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Heading To Uk


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#16 kareng

 
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Posted 08 July 2011 - 12:50 PM

We're taking the Themes to Hampton Court. I'm VERY excited about that!


We shall require a full report when you return. Unless you want to post everyday? :D
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#17 srall

 
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Posted 08 July 2011 - 01:21 PM

Oh Karen, I think my husband would have my head. I promise I'll give a full report.
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#18 Gemini

 
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Posted 11 July 2011 - 11:19 AM

In addition to Hampton Court I would recommend Leeds.


Another outstanding choice! :D If you want a break from the kiddo's, you can always send them into the maze! :lol:
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#19 love2travel

 
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Posted 11 July 2011 - 12:50 PM

Another outstanding choice! :D If you want a break from the kiddo's, you can always send them into the maze! :lol:

...or even into the moat (I guess lake) if you are desperate! :lol: :lol:

This is rather embarassing but once I got stuck in a maze as an adult at a Scottish castle and came within seconds of missing the last bus of the day back to my B&B. There were some worrisome moments! I could hear the bus but just could not get out of that thing. I was already envisioning hitchhiking back... :P
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<p>Confirmed celiac disease February 2011 from biopsies. Strictly gluten free March 18 2011.Diagnosed with fibromyalgia April 13 2011.3 herniated discs, myofascial pain syndrome, IT band syndrome, 2 rotator cuff injuries - from an accident Dec. 07 - resulting in chronic pain ever since. Degenerative disc disease.Osteoarthritis in back and hips.Chronic insomnia mostly due to chronic pain.Aspartame free May 2011.

When our lives are squeezed by pressure and pain, what comes out is what is inside.

#20 samuella

 
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Posted 14 August 2011 - 11:12 AM

Any report on the trip? We are heading to London in a few weeks and would love to hear how it went for you! :)
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#21 anabananakins

 
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Posted 14 September 2011 - 06:51 PM

Any report on the trip? We are heading to London in a few weeks and would love to hear how it went for you! :)



Samuella, I was in London recently and it is a fabulous place to be gluten free (well, the UK generally I found). All the supermarkets have a big range of foods, all together. I adored the sainsbury's "free from" brownies, but they have heaps of other treats too. Restaurants were always helpful, and I went to a few without researching in advance. Servers knew what I was talking about.

The "Genius" brand of bread tastes like regular bread! I had a gluten free warburtons (sp?) brand sliced bread that was also really nice.

There is a chain called "Giraffe" that has extremely knowledge staff (at least, they were at the two restaurants I ate at). I ate at the one at Heathrow on my way home, and the waiter impressed me so much with his care that I tipped something like 25% and told him why (and tipping on a meal like that really isn't customary in the UK.

I got burgers (no bun) at Gourmet Burger Kitchen. But you can't have the fries.

M&S Food (and you find them at all the big London railway stations) have a big range of salads, grilled chicken etc that is all really well-labelled. The options were so numerous that they totally addled my jetlagged brain (wasn't expecting choice!). The labelling in general is nice and clear.

Let me know if you have any specific questions and enjoy your trip!
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#22 Regameleca

 
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Posted 15 September 2011 - 12:41 PM

Hello all!

I live the uk and it's very good for eating out! Try otto pizza in Notting hill, they do the BEST gluten free cornmeal crust pizza! They say they can't guarantee it's gluten free so they call it "free from gluten" but I've never had a problem! Also Carluccios is a chain of Italian restaurants that offers a huge gluten free menu, they are everywhere. Wahaca is a great mexican chain, they don't have any advice on their menu but are generally helpful if you speak to them.

If you go to Westfield mall in shepards bush they have a lot of restaurants to choose from including wahaca, ooze of risotto (in food court) Pho for..well Pho:p(in food court), busabi eathai for Thai(again no advice on menu but generally helpful in person) and I've heard but not tried that Jamie oliver's italian restaurant can be good! When my sister came over we had dinner there quite often!
They also have an m&s which has gluten-free treats, cakes, bread and over priced sandwiches

Also there is a great shop called planet organic in nottinghill for gluten free goods and another called portobello whole foods on portobello road, which has an amazing Market on sat! Also try cookies (or biscuits ad they are known here) by Kent and fraser! Sold at the above shops... My favourite is lemon shortbread! Amazing! And genius bread!!
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#23 love2travel

 
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Posted 15 September 2011 - 01:29 PM

Samuella, I was in London recently and it is a fabulous place to be gluten free (well, the UK generally I found). All the supermarkets have a big range of foods, all together. I adored the sainsbury's "free from" brownies, but they have heaps of other treats too. Restaurants were always helpful, and I went to a few without researching in advance. Servers knew what I was talking about.

The "Genius" brand of bread tastes like regular bread! I had a gluten free warburtons (sp?) brand sliced bread that was also really nice.

There is a chain called "Giraffe" that has extremely knowledge staff (at least, they were at the two restaurants I ate at). I ate at the one at Heathrow on my way home, and the waiter impressed me so much with his care that I tipped something like 25% and told him why (and tipping on a meal like that really isn't customary in the UK.

I got burgers (no bun) at Gourmet Burger Kitchen. But you can't have the fries.

M&S Food (and you find them at all the big London railway stations) have a big range of salads, grilled chicken etc that is all really well-labelled. The options were so numerous that they totally addled my jetlagged brain (wasn't expecting choice!). The labelling in general is nice and clear.

Let me know if you have any specific questions and enjoy your trip!


Can you please describe Genius bread in detail? I have read about it but want to know what it REALLY tastes like for when we go to the UK.
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<p>Confirmed celiac disease February 2011 from biopsies. Strictly gluten free March 18 2011.Diagnosed with fibromyalgia April 13 2011.3 herniated discs, myofascial pain syndrome, IT band syndrome, 2 rotator cuff injuries - from an accident Dec. 07 - resulting in chronic pain ever since. Degenerative disc disease.Osteoarthritis in back and hips.Chronic insomnia mostly due to chronic pain.Aspartame free May 2011.

When our lives are squeezed by pressure and pain, what comes out is what is inside.

#24 Regameleca

 
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Posted 15 September 2011 - 01:41 PM

Can you please describe Genius bread in detail? I have read about it but want to know what it REALLY tastes like for when we go to the UK.



It looks just like 'normal' bread, it's a bit drier but not at all solid and hard like so many gluten free breads are. when it toasts it almost tastes exactly like normal bread, but you can easily eat it untoasted as well. It's got a slightly starchiness to it but the best thing about it is they got the texture and feel bang on! i hate how gluten free bread is so crumbly. It doesn't last long so it's best to keep in the fridge or better yet frozen. I've only just gone properly gluten free so the taste of normal bread is fresh in my mind but i've tried several brands over here and this one is the best. My sister has celiacs and she gets me to bring it back to her in Canada every time i come home.I'm sorry it's tough to describe it's flavour exactly but it's good..:)
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#25 anabananakins

 
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Posted 15 September 2011 - 03:26 PM

It looks just like 'normal' bread, it's a bit drier but not at all solid and hard like so many gluten free breads are. when it toasts it almost tastes exactly like normal bread, but you can easily eat it untoasted as well. It's got a slightly starchiness to it but the best thing about it is they got the texture and feel bang on! i hate how gluten free bread is so crumbly. It doesn't last long so it's best to keep in the fridge or better yet frozen. I've only just gone properly gluten free so the taste of normal bread is fresh in my mind but i've tried several brands over here and this one is the best. My sister has celiacs and she gets me to bring it back to her in Canada every time i come home.I'm sorry it's tough to describe it's flavour exactly but it's good..:)



Um, what she said! I'm rubbish at describing - and I've never eaten gluten-containing US bread - but the genius bread tastes pretty much like normal, sliced wholewheat bread, I think. At least, how I remember it tasting. It's soft, slightly crumbly but you can make sandwiches and has no weird lingering taste. It's also available in regular supermarkets and is not crazy expensive.

I dragged a bag of groceries around with me on a million trains around england and so my bread wasn't kept in the fridge or frozen, and it lasted fine in the days I had it before using it up. Be gentle with it though - the last few slices got mangled and rather than doing that squashed thing that regular bread does, they shattered into crumbs. But I was throwing that bag all over the place.
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#26 love2travel

 
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Posted 15 September 2011 - 03:30 PM

It looks just like 'normal' bread, it's a bit drier but not at all solid and hard like so many gluten free breads are. when it toasts it almost tastes exactly like normal bread, but you can easily eat it untoasted as well. It's got a slightly starchiness to it but the best thing about it is they got the texture and feel bang on! i hate how gluten free bread is so crumbly. It doesn't last long so it's best to keep in the fridge or better yet frozen. I've only just gone properly gluten free so the taste of normal bread is fresh in my mind but i've tried several brands over here and this one is the best. My sister has celiacs and she gets me to bring it back to her in Canada every time i come home.I'm sorry it's tough to describe it's flavour exactly but it's good..:)

Thanks for the description. The only edible commercial bread I have tried thus far is Udi's (Rudi's not available here). Whilst Udi's is ok it certainly is not exactly enjoyable. In my opinion it is merely a vehicle for toppings - I certainly would not enjoy it on its own. I usually make my own but do look forward to trying Genius.
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<p>Confirmed celiac disease February 2011 from biopsies. Strictly gluten free March 18 2011.Diagnosed with fibromyalgia April 13 2011.3 herniated discs, myofascial pain syndrome, IT band syndrome, 2 rotator cuff injuries - from an accident Dec. 07 - resulting in chronic pain ever since. Degenerative disc disease.Osteoarthritis in back and hips.Chronic insomnia mostly due to chronic pain.Aspartame free May 2011.

When our lives are squeezed by pressure and pain, what comes out is what is inside.

#27 love2travel

 
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Posted 15 September 2011 - 03:32 PM

Um, what she said! I'm rubbish at describing - and I've never eaten gluten-containing US bread - but the genius bread tastes pretty much like normal, sliced wholewheat bread, I think. At least, how I remember it tasting. It's soft, slightly crumbly but you can make sandwiches and has no weird lingering taste. It's also available in regular supermarkets and is not crazy expensive.

I dragged a bag of groceries around with me on a million trains around england and so my bread wasn't kept in the fridge or frozen, and it lasted fine in the days I had it before using it up. Be gentle with it though - the last few slices got mangled and rather than doing that squashed thing that regular bread does, they shattered into crumbs. But I was throwing that bag all over the place.


Sounds like you put that poor bread through the wringer! :lol: I have tried Schar bread and was so disgusted I spit it out and cried. I tried it again when we were in Europe in May and unfortunately it was not any better. ANYTHING would be an improvement over that icky stuff.
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<p>Confirmed celiac disease February 2011 from biopsies. Strictly gluten free March 18 2011.Diagnosed with fibromyalgia April 13 2011.3 herniated discs, myofascial pain syndrome, IT band syndrome, 2 rotator cuff injuries - from an accident Dec. 07 - resulting in chronic pain ever since. Degenerative disc disease.Osteoarthritis in back and hips.Chronic insomnia mostly due to chronic pain.Aspartame free May 2011.

When our lives are squeezed by pressure and pain, what comes out is what is inside.

#28 anabananakins

 
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Posted 18 September 2011 - 08:52 PM

Sounds like you put that poor bread through the wringer! :lol: I have tried Schar bread and was so disgusted I spit it out and cried. I tried it again when we were in Europe in May and unfortunately it was not any better. ANYTHING would be an improvement over that icky stuff.



Oh dear! I've seen Schar's here but it's extremely expensive so I've never tried it. I'm glad you've saved me the trouble!

And yes, my poor bread! If I'd been at home I would've kept the crumbs but it wasn't worth dragging them around the world :)

Thanks for the description. The only edible commercial bread I have tried thus far is Udi's (Rudi's not available here). Whilst Udi's is ok it certainly is not exactly enjoyable. In my opinion it is merely a vehicle for toppings - I certainly would not enjoy it on its own. I usually make my own but do look forward to trying Genius.


I quite like Udi's, so that might be a bit of a disclaimer. But i know what you mean - it's not exactly something you eat on its own for the enjoyment of it. The Genius bread is softer and more bread-like. With Udi's, I never feel inspired to do anything more than make nutella sandwiches (so, vehicle for the topping, like you said). But with the genius bread, I was making humus, ham and tomato sandwiches. And really enjoying them :-)
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#29 srall

 
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Posted 25 September 2011 - 05:14 AM

I haven't visited this forum for so long, but I was on yesterday and realized this thread kept going after I left for England. WE had a fabulous time. Weirdly I thought it was easier to eat gluten free in the country-side than London. We stayed a few days in Bakewell, and every restaurant had gluten free options, and advertised them. I wondered if they had a prominent citizen with celiac that raised the awareness. I was just so surprised. Out of Bakewell, we did pretty well in pubs just ordering a steak and chips. But, oy, by the time I got home I never wanted a steak with potatoes again.
London was great. We found a good Indian restaurant by our house that we ate at a couple of times. There was a pasta/Italian restaurant around the corner that advertised gluten free pasta, but when I asked for it the waitress said, "Oh...that takes a 1/2 hour so you need to just order rice." Well, um, okay...maybe don't advertise it if it's such a pain for you. Ironically after dinner my BIL ordered bread pudding and everyone else ordered ice cream or sorbet and we waited 45 minutes for the dessert to come out. The waitress explained it was the bread pudding that took so long. So...I was annoyed at that place. But I got a great grilled sea bass that was delicious. So delicious that everyone wanted to go back and order the sea bass. So, next time I was there and ordered it, it came out with breading.

But other than that we did okay. LOVED Warwick Castle, Hampton Court, Chatsworth House, Haddon Hall, Victoria and Albert Museum. Traveling to London made me realize that Minneapolis (my home town) is really one of the easier cities to live in gluten free. There is a huge awareness here, and even though I mostly make my own food, there are lots of products at the co-op and the local restaurants are pretty accommodating.

OH...one more thing. THe Genius Bread was really good. I did need to toast it and my daughter didn't eat it because she has such a corn allergy. Corn is something I avoid so I wouldn't eat it regularly but it was a nice treat while we were there.
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#30 Pegleg84

 
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Posted 15 January 2012 - 05:54 PM

I guess I'm reviving this thread, but I'm traveling to England next month, and my biggest hesitance about going was whether I'd be lugging a bag of snacks around the country just to keep myself fed. From what I've read, it looks like I won't have to (yay!) Glad to hear that it's probably no worse than trying to eat gluten free while traveling in Canada or the US.

Now I want to go to Warwick Castle, and will hunt down this Genius bread.

If anyone has additional suggestions of where to go, what to eat, or things to avoid in London and elsewhere in the country, that would still be great help.
I'll be in London 3 or 4 days, train-hopping around the country for a few, and in Manchester at least one.

Also, thanks for the links on bringing food aboard planes/across borders, and to gluten-free places in Britain.

Cheerio!

Peg
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~ Be a light unto yourself. ~ - The Buddha

- Gluten-free since March 2009 (not officially diagnosed, but most likely Celiac). Symptoms have greatly improved or disappeared since.
- Soy intolerant. Dairy free (likely casein intolerant). Problems with eggs, quinoa, brown rice

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