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Heading To Uk
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It looks just like 'normal' bread, it's a bit drier but not at all solid and hard like so many gluten free breads are. when it toasts it almost tastes exactly like normal bread, but you can easily eat it untoasted as well. It's got a slightly starchiness to it but the best thing about it is they got the texture and feel bang on! i hate how gluten free bread is so crumbly. It doesn't last long so it's best to keep in the fridge or better yet frozen. I've only just gone properly gluten free so the taste of normal bread is fresh in my mind but i've tried several brands over here and this one is the best. My sister has celiacs and she gets me to bring it back to her in Canada every time i come home.I'm sorry it's tough to describe it's flavour exactly but it's good..:)

Thanks for the description. The only edible commercial bread I have tried thus far is Udi's (Rudi's not available here). Whilst Udi's is ok it certainly is not exactly enjoyable. In my opinion it is merely a vehicle for toppings - I certainly would not enjoy it on its own. I usually make my own but do look forward to trying Genius.

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Um, what she said! I'm rubbish at describing - and I've never eaten gluten-containing US bread - but the genius bread tastes pretty much like normal, sliced wholewheat bread, I think. At least, how I remember it tasting. It's soft, slightly crumbly but you can make sandwiches and has no weird lingering taste. It's also available in regular supermarkets and is not crazy expensive.

I dragged a bag of groceries around with me on a million trains around england and so my bread wasn't kept in the fridge or frozen, and it lasted fine in the days I had it before using it up. Be gentle with it though - the last few slices got mangled and rather than doing that squashed thing that regular bread does, they shattered into crumbs. But I was throwing that bag all over the place.

Sounds like you put that poor bread through the wringer! :lol: I have tried Schar bread and was so disgusted I spit it out and cried. I tried it again when we were in Europe in May and unfortunately it was not any better. ANYTHING would be an improvement over that icky stuff.

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Sounds like you put that poor bread through the wringer! :lol: I have tried Schar bread and was so disgusted I spit it out and cried. I tried it again when we were in Europe in May and unfortunately it was not any better. ANYTHING would be an improvement over that icky stuff.

Oh dear! I've seen Schar's here but it's extremely expensive so I've never tried it. I'm glad you've saved me the trouble!

And yes, my poor bread! If I'd been at home I would've kept the crumbs but it wasn't worth dragging them around the world :)

Thanks for the description. The only edible commercial bread I have tried thus far is Udi's (Rudi's not available here). Whilst Udi's is ok it certainly is not exactly enjoyable. In my opinion it is merely a vehicle for toppings - I certainly would not enjoy it on its own. I usually make my own but do look forward to trying Genius.

I quite like Udi's, so that might be a bit of a disclaimer. But i know what you mean - it's not exactly something you eat on its own for the enjoyment of it. The Genius bread is softer and more bread-like. With Udi's, I never feel inspired to do anything more than make nutella sandwiches (so, vehicle for the topping, like you said). But with the genius bread, I was making humus, ham and tomato sandwiches. And really enjoying them :-)

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I haven't visited this forum for so long, but I was on yesterday and realized this thread kept going after I left for England. WE had a fabulous time. Weirdly I thought it was easier to eat gluten free in the country-side than London. We stayed a few days in Bakewell, and every restaurant had gluten free options, and advertised them. I wondered if they had a prominent citizen with celiac that raised the awareness. I was just so surprised. Out of Bakewell, we did pretty well in pubs just ordering a steak and chips. But, oy, by the time I got home I never wanted a steak with potatoes again.

London was great. We found a good Indian restaurant by our house that we ate at a couple of times. There was a pasta/Italian restaurant around the corner that advertised gluten free pasta, but when I asked for it the waitress said, "Oh...that takes a 1/2 hour so you need to just order rice." Well, um, okay...maybe don't advertise it if it's such a pain for you. Ironically after dinner my BIL ordered bread pudding and everyone else ordered ice cream or sorbet and we waited 45 minutes for the dessert to come out. The waitress explained it was the bread pudding that took so long. So...I was annoyed at that place. But I got a great grilled sea bass that was delicious. So delicious that everyone wanted to go back and order the sea bass. So, next time I was there and ordered it, it came out with breading.

But other than that we did okay. LOVED Warwick Castle, Hampton Court, Chatsworth House, Haddon Hall, Victoria and Albert Museum. Traveling to London made me realize that Minneapolis (my home town) is really one of the easier cities to live in gluten free. There is a huge awareness here, and even though I mostly make my own food, there are lots of products at the co-op and the local restaurants are pretty accommodating.

OH...one more thing. THe Genius Bread was really good. I did need to toast it and my daughter didn't eat it because she has such a corn allergy. Corn is something I avoid so I wouldn't eat it regularly but it was a nice treat while we were there.

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I guess I'm reviving this thread, but I'm traveling to England next month, and my biggest hesitance about going was whether I'd be lugging a bag of snacks around the country just to keep myself fed. From what I've read, it looks like I won't have to (yay!) Glad to hear that it's probably no worse than trying to eat gluten free while traveling in Canada or the US.

Now I want to go to Warwick Castle, and will hunt down this Genius bread.

If anyone has additional suggestions of where to go, what to eat, or things to avoid in London and elsewhere in the country, that would still be great help.

I'll be in London 3 or 4 days, train-hopping around the country for a few, and in Manchester at least one.

Also, thanks for the links on bringing food aboard planes/across borders, and to gluten-free places in Britain.

Cheerio!

Peg

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