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What To Do... What To Do...


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10 replies to this topic

#1 asitis

 
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Posted 15 July 2011 - 08:42 AM

I was diagnosed this week with celiac. It was not expected and I spent the first couple of days in a dazed shock. My husband is extremely supportive, he has been doing research trying to figure out what is allowed and what is forbidden. We did our first shopping trip together and while I was getting frustrated (I desperately wanted to find a gluten free pasta) he remained calm reading all of the ingredients before something went into the cart.

Here is my major delimma. He and I were married about a month ago, it was a destination wedding. Our wedding reception with our family and friends is this weekend, everything has been planned out for a few months. I called the caterer and they do not have a gluten free menu, and they cannot gaurentee that anything on the menu is gluten free. I can't change caterers this close to the reception. I also do not know what to do about the wedding cake, which of course is not gluten free.

Should I just go ahead and eat small amounts that day, knowing what it is doing to me and suffer the consequences that day? Or stick to the sodas, teas, water and ice cream we will have at the reception. I really don't want to bring my own food to the reception, and spend the day explaining to everyone why I am not eating the catered food. I don't mind telling my family and friends I have celiacs, I just don't want my reception to be centered around it.

Any suggestions?
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#2 Jestgar

 
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Posted 15 July 2011 - 08:56 AM

How sick do you get? If you can deal with the consequences, I'd say have a blow out, farewell to gluten weekend.
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#3 loneferret

 
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Posted 15 July 2011 - 09:09 AM

I'd go with Jestgar on this one. One last whoraw...
Enjoy the day, enjoy the family and friends... eat the food.

As for being diagnosed with celiac disease, well:
Welcome to the club, the one you never wanted to join. ;)

[man i love that quote]
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#4 KFritz

 
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Posted 15 July 2011 - 10:39 AM

Hi! I was diagnosed with celiac when I was 3 years old. What I usually do in these situations where I don't have a gluten-free menu is I just eat things that don't have breading on it or things that have flour in them like cake, etc. I wouldn't eat pasta obviously but I think if you don't see any things that could have gluten like meatballs or crabcakes, then eat them. THey most likely have bread crumbs in them for a binding agent but it shouldn't hurt you that much; at least it doesn't hurt me that much. That's always how I work situations like this. Except now I'm severely lactose intolerant so it's harder for me now. But, I hope this advice helps!
-Kate F


I was diagnosed this week with celiac. It was not expected and I spent the first couple of days in a dazed shock. My husband is extremely supportive, he has been doing research trying to figure out what is allowed and what is forbidden. We did our first shopping trip together and while I was getting frustrated (I desperately wanted to find a gluten free pasta) he remained calm reading all of the ingredients before something went into the cart.

Here is my major delimma. He and I were married about a month ago, it was a destination wedding. Our wedding reception with our family and friends is this weekend, everything has been planned out for a few months. I called the caterer and they do not have a gluten free menu, and they cannot gaurentee that anything on the menu is gluten free. I can't change caterers this close to the reception. I also do not know what to do about the wedding cake, which of course is not gluten free.

Should I just go ahead and eat small amounts that day, knowing what it is doing to me and suffer the consequences that day? Or stick to the sodas, teas, water and ice cream we will have at the reception. I really don't want to bring my own food to the reception, and spend the day explaining to everyone why I am not eating the catered food. I don't mind telling my family and friends I have celiacs, I just don't want my reception to be centered around it.

Any suggestions?


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#5 rosetapper23

 
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Posted 15 July 2011 - 10:49 AM

I agree with the others--starting the diet a week late shouldn't make a difference. For many of us, the worst damage occurs after we've been on a gluten-free diet for a long time...and we become super-sensitive to the smallest amounts of gluten. Your body may be currently accustomed to a certain level of gluten, and it may not know the difference. Enjoy your last weekend of gluten--and congratulations on your marriage!

As for shopping for gluten-free food, it'll become easier over time. Personally, I don't trust reading the ingredients because gluten (especially barley gluten) doesn't have to be listed. If I choose to buy a product that doesn't have a gluten-free certification, I use the following list, which includes the "regular" brands at any supermarket--it makes shopping easier when I need to buy something for a recipe, such as enchilada sauce:

http://homepage.mac..../GFfoodlist.pdf

You'll see that you actually have a lot of freedom when it comes to choosing foods. Usually, it's encouraged that people new to the diet stick with only natural foods for a while so that they can avoid cross-contamination and completely heal. It also helps with nutrient absorption to eat "real" food, such as vegetables, fruits, dairy, nuts, meats, etc. You'll be tempted to buy gluten-free processed foods, but over time you'll come to realize that you probably prefer natural foods. A lot of us lose our taste for processed foods after being on a gluten-free, natural diet.
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#6 GlutenFreeManna

 
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Posted 15 July 2011 - 11:18 AM

I'm going to diagree with the others but only because cheating on my gluten-free diet would completely ruin what was supposed to be a fun and happy day for me. If your symptoms are not that bad and you think you can deal with it then ignore my advice and do what you have planned already. That said, if it were me I would have a special gluten-free meal made just for me and the new husband. Guests should understand and since it's YOUR special day you are allowed to have special treatment anyway. Find a local restuarant that has a gluten-free menu and has take out or will deliver. Put someone else in charge of picking up your food so you don't have to worry about it. Just have the food plated in the kitchen and ask one of the catering staff (or a member of the wedidng party) to serve it to you at the head table. For the cake, see if you can find a gluten-free bakery to make a round topper that closely matches the frosting of the cake you already bought OR you could make a "grooms cake" that is gluten-free if you don't have one of those planned already. That way you can put it on a pretty little cake stand cut it and feed to each other and no one would probably even question why you were not eating the main cake. Otherwise if you were not going to do a cake cutting at all you could just have some slices of gluten-free cake with similar frosting in the kitchen or another room and again have someone bring them out to give you. Many weddings do that with the main cake anyway--they have it out for viewing and then take it back to the kitchen to be cut and bring out carts or tables with the slices all nicely put out for people to pick up. I doubt anyone would even notice you were getting special slices of gluten-free cake. Whatever you do I hope you can enjoy the day and not be stressed. Congratulations!
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#7 Cara in Boston

 
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Posted 15 July 2011 - 11:35 AM

Since you have just been diagnosed, waiting until after the weekend to start the diet should be no big deal. However, if you've been gluten-free for a few days and are already feeling better, why suffer the consequences?

We did something similar (destination wedding with reception later at home) and I'm pretty sure I didn't eat much at all at the party - we were so busy spending time with all the guests. The caterers saved us a meal that we ate later. (I wasn't even gluten-free at the time and we were serving my favorite food - lobster. We just never sat down long enough to eat.)

I think that happens a lot with weddings (unless it is a sit down dinner, but even then, the B & G are often up walking around to all the tables . . .) It really wouldn't be a big deal to have a different, separate meal prepared and served to you.

I like the separate cake idea too. The gluten-free bakeries around here make delicious cakes - you wouldn't even know the difference. Who knows, you may even have a guest who would appreciate a gluten-free dessert option.

For pasta: try Ancient Grains Quinoa Pasta - We could barely tell the difference . . .


Congratulations on your wedding -

Cara
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#8 GFinDC

 
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Posted 15 July 2011 - 02:00 PM

Tinkyada is another good gluten-free pasta brand. If you are already gluten-free, then you may have a bad reaction and a miserable honeymoon if you eat a gluten filled meal at the reception. I'd suggest using the 2nd cake (gluten-free) and getting a gluten-free meal some where. Ask the caterer to make you veggies in a clean pot or pan and not to use the same utensils as the other food. If you aren't already gluten-free then a few more days is not likely to matter much. Except for whatever symptoms you have continuing longer.

As far as not making the event about you, it is already about you and your husband and your marriage. It might not be a bad idea to let people know you found out recently you have celiac. It might encourage other people to get tested, especially family members / relatives. Celiac disease is not well understood or know, and educating people is not a bad thing to do. You never know who might be helped by your information.
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Proverbs 25:16 "Hast thou found honey? eat so much as is sufficient for thee, lest thou be filled therewith, and vomit it."
Job 30:27 My bowels boiled, and rested not: the days of affliction prevented me.
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#9 Katrala

 
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Posted 15 July 2011 - 02:22 PM

I agree with others - if you don't have an immediate reaction to gluten that will ruin the day, go ahead and act / eat "normally." Then you can begin your gluten-free diet.

Your wedding and accompanying events is something that you will remember forever. Don't stress yourself out (and possibly become sick from it) by trying to begin a new diet on that exact date. Relax and enjoy yourself.
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#10 asitis

 
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Posted 15 July 2011 - 03:58 PM

Thanks everyone for the replies. We've been working on getting completely gluten free since Monday and I've already noticed some difference, mainly the GI problems and I don't feel as tired. Since it is buffet style I don't think anyone will notice if I don't eat, I can make some rounds at the tables during dinner. Not sure about the cake yet. I think I might go ahead and have a slice since it is the only wedding cake I'll every have that is mine :) The honeymoon will be in December, I am hoping to be more comfortable on the diet by then to not worry as much when we go.

Thank goodness I was diagnosed after the wedding, we went to New Orleans and the food was awesome, and definately not gluten free. LOL.
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#11 MissBonnie

 
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Posted 15 July 2011 - 07:52 PM

Thanks everyone for the replies. We've been working on getting completely gluten free since Monday and I've already noticed some difference, mainly the GI problems and I don't feel as tired. Since it is buffet style I don't think anyone will notice if I don't eat, I can make some rounds at the tables during dinner. Not sure about the cake yet. I think I might go ahead and have a slice since it is the only wedding cake I'll every have that is mine :) The honeymoon will be in December, I am hoping to be more comfortable on the diet by then to not worry as much when we go.

Thank goodness I was diagnosed after the wedding, we went to New Orleans and the food was awesome, and definately not gluten free. LOL.



if it buffet style can you just eat the salad etc? or maybe add some grilled chicken pieces to the menu? as for the cake, i say just have a bite. if your symptoms arent too bad then one bite wont matter too much im assuming. congratulations and remember it does get easier!
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