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Is It True That Celiacs Lack An Enzyme That Protects Our Body/organs From Cancer?
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I have heard this from a woman on another board? And wonder how valid this statement was? Thank you!

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If there was an enzyme that protected people from cancer - only Celiacs would get cancer & researchers would be frantically trying to duplicate it. It would be all over the news. Celiac isn't about a lack of enzymes, its autoimmune.

Ask her for her source. Read the source. Beware her source, if she can provide one. It will not be a reliable & well recognized Medical Center. It will be someone trying to sell us "a cure".

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Thanx u I knew she seemed very whacky I trust this board with everything :) you made my weekend by confirming my thoughts xoxo

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I have heard this from a woman on another board? And wonder how valid this statement was? Thank you!

I remember reading a recent article about celiacs eating wheat having a cancer risk. Celiacs on the gluten-free diet were fine.

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Hello, almost every medical site you read frpm the Chicago Med Center who are top of field in Specialized Celiac Dr.`s to Columbia University, all state why it is important if diagnosed to follow life-time strict gluten free diet.

Left untreated or by ignoring confirmed celiac disease could be life threatening for you. We celiacs are prone to be afflicted with dibilitating or life threatening problems: malabsorption, osteoporosis, tooth enamel wearing, your central and peripheral nervous system can be effected, pancreatic disease, internal hemorrhaging, organ disorders (gall bladder, liver, and spleen), and gynecological disorders. Untreated celiac disease has also been linked an increased risk of certain types of cancer, especially intestinal lymphoma. Terri

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Terri I'm aware of all of this....I was wondering if this ? However was true.

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There are some people who are either not sticking to the diet, or have not recovered physically yet and are prone to saying crazy things. And then there are people who are just trolling trying to provoke anxiety or attention. Sounds like you found one of them.

Trying to figure this out, it just sounds like confusion. There is an enzyme involved in celiac reactions, transglutaminase 2, aka TG2.

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    • She (your PCP)  can order a celiac blood panel.  It might not be a complete panel, but it's a start.  Any medical doctor can order one.  A GI is needed for the endoscopy (ulcers, Celiac disease, h.pylori, etc.), HIDA scan (gallbladder)  or colonoscopy (IBS).   Since you just saw her, email/call/write a letter and ask her to order (lab) the celiac panel.  You could go to the lab before or after work.  Pretty easy!  
    • I just now saw the second reply and I see what you mean. Again, the issue is that I may have to go with the gluten until close to the end of the year.

      However, an idea did just come to mind, and that is, can my primary care doctor do such a test? I had normal blood work done, but they didn't really say anything about testing for celiacs. I can get an appointment with my primary care doctor much sooner than a GI.

      When I was talking to my PCP last, I asked her what I should expect as far as testing goes or what she may have been concerned about. Her reply was about a HIDA scan for the gallbladder but also any test needed in case of IBS or Celiacs. Just the way she threw that in there like an after thought and left me hanging kinda had me worried.
    • I am not a doctor that's for sure.  So, I can't even answer your questions.  If you know you have pre-diabetes, you probably are working with a doctor.  Can you email them and ask for a celiac blood panel?   You can work on the weight loss and diabetes -- that you can handle yourself now and take action.  I have diabetes and my glucose readings are fairly normal now without medication and I'm thin.  Being overweight does not cause diabetes.  It's either autoimmune (type 1) or you become insulin resistant (type 2).  You can cut out all sugar and  processed stuff ASAP to help take action and start walking 10,000 steps (helps with the insulin resistance).    But the prediabetes is not going to kill you in the next year.  Whatever's in your gut is more likely going to get you much sooner.  But heck, I'm not a doctor and I don't even know you!    
    • Hi Steph, Yes, celiac disease can cause a myriad of symptoms and damage to the body,  Have you completed all celiac disease testing?  Usually they do the blood antibodies test first and then do an endoscopy.   You shouldn't go gluten-free until all testing is completed. Gluten is in many processed foods.  But if you stick with whole foods it is not hard to avoid gluten.  Getting used to eating gluten-free may take some time, as we need to adjust our preferences in diet.  But there are many foods that are naturally gluten-free.  Gluten is the protein found in wheat, rye and barley.  Some celiac disease organizations recommend avoiding oats also for the first 18 months of the gluten-free diet. Celiac disease impairs the ability of the body to absorb nutrients (including vitamins).  That can make it hard for the body to maintain itself and heal/repair damage.  So celiac can easily impact any part of the body. Sardines, tuna, mackeral and salmon have good amounts of vitamin D in them.  There are supplements available also, but not all are good.  You can check them at the labdoor website.  Nature Made is a good one and not expensive.  Internal damage from celiac can cause liver issues.  Those will probably clear up after being on the gluten-free diet a while. Recovery from celiac can take  months, and can be a rocky road.  The more you stick with whole foods and avoid cross-contamination issues the sooner you will heal IMHO. You may find that dairy causes problems for your digestion at first.  But it make stop being a problem after you have healed up some. welcome to the forum!
    • Will this be dangerous considering how long I have to wait for any testing? I may not even get a blood test in November but here is hoping. I just worry having to wait so long will cause serious issues, not to mention delay of weight loss which I need for the pre-diabetes. Do ulcers have a chance to cause yellow stools though? I suppose a stool test will be needed for that for any signs of blood in stools but visually it does not seem so. The biggest issue is not knowing what else could be causing the yellow stools as this would not be a diabetic or ulcer thing. And without negative signs on the gallbladder or liver, it is narrowing down the list.

      At the very least this is making me assume I can wait on a final scan of gallbladder and attempt blood tests and endoscopy if they recommend it.
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