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First Time On Plane Celiac


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28 replies to this topic

#16 love2travel

 
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Posted 15 September 2011 - 06:09 PM

Never heard of the Kind bars, will definitely check them out :) I like Banana, it just tastes great

If you like lots of whole nuts barely held together with sticky goodness you will like Kind bars. Completely different texture than Lara Bars. Crunchiness with chewiness! :P
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<p>Confirmed celiac disease February 2011 from biopsies. Strictly gluten free March 18 2011.Diagnosed with fibromyalgia April 13 2011.3 herniated discs, myofascial pain syndrome, IT band syndrome, 2 rotator cuff injuries - from an accident Dec. 07 - resulting in chronic pain ever since. Degenerative disc disease.Osteoarthritis in back and hips.Chronic insomnia mostly due to chronic pain.Aspartame free May 2011.

When our lives are squeezed by pressure and pain, what comes out is what is inside.

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#17 Kim69

 
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Posted 16 September 2011 - 01:17 PM

I wish we could get Lara bars in Australia! You guys in USA are always raving about them! I am quite jealous.
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May 2010 Diagnosed coeliac via biopsy - on gluten-free diet, now not anaemic
March 2010 Still Anaemic and very fatigued, abdominal pain still (Drs had thought it was related to abdom operation)
May 2009 Anaemic - had abdominal surgery; hysterectomy to remove large fibroid
March 2009 Vestibular neuritus (not sure if related but who knows!)
November 2008 Depression (still on meds - working well)

#18 love2travel

 
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Posted 16 September 2011 - 01:26 PM

I wish we could get Lara bars in Australia! You guys in USA are always raving about them! I am quite jealous.

You are truly not missing much in my opinion. There are lots better out there! But I, too, often get jealous of all the products available (i.e. King Arthur flour) and gluten-free bakeries and restaurants in the US. We seem sooooooooo behind here in Canada. :( Hopefully that will change soon!
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<p>Confirmed celiac disease February 2011 from biopsies. Strictly gluten free March 18 2011.Diagnosed with fibromyalgia April 13 2011.3 herniated discs, myofascial pain syndrome, IT band syndrome, 2 rotator cuff injuries - from an accident Dec. 07 - resulting in chronic pain ever since. Degenerative disc disease.Osteoarthritis in back and hips.Chronic insomnia mostly due to chronic pain.Aspartame free May 2011.

When our lives are squeezed by pressure and pain, what comes out is what is inside.

#19 annegirl

 
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Posted 26 September 2011 - 07:36 PM

You all should give Trio bars a try. I love them, and they're much yummier than Lara Bars. They have three seeds, nuts and fruits in them.

As far as airplane food, I just flew and packed a baggie of sliced peaches and a baggie of chicken to eat with gluten free crackers. I also have salad dressing in little carry on size toiletry containers, fruit strips, nuts, chips, apples, salt and pepper (dextrose in table salt), CHOCOLATE!! They've never blinked. :) The little tuna packets are great too. I get the ones packed in olive oil to avoid the soy broth (this is saving me from 4 days of starvation right now!). You can also get little packets of peanut butter and almond butter to put on apples or gluten free crackers etc. I try to make sure I have a good combination of protein and carb options so I don't get too hungry. Oh! Hormel has a gluten free pepperoni stick that is nice too. I got a big bag at Costco.
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#20 Mack the Knife

 
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Posted 26 September 2011 - 08:31 PM

I wish we could get Lara bars in Australia! You guys in USA are always raving about them! I am quite jealous.


There used to be a few health food shops in Melbourne that carried a very limited range of Lara Bars. But they all seem to have stopped selling them recently.

I wasn't a fan to be honest. They were very dense and sticky. I always need to drink a litre of water after eating one to wash it down.

I eat Carman's Fruit Deluxe muesli bars which you can get at most supermarkets in the regular muesli bar aisle. They're labelled gluten free and are the same price as regular muesli bars. Plus they are delicious.

I'm not a fan of Trio bars either. I tried one and it tasted like bubble gum which just seemed wrong.
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#21 anabananakins

 
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Posted 26 September 2011 - 08:48 PM

I wish we could get Lara bars in Australia! You guys in USA are always raving about them! I am quite jealous.



We can - I've seen them at Thomas Dux and other health food shops (though I haven't checked recently) I was really jealous of them too, but I actually don't like them much. They are very sweet. I bought heaps of them on a trip to LA and ended up giving them to my friend.
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#22 jumpingjuniper

 
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Posted 06 December 2011 - 10:15 AM

I would recommend staying away from the Schar bread, though, unless your husband likes cruel and unusual punishment.


Do you mean the Schar bread gave him problems, or that it just doesn't taste good?

I live in Europe and eat a fair bit of Schar products, I'd certainly be curious to know if it caused problems for him.

Thanks!
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#23 love2travel

 
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Posted 06 December 2011 - 12:00 PM

Do you mean the Schar bread gave him problems, or that it just doesn't taste good?

I live in Europe and eat a fair bit of Schar products, I'd certainly be curious to know if it caused problems for him.

Thanks!

On my first trip gluten free to Europe I tried Schar products and gagged on the so-called bread. It was so horrible! No problems - the flavour and texture were unforgettably bad but now I am rather spoiled by Glutino's Genius bread (or my homemade bread). However, I do rather like their hard crunchy bread sticks. Are there other Schar products you can recommend? We own a house in Europe and travel there regularly. Are the ciabatta rolls ok? As a baker I love to bake my own things but that is not always feasible when traveling long distances.
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<p>Confirmed celiac disease February 2011 from biopsies. Strictly gluten free March 18 2011.Diagnosed with fibromyalgia April 13 2011.3 herniated discs, myofascial pain syndrome, IT band syndrome, 2 rotator cuff injuries - from an accident Dec. 07 - resulting in chronic pain ever since. Degenerative disc disease.Osteoarthritis in back and hips.Chronic insomnia mostly due to chronic pain.Aspartame free May 2011.

When our lives are squeezed by pressure and pain, what comes out is what is inside.

#24 jumpingjuniper

 
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Posted 06 December 2011 - 01:43 PM

Hi,

Thanks for your reply!

The Schar Fette Croccanti crackers are amazing. My non-gluten-free husband loves them too. They're just a snack, but they're great. Their little cracker snack packs are good too.

The croissants au chocolat are okay but not awesome, but it's nice if you're missing that kind of thing. You've got to warm them up.

The mini baguettes are good toasted (they crumble completely untoasted) and I've found them fantastic for travel. When we have guests and are touring around with them, I make myself a sandwich in a baguette in the morning and it's always quite tasty at lunch and saves me the worry of finding somewhere to eat.

They have another product, I can't remember the name, that is a sweet breakfast bread. Petit Pain, maybe? Or Pain Matin? Anyway, it's delicious and you don't even need to toast it. Quite sweet, but very good. Definitely a treat.

Their penne and fusili are good.

Where I live we also have a DS-Schar brand that makes a few frozen things - I did not like the lasagne, I do like the tortellini, ravioli, and pizza. They are definitely frozen-food calibre, but within that category I think they're quite good. They also carry a millefoglie pastry crust which would probably be really useful for baking, though I've never tried it.

Bon Appetit!
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#25 Mango04

 
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Posted 06 December 2011 - 02:41 PM

I am curious to know for how long you were in Europe and what you did about food while you were there. My husband has multiple food allergies in addition to being a celiac. He is very sensitive to even the smallest amount of contamination, so when we travel, I will reserve a hotel or condo with a full kitchen and we typically bring all of our food with us (except for fresh meats, fruits and vegetables). We tack an extra day onto our trips so that we can spend a day cooking, providing meals for the duration of the trip. I have an insulated picnic pack and we carry food with us for the day. We really don't trust restaurants after several bad experiences. So far, all of our travel has been in the U.S., but we have been discussing a trip to Europe. I figure we will need an apartment while we are there, to have access to a kitchen, but am not sure about how we can bring food from U.S. into another country. I am thinking we may need to ship it to our first destination ahead of time. We would like to see France, Germany and Italy. If it would not be too personal to share some of your experience, I would appreciate it.


Europe is actually quite easy and much more celiac-aware than the US. I find traveling around Europe easier than traveling around the US ('m sensitive with multiple allergies as well). I've done it without a kitchen - with a kitchen it would definitely be doable.
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"Let food be thy medicine, and let thy medicine be food." - Hippocrates

#26 love2travel

 
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Posted 06 December 2011 - 06:28 PM

Europe is actually quite easy and much more celiac-aware than the US. I find traveling around Europe easier than traveling around the US ('m sensitive with multiple allergies as well). I've done it without a kitchen - with a kitchen it would definitely be doable.

I so agree. FAR easier than on the prairies in Canada!
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<p>Confirmed celiac disease February 2011 from biopsies. Strictly gluten free March 18 2011.Diagnosed with fibromyalgia April 13 2011.3 herniated discs, myofascial pain syndrome, IT band syndrome, 2 rotator cuff injuries - from an accident Dec. 07 - resulting in chronic pain ever since. Degenerative disc disease.Osteoarthritis in back and hips.Chronic insomnia mostly due to chronic pain.Aspartame free May 2011.

When our lives are squeezed by pressure and pain, what comes out is what is inside.

#27 love2travel

 
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Posted 06 December 2011 - 06:30 PM

Hi,

Thanks for your reply!

The Schar Fette Croccanti crackers are amazing. My non-gluten-free husband loves them too. They're just a snack, but they're great. Their little cracker snack packs are good too.

The croissants au chocolat are okay but not awesome, but it's nice if you're missing that kind of thing. You've got to warm them up.

The mini baguettes are good toasted (they crumble completely untoasted) and I've found them fantastic for travel. When we have guests and are touring around with them, I make myself a sandwich in a baguette in the morning and it's always quite tasty at lunch and saves me the worry of finding somewhere to eat.

They have another product, I can't remember the name, that is a sweet breakfast bread. Petit Pain, maybe? Or Pain Matin? Anyway, it's delicious and you don't even need to toast it. Quite sweet, but very good. Definitely a treat.

Their penne and fusili are good.

Where I live we also have a DS-Schar brand that makes a few frozen things - I did not like the lasagne, I do like the tortellini, ravioli, and pizza. They are definitely frozen-food calibre, but within that category I think they're quite good. They also carry a millefoglie pastry crust which would probably be really useful for baking, though I've never tried it.

Bon Appetit!

Thank you for the awesome information! I am saving this for our next trip which we have booked for May. There is a great store with lots of Schar stuff on our way to Croatia in Slovenia.
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<p>Confirmed celiac disease February 2011 from biopsies. Strictly gluten free March 18 2011.Diagnosed with fibromyalgia April 13 2011.3 herniated discs, myofascial pain syndrome, IT band syndrome, 2 rotator cuff injuries - from an accident Dec. 07 - resulting in chronic pain ever since. Degenerative disc disease.Osteoarthritis in back and hips.Chronic insomnia mostly due to chronic pain.Aspartame free May 2011.

When our lives are squeezed by pressure and pain, what comes out is what is inside.

#28 dandt

 
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Posted 07 December 2011 - 06:55 PM

I'm also gluten and dairy free and the flight I usually take mainly only serves a refreshment so I can't have a gluten-free meal. I usually just accept it and have a look at what is inside. Ingredients are usually on all the little packets so I just work out what I can have and take the rest with me to give to someone at the other end.

All these other tips are especially useful for me though as I will be flying brisbane-Los angeles in a month or so and not only is it my longest ever flight but the first where I'll be gluten-free/df and actualyl need to eat at some point. Ahh how I wish I could have a stopover.
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#29 aeraen

 
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Posted 16 December 2011 - 04:07 PM

I always bring my own snacks/meals on flights and have never had an issue. Sliced apples (or carrots) are delicious dipped in peanut butter, and it gives you that extra protein to keep you satisfied. I bring rice crackers (the Fung Sui brand at my local supermarket, Asian aisle) and whatever I want to put on them. Egg salad, chcken salad, hummus. Sliced cheese works nicely, too.

If you tell the TSA that it is part of a special diet, they will wave your food right through. If you don't want to deal with explaining, however, you can break your objectionable food (peanut butter, hummus, whatever) into small (3 oz) plastic containers. I once brough 4 small containers of peanut butter through. As long as it all fits in a quart sized zipper bag, they won't argue at all.
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