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Opinions On Black Diamond Cheese
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13 posts in this topic

Ok so I walked away with nothing but confusion, after reading that.

I'm not sure if it's one of those... they just can't say it's gluten-free or.. it's CC'd somehow?

I was wondering because I wanted to try

http://www.blackdiamond.ca/#/products/natural/medium-cheddar

the ingredients seem fine?

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First - That post was from 2005. 6 years is a long time in product info.

I eat the cheese because its cheese. As far as I can tell, a cheese factory makes cheese & maybe various dairy products. There is no reason to think there is wheat anywhere near the milk & cheese. Maybe in the breakroom?

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You absolutely do NOT have to worry about cheddar cheese (or pretty much any cheese for that matter). And as kareng has pointed out, you can safely ignore a 6-year-old thread.

richard

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This is in regard to Canadian rules. In Canada, since cheese is naturally gluten-free, it is considered misleading to describe any particular cheese as gluten-free. Only products which might reasonably contain gluten, but in fact do not, can be marketed as "gluten-free." You can say something like: "this cheese, like all cheese, is gluten-free."

ETA: I eat Black Diamond Cheddar regularly.

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As far as I can tell, a cheese factory makes cheese & maybe various dairy products. There is no reason to think there is wheat anywhere near the milk & cheese.

I literally just came across a glutened cheese today for the first time (aside from some super fancy Bleu cheese): beer-washed cheese. :blink:

This is the kind I saw today: http://cheeseandchampagne.com/2010/05/25/new-beer-washed-cheeses-from-keswick-creamery/

I had no idea this even existed! I looked on the web and it looks like ale washed or beer washed cheeses are not from this company alone, although not ever-present, either, thankfully.

Sigh...guess these might be something in the category of 'also processed in a factory that processes wheat,' if a cheese company also makes beer washed cheese.

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I literally just came across a glutened cheese today for the first time (aside from some super fancy Bleu cheese): beer-washed cheese. :blink:

This is the kind I saw today: http://cheeseandchampagne.com/2010/05/25/new-beer-washed-cheeses-from-keswick-creamery/

I had no idea this even existed! I looked on the web and it looks like ale washed or beer washed cheeses are not from this company alone, although not ever-present, either, thankfully.

Sigh...guess these might be something in the category of 'also processed in a factory that processes wheat,' if a cheese company also makes beer washed cheese.

There are some specialty cheeses made with beer. Regular grocery store mass produced is what we were talking about. If it's made with beer, it will proudly state that fact. Only some beers are made with wheat so it might not say wheat. All non- gluten-free beers are made with barley .

My hub came home from a Boy Scout camp out. They had stopped at the Osceola ( Missouri) cheese factory. They make delicious specialty cheeses. He had a cheese with blueberries and a beer cheddar. Oops! He said they were good. :)

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Some gourmet cheeses imported from Europe can contain gluten.

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Some gourmet cheeses imported from Europe can contain gluten.

Can you give some examples? I've never seen these.

richard

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Can you give some examples? I've never seen these.

richard

I cannot recall the brand names (one was French) and we do not have any left in the fridge. Next time I see one I will write it down. They are rare cheeses, though, definitely not available in grocery stores. One I saw was in Italy I think.

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If you're ultra-sensitive, there is the blue cheese question too. Many blue cheeses are 100% naturally gluten free but some artisan cheeses have the mold culture started on bread. There is still no detectable gluten in the finished cheese so even the cheeses with cultures that were started on bread are safe for almost all of us. If you're unlucky enough to react to distilled alcohols or other grain-based products that also have no detectable gluten it's something to be aware of.

This is a fabulous article from the Canadian Celiac Society about blue cheese with the testing.

http://www.glutenfreediet.ca/img/bluecheese.pdf

By the way, I wouldn't hesitate to buy that Black Diamond cheese. I don't even worry about blue cheeses myself after reading that article. I'm not sensitive enough to react to things that test essentially gluten-free. :)

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"This is a fabulous article from the Canadian Celiac Society about blue cheese with the testing.

http://www.glutenfre.../bluecheese.pdf"

Thanks for the article. Bottom line: Canadian celiac society has listed blue cheese as safe for 20 years now. And the testing done for this piece using three highly sensitive tests found NO detectable gluten in 4 brands with a gluten base starter. One of the tests even looks for protein fragments.

Blue cheese simply is not something to worry about.

richard

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Blue cheese simply is not something to worry about.

For most folks, no. However, I am continually amazed by a small group of people on this board whose immune systems do not miss a single molecule of gliadin peptide. These individuals are far more sensitive than an R5 or even a protein fragment ELISA. Rather than providing blanket statements of safety, I think it's better to provide accurate information and let everyone select foods according to their personal levels of sensitivity. B)

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For most folks, no. However, I am continually amazed by a small group of people on this board whose immune systems do not miss a single molecule of gliadin peptide. These individuals are far more sensitive than an R5 or even a protein fragment ELISA. Rather than providing blanket statements of safety, I think it's better to provide accurate information and let everyone select foods according to their personal levels of sensitivity. B)

OK, to be more accurate, blue cheese is considered a safe food by all or nearly all celiac associations and would appear to not be a worry for all but a teeny tiny percentage of people with celiac. Even the most sensitive tests have not been able to detect gluten in blue cheese. If you haven't tried blue cheese since diagnosis, the odds are EXTREMELY high that you can eat it without trouble.

richard

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