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Enterolab Results - Should I Get Additional Tests Done?


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#1 CJ2011

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Posted 30 June 2011 - 01:42 PM

Hi,

I just got my Enterolab test results. Definitely have issues with the most common allergens. I knew I felt better once I went gluten free despite having a negative celiac test! Anyway, my question to you guys who are much more knowledgeable -- based on the results below should I have other tests done while they still have my specimen? Do I need to do the gluten antibody test -- how is that valuable?

Also, I LOVE eggs! How bad is it to continue eating them with the test result below?

Thank you.

B) Gluten/Antigenic Food Sensitivity Stool/Gene Panel

Fecal Anti-gliadin IgA 108 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)

Fecal Anti-casein (cow’s milk) IgA 21 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)

Fecal Anti-ovalbumin (chicken egg) IgA 11 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)

Fecal Anti-soy IgA 14 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0202

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0301

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (Subtype 2,7)

Interpretation of Fecal Anti-gliadin IgA: The level of intestinal anti-gliadin IgA antibody was elevated, indicative of active dietary gluten sensitivity. For optimal health; resolution or improvement of gluten-induced syndromes (mainly falling into six categories abbreviated as NAAAGS – neuropsychiatric, autoimmune, asthma, abdominal, glandular deficiencies/hyperactivity or skin diseases); resolution of symptoms known to be associated with gluten sensitivity (such as abdominal symptoms - pain, cramping, bloating, gas, diarrhea and/or constipation, chronic headaches, chronic sinus congestion, depression, arthritis, chronic skin problems/rashes, fibromyalgia, and/or chronic fatigue); and prevention of small intestinal damage and malnutrition, osteoporosis, and damage to other tissues (like nerves, brain, joints, muscles, thyroid, pancreas, other glands, skin, liver, spleen, among others), it is recommended that you follow a strict and permanent gluten free diet. As gluten sensitivity is a genetic syndrome, you may want to have your relatives screened as well.

For additional information on result interpretation, as well as educational information on the subject of gluten sensitivity, please see the "FAQ Result Interpretation," "FAQ Gluten/Food Sensitivity," and "Research & Education" links on our EnteroLab.com website.

Interpretation of Fecal Anti-casein (cow’s milk) IgA: Levels of fecal IgA antibody to food antigens greater than or equal to 10 Units are indicative of an immune reaction, and hence immunologic “sensitivity” to that food. It is recommended that for any elevated fecal antibody level to a highly antigenic food such as milk, that it be removed from your diet.

Interpretation of Fecal Anti-ovalbumin (chicken egg) IgA: Levels of fecal IgA antibody to food antigens greater than or equal to 10 Units are indicative of an immune reaction, and hence immunologic “sensitivity” to that food. It is recommended that for any elevated fecal antibody level to a highly antigenic food such as egg, that it be removed from your diet.

Interpretation of Fecal Anti-soy IgA: Levels of fecal IgA antibody to food antigens greater than or equal to 10 Units are indicative of an immune reaction, and hence immunologic “sensitivity” to that food. It is recommended that for any elevated fecal antibody level to a highly antigenic food such as soy, that it be removed from your diet.

Interpretation Of HLA-DQ Testing: Although you do not possess the main HLA-DQB1 genes predisposing to celiac sprue (HLA-DQB1*0201 or HLA-DQB1*0302), HLA gene analysis reveals that you have two copies of a gene that predisposes to gluten sensitivity (any DQ1, DQ2 other than by HLA-DQB1*0201, or DQ3 other than by HLA-DQB1*0302). Furthermore, HLA-DQ2 genes other than by HLA-DQB1*0201 can be associated with celiac sprue in rare cases. Having two copies of a gluten sensitive gene means that each of your parents and all of your children (if you have them) will possess at least one copy of the gene. Two copies also means there is an even stronger predisposition to gluten sensitivity than having one gene and the resultant immunologic gluten sensitivity may be more severe. This test was developed and its performance characteristics determined by the American Red Cross - Northeast Division. It has not been cleared or approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.
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#2 Marilyn R

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Posted 30 June 2011 - 03:57 PM

I can be totally wrong about this. I don't have medical credentials.

If you can eat eggs and feel good, continue eating eggs.

If you eat eggs and feel bad, try to figure out if it is the white (more commonly the allergin) or the yolk. (In my case, it's the yolk.) I still occasionally enjoy gluten-free pancakes or homemode baked items without causing havoc on my system when I have a egg yolk in something baked.

I still have boiled eggs (not as often as I used to, though) and sort of skin the egg white off for tuna salad and lettuce salads. I still have fried egg for breakfast on the weekend. I just eat the white. I have one happy dog since developing an egg yolk allergy. (It popped up in skin prick testing.)


My allergist said it would be good to do an egg challenge. I told him I have enough challenges right now.
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Positive improvement from elimination diet. Mother dx'd by Mayo Clinic in late 1980s. Negative blood tests and Upper & Lower GI biopsy. Parathyroidectomy 12/09. Recurring high calcium level 4/10. Gluten-free 4/10. Soy & Dairy Free 6/10. Corn free 7/10. Grain free except rice 8/10. Legume free 6/11. Fighting the battle of the battle within myself, and I'm going to win!

As of 2/12, tolerating dairy, corn, legumes and some soy, but I limit soy to tamari sauce or modest soy additives. Won't ever try quinoa again!

Discoid Lupus from skin biopsy 2011, discovered 2/12 when picking up medical records. Systemic Lupus Dx 6/12. Shingles 10/12.

#3 stanleymonkey

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Posted 30 June 2011 - 05:29 PM

i'd go with eggs in things first like baked goods. our daughter had IgE tests done and her egg was 1.7 range 0-4, o being not allergic. based on her results she should only have a mild reaction according to the allergist. i had egg salad, washed the spoon and she grabbed it and all it did was touch her chin and she instantly broke out in hives
so numbers aren't always a clear indication of how you will react
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#4 Takala

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Posted 30 June 2011 - 05:42 PM

Fecal Anti-gliadin IgA 108 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)


Not a medical professional, but I do think this says "no ick say on the gluten- ay." ;)
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#5 CJ2011

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Posted 30 June 2011 - 06:33 PM

I can be totally wrong about this. I don't have medical credentials.

If you can eat eggs and feel good, continue eating eggs.

If you eat eggs and feel bad, try to figure out if it is the white (more commonly the allergin) or the yolk. (In my case, it's the yolk.) I still occasionally enjoy gluten-free pancakes or homemode baked items without causing havoc on my system when I have a egg yolk in something baked.

I still have boiled eggs (not as often as I used to, though) and sort of skin the egg white off for tuna salad and lettuce salads. I still have fried egg for breakfast on the weekend. I just eat the white. I have one happy dog since developing an egg yolk allergy. (It popped up in skin prick testing.)


My allergist said it would be good to do an egg challenge. I told him I have enough challenges right now.



I hear ya on having enough challenges! Thanks for your reply....
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#6 CJ2011

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Posted 30 June 2011 - 06:35 PM

Not a medical professional, but I do think this says "no ick say on the gluten- ay." ;)


no doubt! no more gluten for me...so thankful i found this out at a time when gluten free is readily available. ;)
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#7 Mari

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Posted 01 July 2011 - 01:13 PM

You did have a test for autoantibodies to gluten
Fecal Anti-gliadin IgA 108 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)

Gliadin is one of the proteins in gluten. Fragments of gliadin start off the production of antibodies. Your results are quite high. I think this would mean that you have an allergy to wheat and also have non-celiac sprue but do not have autoimmune celiac disease. Non-celiac sprue is one type of gluten sensitivity and some times referred to Leaky Gut Syndrome.
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DQ6/DQ8
HLA-DQ B allele 1 *0602: HLA-DQ B allele 2 *0302
Gluten free and Cow Dairy free since 2006

#8 Skylark

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Posted 01 July 2011 - 01:51 PM

If I were you, I would ask for the anti-TTG from Enterolab if it isn't to expensive. It is a better celiac test than fecal anti-gliadin. I would also ask if they have genetic testing for DQA1 *0505. They didn't last time someone checked, but it can't hurt to ask.

Based on your genetic results it is about 60% likely that you have DQA1 *0505, because you have DQB1 *0301 and they are often inherited together. DQB1 *0202 and DQA1 *0505 combine to make the high-risk celiac gene called DQ2.5 trans. It would be useful to know, because if you have DQ2.5 and gluten intolerance there is a pretty good reason to stay carefully gluten-free.

If you aren't feeling better gluten free, I'd look at casein because MANY celiacs are casein-sensitive. There is no harm in removing soy and eggs from your diet and challenging. IgA testing really isn't very predictive of food intolerance, so you almost always have to check with diet.
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#9 CJ2011

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Posted 02 July 2011 - 12:47 PM

If I were you, I would ask for the anti-TTG from Enterolab if it isn't to expensive. It is a better celiac test than fecal anti-gliadin. I would also ask if they have genetic testing for DQA1 *0505. They didn't last time someone checked, but it can't hurt to ask.

Based on your genetic results it is about 60% likely that you have DQA1 *0505, because you have DQB1 *0301 and they are often inherited together. DQB1 *0202 and DQA1 *0505 combine to make the high-risk celiac gene called DQ2.5 trans. It would be useful to know, because if you have DQ2.5 and gluten intolerance there is a pretty good reason to stay carefully gluten-free.

If you aren't feeling better gluten free, I'd look at casein because MANY celiacs are casein-sensitive. There is no harm in removing soy and eggs from your diet and challenging. IgA testing really isn't very predictive of food intolerance, so you almost always have to check with diet.


Thank you! I have eliminated dairy this week and finally my DH is clearing up!!!! I did a little research and learned that DH is often caused by both gluten and dairy intolerance. I previously had read it was only gluten and didn't understand why it wasn't clearing up now that I'm gluten free. So glad to figure this out...
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#10 CJ2011

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Posted 02 July 2011 - 12:57 PM

If I were you, I would ask for the anti-TTG from Enterolab if it isn't to expensive. It is a better celiac test than fecal anti-gliadin. I would also ask if they have genetic testing for DQA1 *0505. They didn't last time someone checked, but it can't hurt to ask.

Based on your genetic results it is about 60% likely that you have DQA1 *0505, because you have DQB1 *0301 and they are often inherited together. DQB1 *0202 and DQA1 *0505 combine to make the high-risk celiac gene called DQ2.5 trans. It would be useful to know, because if you have DQ2.5 and gluten intolerance there is a pretty good reason to stay carefully gluten-free.

If you aren't feeling better gluten free, I'd look at casein because MANY celiacs are casein-sensitive. There is no harm in removing soy and eggs from your diet and challenging. IgA testing really isn't very predictive of food intolerance, so you almost always have to check with diet.


I also just learned I have autoimmune thryoid disease. Thyroid levels are still fine but I have an enlarged thyroid/benign nodules are present and very high level of thyroid antibodies. I will do the anti-TTG test to determine if gluten is the cause of the autoimmune thyroid disease...
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#11 Skylark

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Posted 02 July 2011 - 01:32 PM

I also just learned I have autoimmune thryoid disease. Thyroid levels are still fine but I have an enlarged thyroid/benign nodules are present and very high level of thyroid antibodies. I will do the anti-TTG test to determine if gluten is the cause of the autoimmune thyroid disease...

Putting together a series of papers, I'm pretty sure that autoimmune thyroid disease is more linked to basic gluten intolerance rather than needing to really be celiac. It's been shown that gluten intolerance produces a cytokine called IL-15 that inflames both gut and thyroid. Also, the selenium deficiency from absorption problems plays into the thyroid inflammation. I've strung together rather a lot of scientific papers to arrive at this conclusion so please forgive me for writing this without citations. It would take me a half hour or more to dig them all out.

This is the most recent one, but it doesn't explain the IL-15 and gluten intolerance connection.
http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/21169670

Also if you do have DH, you need no further testing. Nothing causes that except celiac disease. TTG is still interesting, but probably not necessary.

I'm also really glad to hear going off casein helped you. The diet is sort of a pain (I've done it) but getting your health back is so worth it!
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#12 CJ2011

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Posted 04 July 2011 - 05:35 AM

Putting together a series of papers, I'm pretty sure that autoimmune thyroid disease is more linked to basic gluten intolerance rather than needing to really be celiac. It's been shown that gluten intolerance produces a cytokine called IL-15 that inflames both gut and thyroid. Also, the selenium deficiency from absorption problems plays into the thyroid inflammation. I've strung together rather a lot of scientific papers to arrive at this conclusion so please forgive me for writing this without citations. It would take me a half hour or more to dig them all out.

This is the most recent one, but it doesn't explain the IL-15 and gluten intolerance connection.
http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/21169670

Also if you do have DH, you need no further testing. Nothing causes that except celiac disease. TTG is still interesting, but probably not necessary.

I'm also really glad to hear going off casein helped you. The diet is sort of a pain (I've done it) but getting your health back is so worth it!



Thank you...Please provide links to more of your papers if you can, I would like to read more about this as it is all so new to me.
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#13 CJ2011

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Posted 22 July 2011 - 03:48 PM

Putting together a series of papers, I'm pretty sure that autoimmune thyroid disease is more linked to basic gluten intolerance rather than needing to really be celiac. It's been shown that gluten intolerance produces a cytokine called IL-15 that inflames both gut and thyroid. Also, the selenium deficiency from absorption problems plays into the thyroid inflammation. I've strung together rather a lot of scientific papers to arrive at this conclusion so please forgive me for writing this without citations. It would take me a half hour or more to dig them all out.

This is the most recent one, but it doesn't explain the IL-15 and gluten intolerance connection.
http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/21169670

Also if you do have DH, you need no further testing. Nothing causes that except celiac disease. TTG is still interesting, but probably not necessary.

I'm also really glad to hear going off casein helped you. The diet is sort of a pain (I've done it) but getting your health back is so worth it!



I had the Anti TTG test done and just got the results yesterday....Looks like my autoimmune thryoid disease is all related to autoimmunity triggered by gluten. Results below. Thanks for the suggestion, it has all come full circle now. I will be gluten free for life!

Tissue Transglutaminase Stool Test
Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA 24 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)
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#14 Skylark

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Posted 23 July 2011 - 07:30 AM

Well, I'm sorry you got stuck with our difficult diet but glad to hear you got some answers.
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#15 CJ2011

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Posted 24 July 2011 - 01:29 PM

Well, I'm sorry you got stuck with our difficult diet but glad to hear you got some answers.


Thank you. And I just noticed that you have listed in your signature "bi-polar disorder declared in remission by a suprised psychologist."

I read yesterday that undiagnosed/untreated autoimmune thryoid disease results in people vacillating between hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism (despite what a blood test from any one given day might yield) and so often being misdiagnosed as bipolar! Unreal.
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