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Does Anyone Carry Allergy Or Gluten Cards?


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8 replies to this topic

#1 shayre

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Posted 28 June 2011 - 06:21 PM

I took my kid to play at Monkey Joe's bounce place. I packed gluten-free food for all of us, because they cannot touch it around me or I will get nailed too. I asked them if I could bring in my own food due to allergies. They looked at me like I was the biggest liar! I had to ask 3 different people and a manager several times, but they kept ignoring me. I was persistent about it, so the girl finally admitted that they think that a lot of people lie about allergies in order to bring in their own food. Seriously! So she showed me that they had one option of gluten-free snacks. They were a small pack of these little dried fruit sugary things. I said that's great that you offer that, but there are still problems for me. My youngest can choke on these, and this will not satisfy an appetite for either of my boys...not even close. So, they let me bring in food. I asked her how I can come back and not have the same response from everyone, and she informed me to just tell someone again. Really...so I have to go through the same humiliation again with the dirty stares and smirks! My husband brought up the allergy cards again, and maybe it's a good idea. Where do I get them for gluten and for others. I know that I've heard of gluten cards that you hand to a waiter and chef, so that they may read the rules to keep you safe?
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#2 GlutenFreeManna

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Posted 28 June 2011 - 07:15 PM

I have recently gotten a medical alert bracelet. Mine says: My Name, Multiple severe food alleries, carries epipen and has a contact phone number for emergencies. I made up a little business card with my alleriges listed (I have too many to fit on the bracelet) and wrapped it arround the epipen I keep in my purse. In my case, I felt it was neccessary not to convince people of the seriousness of my allergies but in case I were ever in a car accident or otherwise hurt and unable to tell the hospital staff my food allergies. My husband travels frequently for work so I am often alone and I worry about something happening. I have found a few aquaintaneces that used to try to get me to eat their food raised their eyebrows at it (I think they don't believe life-threatening food allergies are real) but they stopped offering me food finally. I have not called attention to it at a restaurant yet though as I'm afraid they will refuse to serve me. I just make my requests very clear on what I can have and cannot have.

I got mine from Lauren's Hope: http://www.laurenshope.com/
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A simple meal with love is better than a feast where there is hatred. Proverbs 15:17 (CEV)

#3 Darissa

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Posted 28 June 2011 - 08:39 PM

We have a letter from our Pediatric GI doc that states her name with her diagnosis of Celiac and her dietary restrictions. That way, if we run into problems, I do have that letter to show. But mostly, I just email the companies prior to attending the event or activity, tell them the situation, and ask if they can accomidate the gluten free menu, and if not, if I am allowed to bring my own food. I try and email them at least a couple of days to a week in advance so I have time to get a response back. Most places are very accomadating. Sorry you ran into so many problems. Hopefully that won't always be the case. Good luck!
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#4 azgirl5

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Posted 28 June 2011 - 10:03 PM

These are fairly specific to the gluten allergy, but you might check out http://www.celiactravel.com/cards/ for free restaurant cards, or you can order a gluten-free packet which includes a variety of languages (Spanish, Italian, etc)http://www.glutenfre...om/?page_id=151 (bottom of the page).

Hope that helps. Good luck.
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Diagnosed with Celiac after blood test in March 2010.

#5 kareng

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Posted 29 June 2011 - 04:58 AM

I have a note from my doctor. I call places ahead & find out if they need any proof. One place sent me an email to show the security guards at the stadium door. Someplace like the indoor play place, I would just play for my 2 -3 hours & then go somewhere else to eat (a park, home, even the car).
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#6 heatherjane

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Posted 29 June 2011 - 08:04 AM

I use the cards from Triumph Dining and they are wonderful. They have them made up specifically for 10 different types of cuisines and are in both English and the language of country whose cuisine you're eating. Very helpful for ethnic restaurants! They are also laminated and fit into your wallet or purse. Definitely check into getting them...they save you from the hassle of having to go into an hour-long discussion w/ waitstaff.
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#7 mbrookes

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Posted 29 June 2011 - 10:28 AM

Unless Triumph has changed their wording, they may be unnecessarily restrictive. At one time those cards said no vinegar (as in salads) and had a couple of other errors (I don't remember what). Check any cards you get to be sure they accurately reflect your restrictions.
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#8 heatherjane

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Posted 30 June 2011 - 04:31 AM

Unless Triumph has changed their wording, they may be unnecessarily restrictive. At one time those cards said no vinegar (as in salads) and had a couple of other errors (I don't remember what). Check any cards you get to be sure they accurately reflect your restrictions.



I'm looking at the ones in my wallet right now and there's no mention to avoid vinegar other than malt vinegar. I guess you could say they are more conservative (one says to avoid modified food starch), but I don't see anything blatantly incorrect. Honestly, since it's often a gamble with restaurants and what they really put in their food, I'm ok if those cards err on the side of caution. They have been a lifesaver for me and are the best ones I've seen so far. :)
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#9 sariesue

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Posted 02 August 2011 - 09:11 AM

It could also be a against company policy and or a liability if they allow you to bring your own food. If an establishment that serves food allows you to bring in food and you get sick they are liable.

I am new to eating completely gluten-free so please don't get offended by my question. Why didn't the op just plan to go to the bounce place around meal times? Like eat breakfast and go then leave when they were hungry for lunch? Yes, it is an inconvenience not to be able to eat there but it seems minor in comparison to the struggle the OP went through to bring in food. And if it's the disappointment of the kids not being able to have snacks there, why not make a special treat for them to have when you get home?
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