has been getting too much cc.

BTW, an upset tummy isn't the only symptom of celiac and symptoms can be delayed by as much as 3 days. So she may have eaten those pizzas and they haven't caused symptoms YET. That doesn't mean she won't get sick later. Other symptoms you can watch for are mood/behavior problems, difficulty focusing, memory problems, headaches, sleeping difficulty/or sleeping too much, muscle or joint pain.

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We take a cloth and wash with soap and water, then put that cloth in the laundry and repeat with another one. A remote is tricky because of all the crevices. I'd not let people touch it with gluten-y hands. When people eat gluten in our house (*rare* because we let people know ahead to please not bring it), we put paper towels down in the area, only eat at the table, and carefully clean up after.

I have a post about getting gluten out of the house, too, btw.

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I wanted to add something cute - a couple weeks ago the kids' friends came over. The kids all came in for snacks after playing outside. My kids were sitting at the table. Their friends looked in their bags, then went and sat on the step outside to eat. I invited them in, and they said - oh, we'll finish out here - we have graham crackers! Even kids can be so considerate!

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I remember an older post about this, and someone said Formula 409 is great. I usually wipe down surfaces with vinegar and hot water or (1-3 or 4) or bleach and water using latex gloves. Then I toss the dishcloth in the laundry. (I'm OCD about dishcloths.) Don't you wish you could just send them outside with their gluten? Like smokers? Maybe in 20 years or so, we'll see people standing outside of public buildings eating biscuits. :D

XD I like that idea

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