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Mri Abnormalities


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17 replies to this topic

#1 AMom2010

 
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Posted 02 July 2011 - 06:49 PM

I am having the celiac panel done later this week, I am really hoping celiac disease is the answer. I was previously evaluated by a neurologist last fall (both my mother and aunt have MS). I had him send me the medical records and his diagnoses upon the intial evaluation were 1) incontinence 2) paresthesia 3) ataxia

After my MRI, lumbar puncture (which was negative for MS), and electrodiagnotistic exam the diagnoses were 1) urinary incontinence 2) abnormal brain MRI 3) tarsal tunnel syndrome

My bladder control issues have really improved (I had a baby 14 mos ago, vaginal birth). He explained my MRI showed 2 or 3 lesions (I can't remember) but there weren't enough lesions to be considered MS. The tarsal tunnel is the equivalent of carpal tunnel in ankles. Paresthesia is the medical term for pins and needles/tingling sensation. Ataxia is trouble with balance, which I have read celiac disease can cause.

He noted "Cranial MRI negative for MS though a couple of T2 abnormalities were noted". Does anyone know what T2 abnormalities may be indicative of? What does this mean?

Thanks for any insight!
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#2 a1956chill

 
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Posted 02 July 2011 - 07:20 PM

I am having the celiac panel done later this week, I am really hoping celiac disease is the answer. I was previously evaluated by a neurologist last fall (both my mother and aunt have MS). I had him send me the medical records and his diagnoses upon the intial evaluation were 1) incontinence 2) paresthesia 3) ataxia

After my MRI, lumbar puncture (which was negative for MS), and electrodiagnotistic exam the diagnoses were 1) urinary incontinence 2) abnormal brain MRI 3) tarsal tunnel syndrome

My bladder control issues have really improved (I had a baby 14 mos ago, vaginal birth). He explained my MRI showed 2 or 3 lesions (I can't remember) but there weren't enough lesions to be considered MS. The tarsal tunnel is the equivalent of carpal tunnel in ankles. Paresthesia is the medical term for pins and needles/tingling sensation. Ataxia is trouble with balance, which I have read celiac disease can cause.

He noted "Cranial MRI negative for MS though a couple of T2 abnormalities were noted". Does anyone know what T2 abnormalities may be indicative of? What does this mean?

Thanks for any insight!

T2 refers to the type of imaging you had (MRI)

T2-weighted MRI
Main article: Spin-spin relaxation time

"T2-weighted scans are another basic type. Like the T1-weighted scan, fat is differentiated from water - but in this case fat shows darker, and water lighter. For example, in the case of cerebral and spinal study, the CSF (cerebrospinal fluid) will be lighter in T2-weighted images. These scans are therefore particularly well suited to imaging edema, with long TE and long TR. Because the spin echo sequence is less susceptible to inhomogeneities in the magnetic field, these images have long been a clinical workhorse."


When I had imaging done there were white spots (for lack of a better description) on my brain.Testing for MS (spinal tap ) was done and came back negative. The diagnosis (at the time )was the white spots were a result of (caused by?) my migraines .
Later I was diagnosed with gluten ataxia .
  • 0

Gluten free Oct/09
Soy free Nov/10

numerous additional intolerances,, i.e. If it tries to kill me I do not eat it .
After 40+ years of misdiagnoses I was diagnosed with:
Dermatitis Herpetiformis : Positive DH biopsy...... Celiac :based on DH biopsy and diet response.

Osteoporosis before  age 50
Hashimoto's thyroiditis disease .

Diagnosed type 2 Diabetes 

Osteoarthritis

Gilbert's Syndrome , confirmed by gene testing


#3 Marz

 
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Posted 03 July 2011 - 03:00 AM

Definitely could be gluten intolerance, especially since MS runs in the family. Seriously - so 2 lesions are "not enough" to diagnose MS? It's not like lesions are normal right?

Anyway, even if the celiac panel comes back negative, I'd highly recommend you try out a strict gluten-free diet for a few weeks, if not a month or so, to see if it helps with the ataxia and other issues. Neurological problems do take longer to clear up than stomach issues, but you may see an improvement early on that will encourage you to try the diet for longer.

You can also try a gluten challenge after a few weeks, if you're feeling better, and see if symptoms come back.

That's the "old-fashioned" way of diagnosing gluten intolerance. To be honest, the bloodwork doesn't always pick up certain gluten intolerance issues, especially the neurological ones. They're aimed at celiac disease, which is a highly specific form of gluten intolerance where gluten antibodies target the intestine. If you feel better off gluten, that's enough proof to never eat it again!
  • 0
Feb 2010 - Start of continuous GIT problems and panic attacks
July 2010 - Blood and biopsy -ve, went gluten free after testing which completely relieved symptoms
July 2011 - 1 year gluten free, food intolerances (Chicken, eggs, olives, goat milk) gone!

2012 - Soy no longer a problem
*************************************************************
Gluten intolerant

#4 Roda

 
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Posted 03 July 2011 - 03:25 AM

Maybe Raven can chime in. I thought she had abnormal lesions show up on an MRI and they were caused by gluten. Might want to get your mother and aunt tested for celiac too.
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Me:
Celiac disease(positive blood work/biopsy- 10/2008), gluten free oat intolerent, Hashimoto's Thyroiditis/Disease, Raynaud's Disease


DS2(age 9):
celiac disease(positive IgA tTG, no biopsy- 11/2010)


DS1(age 13):
repeated negative bloodwork and negative EGD/biopsy. Started on a gluten free trial(8/2011). He has decided to stay gluten free due to all of the improvements he has experienced on the diet.


#5 ravenwoodglass

 
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Posted 03 July 2011 - 03:30 AM

If the lesions are white lesions they are called UBOs or unidentified bright objects. In MS the lesions surround the myelin sheath. In gluten ataxia they are scattered in different places. Those UBOs, in a bit more celiac savvy countries, are diagnostic of celiac disease that is attacking the brain. If my neuro had known this I would have been diagnosed years before I was. Since he didn't I continued to get worse for another 5 years and it took many more years to recover than it likely would have if he had diagnosed me when they were found instead of shrugging his shoulders and telling me they meant nothing.
After you are done with all celiac testing do go gluten free. The parasthesias may get some relief from sublingual B12. In my case it took about 6 months gluten free before I really noticed a difference in my ataxia but I had gotten to the point where I couldn't walk unaided and had a great deal of trouble with speech before I was finally diagnosed. You may notice some difference sooner but be patient. It takes time for the damage to progress and it takes some time to heal the nervous system.
  • 1
Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

#6 a1956chill

 
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Posted 03 July 2011 - 04:19 AM

In addition to going gluten free,I would also encourage you to be cautious of Soy.

My reaction to soy is neurological with a bit of C (constipation)
  • 0

Gluten free Oct/09
Soy free Nov/10

numerous additional intolerances,, i.e. If it tries to kill me I do not eat it .
After 40+ years of misdiagnoses I was diagnosed with:
Dermatitis Herpetiformis : Positive DH biopsy...... Celiac :based on DH biopsy and diet response.

Osteoporosis before  age 50
Hashimoto's thyroiditis disease .

Diagnosed type 2 Diabetes 

Osteoarthritis

Gilbert's Syndrome , confirmed by gene testing


#7 AMom2010

 
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Posted 03 July 2011 - 06:33 AM

Thank you all so much for the wonderful, knowledgable advice!

I have other GI symptoms too. These days it's more constipation, with only occassioanl D. In college I suffered tremenduosly with D regularly until I was at least 25. It was always worse after eating a fatty meal. The last time I had a dish made with cream was at a fancy steakhouse 3 years ago, let's just say before we left my meal had been rectally deposited in the toilet completely undigested (sorry for the TMI). GI symptoms have really improved, I am very careful about what I eat based on bad past experiences, although my diet does still include gluten. Both my maternal grandparents and aunt (the one with MS) have had their gallbladders removed. I've been reading gallbladder disease can be secondary to celiac disease. My grandmother was also always aniemic. Most of my family has GI problems... My younger brother has schizoaffective disorder along with lots of tummy trouble. I have struggled with severe anxiety, bordering on OCD. It all just seems to fit :huh:

What do ya'll think about all my symptoms - gluten intolerance or celiac???

I am now 32, and I was first seen by a neurologist when I was 19, with pretty much the same outcome as the most recent experience...

I would really like to try the gluten-free diet, but I am so worried people (friends and in-laws) will think I am absolutely nuts. Oh well, I guess I need to get over that.
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#8 AMom2010

 
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Posted 03 July 2011 - 07:19 AM

I forgot to add that I have defective tooth enamal, brain fog (oh my gosh it's bad), crazy bad itchy breakouts all over my body (they aren't blisters though), and keratosis plaris. I am also 20 lbs overweight, no matter what I do I can't loose the extra weight. I have twice lost the weight, but it was during my chronic D years...

I am beginning to get gray hair, although I know this isn't a celiac disease symptom, it would be nice if going gluten-free would make the gray go away too, lol!
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#9 mushroom

 
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Posted 03 July 2011 - 08:19 AM

Welcome to the board, Amom2010. Every symptom you mention is highly suspicious for celiac disease. In fact I would be amazed if your tests were not positive. However, just one word of caution: some whose symptoms are primarily neurologic for some reason do not test positive, so if yours come back negative do not believe that your problems are not caused by gluten. Do the diet anyway :)
  • 1
Neroli


"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

------------

Caffeine free 1973
Lactose free 1990
(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's
Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004
Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007
Soy free March 2008
Nightshade free Feb 2009
Citric acid free June 2009
Potato starch free July 2009
(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009
Legume free March 2010
Now tolerant of lactose

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

#10 RollingAlong

 
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Posted 03 July 2011 - 03:26 PM

Did you see this recent study on celiac disease in patients with MS AND their first degree relatives?

http://www.celiaccen...03/vobid--5192/
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#11 AMom2010

 
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Posted 04 July 2011 - 01:15 PM

Yes, Rolling Along, I did see that study and it is what made me look into celiac disease as a cause for my symptoms. I came accross this site while looking for answers for my daughter's steatorrhea. She's 14 months old and had D for a month. I am seriously going to get a plastic shower curtain to put under her crib, it's that bad. Once I began reading about celiac disease I became CONVINCED I have it and that she does as well. Her celiac bw was negative btw. We were referred to a pedi GI and she wanted me to get tested too as she mentioned the bw is useless in little ones.

Mushroom, you mentioned that people with neurological symptoms commonly don't test positive. Were you referring the the bw, biopsy, or both? Just curious.

Thanks!
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#12 mushroom

 
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Posted 04 July 2011 - 01:23 PM

I was referring to the blood work, since most doctors won't do the biopsy with negative blood work. It may also be true of biopsies, which are measuring the GI damage, not damage to the rest of the body from gluten.
  • 1
Neroli


"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

------------

Caffeine free 1973
Lactose free 1990
(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's
Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004
Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007
Soy free March 2008
Nightshade free Feb 2009
Citric acid free June 2009
Potato starch free July 2009
(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009
Legume free March 2010
Now tolerant of lactose

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

#13 AMom2010

 
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Posted 05 July 2011 - 08:54 PM

One more question for all of you (you are so smart)!! Who gives you a diagnosis of gluten ataxia, a neurologist or GI? How exactly is GA diagnosed if bloodwork is negative?

My neuro wanted to follow up with me in Feb, but I never made an appt because nothing had really changed. He also wanted to do another MRI in a year to see if the damage was progressing. This is going to get expensive as we have a awful high deductible plan, have to pay 5000 out of pocket before ins. kicks in. I'm so confused as how to proceed.
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#14 ravenwoodglass

 
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Posted 06 July 2011 - 04:00 AM

One more question for all of you (you are so smart)!! Who gives you a diagnosis of gluten ataxia, a neurologist or GI? How exactly is GA diagnosed if bloodwork is negative?

My neuro wanted to follow up with me in Feb, but I never made an appt because nothing had really changed. He also wanted to do another MRI in a year to see if the damage was progressing. This is going to get expensive as we have a awful high deductible plan, have to pay 5000 out of pocket before ins. kicks in. I'm so confused as how to proceed.


Symptoms and their relief on the diet and the UBO's on an MRI would be what is used for diagnosis. It would be diagnosed by a neurologist but not all are familiar with it.
Once you have been gluten free for a while the ataxia should get some relief. Something that may help you recover quicker is a script for a few visits with a physical therapist. Your GP might be willing to give you one and if the GP knows of your balance issues you could try calling the office and speaking with a nurse to see if the doctor will call in the script to the PT's office so you can avoid the doctor's copay for a visit.
  • 0
Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

#15 a1956chill

 
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Posted 06 July 2011 - 10:44 AM

One more question for all of you (you are so smart)!! Who gives you a diagnosis of gluten ataxia, a neurologist or GI? How exactly is GA diagnosed if bloodwork is negative?

My neuro wanted to follow up with me in Feb, but I never made an appt because nothing had really changed. He also wanted to do another MRI in a year to see if the damage was progressing. This is going to get expensive as we have a awful high deductible plan, have to pay 5000 out of pocket before ins. kicks in. I'm so confused as how to proceed.

My neurologist diagnosed me with ataxia awhile back but did not make the gluten connection until after I was diagnosed with hashimotos and celiacs and I had a lot of my symptoms resolve after going gluten free.
I still have not been able to convince them ( my GI and Neurologist) that soy also causes neurological symptoms for me. <_< ,,


If your blood work comes back positive for celiacs your neurologist needs to have that information,( with the hope he/she is more informed than most .)
Either way I would encourage you to go gluten free after your testing is completed.
  • 0

Gluten free Oct/09
Soy free Nov/10

numerous additional intolerances,, i.e. If it tries to kill me I do not eat it .
After 40+ years of misdiagnoses I was diagnosed with:
Dermatitis Herpetiformis : Positive DH biopsy...... Celiac :based on DH biopsy and diet response.

Osteoporosis before  age 50
Hashimoto's thyroiditis disease .

Diagnosed type 2 Diabetes 

Osteoarthritis

Gilbert's Syndrome , confirmed by gene testing





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