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Ideas For Snacks On The Go - When Having Alot Of Intolerances And Super Sensitive?!
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Ok,

So I'm on the go - alot. I'll list the foods I can eat at the moment. Let me know if you have ideas of something I should eliminate or add - I'm still learning - cuz I'm still SICK! Anyways, I need to make some kind of on the go snacks, and treats for when Im out and about. Let me know of any ideas at all!!

(all fruit and veggies are organic and most peeled)

Apples

Cucumber

Eggplant

Melons

Passionfruit

Pineapple

Sweet Potatoes

Herbs grown in garden (rosemary, thyme, parsley, basil)

Potatoe

Spinach

Peach

Mango

Celery

Bell Peppers

Green Onion

Banana

Berries (NOT strawberries)

Squash

Cabbage

Apricots

Greens

Carrots

Chamomile, Lavender and Peppermint Tea (organic)

Wild Salmon (Crown Prince)

Sorghum by Twin Valley mills

Teff from Teff Company

Buckwheat from Raw from the Farm

Coconut Water - fresh from coconut

Chickpeas

Garbonzo Beans

Amaranth

Quinoa Brand Pasta

Olive Oil

Organic Local Honey

Since I don't buy flours to cook with, do any of you have "safe flours" or a way to make flour?

I just want to have snacks again that isn't carrot sticks or a fruit, ya know?

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Can you have dairy and eggs?

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Can you add nuts? nutsonline.com is great, and they have some gluten-free flours that you might not be able to purchase locally. Yesterday I started a new post on a different thread about how happy I am with Almond flour and really wish I had found it earlier. It's great (and more forgiving) then wheat flour for making gravies. Skylark uses arrowroot for gravies.

Another snack item is seeds, like pumpkin, squash, sunflower. You can dry roast your own or purchase them.

If you can do nuts and seeds and dried fruits, you can make a bunch of high energy, healthy snacks for when you are on the go.

If you're allergic to tree nuts, I'd still try macadamias and cashews because they're from a different food family.

Good snacking, hope this helps.

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Can you have dairy and eggs?

Nope, no dairy, and no eggs. Learned that the hard way!!

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Nope, no dairy, and no eggs. Learned that the hard way!!

I had that feeling you might have those restrictions. Are you looking for something sweet? I was originally going to suggest Pamela's Baking & Pancake Mix for banana bread but it has dairy (also almond meal). And it pretty well leaves out mixes like Betty Crocker.

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Maybe we can help better if you tell us what you can't eat.

And do you have a blender or food processor?

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Maybe we can help better if you tell us what you can't eat.

And do you have a blender or food processor?

I have a blender and a food processor.

What is listed is all I can eat, for sure. Nuts, are questionable. I will begin my "nut testing" as soon as I get my insides calm from this last upset. I follow no soy, no dairy, no gluten (obviously LOL), no corn, no processed (with very very very few exceptions), no beans (except for garbonzo), and generally no nuts, but will be trying those soon.

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My brother, whose in college, is allergic to seven of the eight allergen and is always on the search for snacks that he can take with him on the go. He has celiacs of course, and is very sensitive to many store-bought products. He absolutely loves the

Enjoy Life Products- He swears by them. They are a free of the eight most common allergens. He buys the semi-sweet chocolate mini chips and cinnamon crunch granola and mixes them to make a cinnamon chocolate granola. He keeps them in his car so that he can grab a few handfuls on the way to class etc. He also loves the chocolate bars. While they are high in fat, they are extremely delicious. In fact, he often catches me eating them in place of allergen-loaded chocolate bars!

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Do you eat any other meats? My partner made us beef jerky in the food dehydrator and it was great! You can make salmon jerky. Recently we found wild caught salmon in on the go aseptic packs at the REI with no added ingredients, so you might have luck with that.

We don't do any grains, but when we did I liked how buckwheat did in biscuits and crusts. Maybe you could make things like that to bring? Chopped veggies are a staple for us.

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My daughter frequently has hummus as a snack with apple slices or baby carrots to dip it in. If you can't eat the pre-made hummus you can make your own version by simply whipping some cooked chick peas in the blender. You might want to add a few drops of oil or even the cooking liquid to thin it. Add garlic or some herbs to flavor.

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Let me preface this comment by saying that I am really crazy sensitive. You probably don't need to be as extreme as I am.

Twin Valley Mills is a wonderful company. I read that they spend two days cleaning out their shared harvesting equipment before harvesting their sorghum. I have sorted, washed and eaten about 60 pounds of their whole grain sorghum. I have found both corn and gluten containing (which looked like wheat) grains in their sorghum bucket.

I suggest that you sort and wash before eating it. Not very many, maybe at a rate of one grain per bucket (30 lbs). Even without being all that sensitive, if you happen to get a serving with a wheat grain in it, watch out.

I have a grain mill for making flour. Initially I got a cheap (about $30) coffee grinder and used that. You could try it.

I can't eat most of the produce that is sold in stores without feeling symptoms. I do better at farmer's markets, and best with my home garden. My back yard is slowly being transformed into a "working farm." I have had particular trouble with citrus, tomatoes, peppers, and apples. I found a nothing on them but bugs and dirt source for citrus and don't react to those at all. I believe that it is due to the edible coating that they use to increase shelf life. Things that can be carefully peeled seem to work best.

Store bought spices were a problem with me. I did better when I started buying them fresh. Now I grow my own.

Sometimes it just takes awhile to heal. You also need to watch for environmental gluten (walking past the bakery section in the store) and gluten on the people around you. (Kissing someone who just had a beer). Plus toiletries.

I hope you stop feeling sick soon.

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Ok,

So I'm on the go - alot. I'll list the foods I can eat at the moment. Let me know if you have ideas of something I should eliminate or add - I'm still learning - cuz I'm still SICK! Anyways, I need to make some kind of on the go snacks, and treats for when Im out and about. Let me know of any ideas at all!!

(all fruit and veggies are organic and most peeled)

Apples

Cucumber

Eggplant

Melons

Passionfruit

Pineapple

Sweet Potatoes

Herbs grown in garden (rosemary, thyme, parsley, basil)

Potatoe

Spinach

Peach

Mango

Celery

Bell Peppers

Green Onion

Banana

Berries (NOT strawberries)

Squash

Cabbage

Apricots

Greens

Carrots

Chamomile, Lavender and Peppermint Tea (organic)

Wild Salmon (Crown Prince)

Sorghum by Twin Valley mills

Teff from Teff Company

Buckwheat from Raw from the Farm

Coconut Water - fresh from coconut

Chickpeas

Garbonzo Beans

Amaranth

Quinoa Brand Pasta

Olive Oil

Organic Local Honey

Since I don't buy flours to cook with, do any of you have "safe flours" or a way to make flour?

I just want to have snacks again that isn't carrot sticks or a fruit, ya know?

First, if you don't already have one get a small insulated lunch bag that you can stick an ice pack in to take with you.

Next, get a bunch of little containers to keep your food fresh.

Third, prep all your fruit and veggies at once (for 4-5 days worth if you are eating them every day)

Okay, ideas of snacks/portable food based on your list here:

Apple slices and honey to dip them in--put lemon juice on them to keep them from browning.

Cucumbers, bell peppers, carrots, and celery are all good dipped in hummus (very easy to make at home).

Make yourself a bunch of little fruit cups with the fruits you can have. Add honey to the berrie sif they are too tart and lemon or lime juice to anythign that might get brown.

chickpeas can be roasted in the oven (seasoned with whatever spices you can have) to get a good protein snack that is portable.

If you really have patience you can try making you own chips from sweet potatoes and potatoes and dehydrating (with a food dehydrator) some of the fruits you can have like apples, bananas and pineapples.

Are you vegetarian? Because based on this list you are not getting much protein. If you're doing an elimnation diet and adding things back in one at a time you really should try nuts or beans next to up you protein.

ETA: okay just noticed you have Salmon on your list so you are probably not vegetarian. I would try adding a meat next like chicken or turkey. For meals on the go, you can easily cook a bunch of chicken breasts, slice them up and then take in your cold bag to put on top of salad or eat in a lettuce wrap. If you're a pescatarin, try tuna next since it's an easy portable snack and goes well on salad also. You may be able to get smoked salmon that you can take with you too.

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Okay *cracks knuckles* let's see what pops here. ;)

I'm in the same super-duper sensitive boat with Steph, so some (possibly most) of what I have to say may not apply. I'll pass it along, just in case!

Foods with wax coatings have ended up being a problem for me. It feels like a gluten reaction, but a very mild one. I thought at first that buying organic would take care of that, but a number of wax coatings are approved for use with organic produce, so that didn't turn out so well (Organic-approved Food-Grade vegetable, beeswax, or carnuba-based waxes are a few I know about. I believe Shellac wax can be used on organic, too - it's insect based.).

Of the fruits and veggies you mentioned, I know that the following can have wax coatings apples, cucumbers, sweet potatoes, potatoes, eggplant, peaches, passion fruit, mangos, melons, pineapple, squash and bell peppers. Of course, just because these all can have wax coatings, they don't necessarily do have them. A store is supposed to have a sign somewhere near the produce saying if wax is used with their produce, but not all of them adhere to the law like they should.

( http://www.newsnet5.com/dpp/money/consumer/consumer_specialist/hidden-camera-investigation-reveals-local-grocery-stores-breaking-federal-law ) (this article also has the list from one store listing all their waxed produce)

I have managed to find some of the above produce wax-free, and it does much better, except for most of the 'exotic' fruits. There are almost always problems with these, even for unwaxed ones like bananas. I have no idea why. I haven't found any tropical fruits that do well with me in a long, long time.

I should mention, even with peeling and washing, I couldn't tolerate the waxed fruits and veggies from the store. Maybe whatever the knife was encountering as it cut through the skin was being dragged through enough to get into the flesh (I know this is a problem for those with severe allergies). Or perhaps something has leached through thinner peels into the flesh. Not entirely certain, honestly. I just tend to note down reactions to food, try to wash them and peel them more carefully, and if I'm still stick, I try to investigate. If I'm lucky, I can find a connection that holds up under further study and experimentation. :D

Tea - do you make this yourself? If you don't, have you checked to see what else they make in their facility or on the same line? I've run into trouble with tea companies that also made tea with oatstraw, wheatgrass, and/or barley.

Crown Prince salmon - do you know what else is made on the line that processes their salmon? My son can have their products, but I get slightly ill on both their smoked kippers in water and their brisling sardines in water. I tried their canned salmon and it made me ill, too, but it was early on, before I figured out my gluten reaction vs. my allergy one. I didn't write down what the reaction was, so I don't know if it was gluten or not.

They make a number of products that have condiments and sauces added to the fish, like mustard and tomato, and they make a lot of products using soybean oil and cottonseed oil. Soybean and cottonseed can be a gluten cc hazard.

Might be worthwhile to see what else is processed on the same equipment as the salmon.

Re: this list of your foods...

Sorghum by Twin Valley mills

Teff from Teff Company

Buckwheat from Raw from the Farm

Coconut Water - fresh from coconut

Chickpeas

Garbonzo Beans

Amaranth

Quinoa Brand Pasta

Olive Oil

Organic Local Honey

I have tried some of my own local honey (that hasn't added medication for the bees due to mites. This was really hard to find), amaranth from bob's red mill and a couple other sources, chickpeas from local stores and Rancho Gordo, Ancient Harvest brand quinoa products, spectrum and bertolli and Bariani olive oil, the same brands of sorghum and teff and the coconut water.

Out of all of those, the only ones that worked for more than a week or two without reaction were the chickpeas from Rancho Gordo, the whole grain quinoa (but not the pasta), the bariani olive oil, and the Twin Valley Mills Sorghum.

I should mention, however, that we think I am also oat sensitive, so there are some products that I might be having an oat cc issue rather than a gluten cc one.

From the ones that worked:

1. the chickpeas have been hit or miss. I thought at first they made me sick, then tried them later and was fine. Then got a new batch and was sick again. The company itself gets their chickpeas from many different small farms, so the gluten cc level on an individual farm may vary. I believe that's why I am sometimes okay with it, and sometimes not.

2. The whole grain quinoa has been dropped for a while due to a suspicion of low level cc, but I haven't yet tried it again.

3. The olive oil is okay so far.

4. The sorghum seems okay if I don't eat too much of it - maybe 1/2-1/3 cup, uncooked. If I get more than that, I'm noticing that I start having a gluten reaction. So, sigh, thinking of dropping that for a bit, too, just to see if that's been an issue. :(

For the products that haven't worked, the two that seemed the best for others have been the teff company and the raw from the farm stuff.

Okay, now onto something actually positive instead of all the 'possibly a problem' issues! :-)

The quick answer for if I've got safe flours is pretty much 'no.' But I have been able to make a kind of latke with ground sorghum and cooked sweet potato that I fry in olive oil. Baked, I don't have the recipe quite right, so it doesn't work so well.

Snacks that have traveled okay:

- the roasted chickpeas previously mentioned - with just oil and salt, those are nice.

- a version of falafel. Soak chickpeas for 8 hours. Drain 'em. In a food processor, mix this with some herbs (2-3 Tb), a little salt, and a veggie that has moisture - I've tried onion with parsley as well as eggplant/ zucchini with oregano and sage and savory, and they've all worked okay. I alter the amount of beans vs. veggie until I get enough moisture to stick together, but not so much that it becomes sludge (veggie for moisture, bean for dryness). Then make little golf-ball sized dough balls, flatten slightly, and fry in 1-2 inches of oil, 1-2 minutes each side. You have to process it into small enough pieces or it won't cook right and the chickpeas will still be crunchy. This is good by itself, or with dips of pureed veggies, hummus, etc...

- homemade hummus might work for you, too. Chickpeas, salt, and olive oil, plus something sour, whirred together in a food processor, will work. I used lemon when I had some, but now I'm out. However, I'm going to try apple cider vinegar next. You can make it yourself using just apples and nothing else, if you get fall/winter apples. These have a higher sugar content than other varieties and so you don't have to add sugar or yeast to make the juice ferment properly.

- popped sorghum is easy to transport, nice with olive oil and salt. If you haven't made this yet, it's easy in the microwave. We got a microwave popper, but honestly, I think you could jury rig something with an upside down plate, a big bowl on top of that, and an upside down plate on top of that as a lid. You just pop it about 1/4-1/3 cup at a time, listen for the popping to slow down just like you do for popcorn.

- With some of your fruit, you might be able to make a sugar-free jam/jelly, if you study up on jam making. They CAN be made without added pectin or sugar, but you have to get the right combination of ripe and unripe, and the right level of sweetness in the fruit. Personally, I suck terribly at this, so I've never managed it. :P

- For the teff - have you looked at injera bread, yet? It's a fermented Ethiopian bread that is a flexible pancake type bread, tastes a little like sourdough, and would travel well. It goes with savory foods as opposed to sweet. The softness of it is truly amazing - I'm assuming the fermentation is what allows this, because it's just teff, water, salt, and a little oil, and that's it. Trying this with normal teff is crumbly and bleh, but it's completely different with the fermented batter. If you're interested, I found a great site with lots of details on how to make this, from a gal who lived in Ethiopa for a while. :-) To get this started takes a week or two, though, so you have to really plan ahead. I've had teff a few times, and only successfully tried the injera bread once, but it was AWESOME. Even if it made me a little sick. ;)

And...I'd better go. My kids are complaining that I'm on too long answering stuff on the web right now, LOL. I'll pop other stuff back up if I can think of anything off hand!

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Have you tried grilling squash yet? If you nuke a butternut squash for a minute, it's easier to peel. Then cut it up in chunks, slice some onion in you like it, and sea salt and pepper and drizzle it with grapeseed oil or olive oil and grill it until down.

I love it. There is real depth in the flavor and if you get a big squash there will be plenty of leftovers. I've pureed left overs and used as a dip. And you can roast squash seeds, here's a link...

http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/roasted-winter-squash-seeds/detail.aspx

I don't represent nutsonline in any way, shape or fashion, but they've been a good source for me. They're certified gluten-free, not made on lines that share gluten, soy, etc.

There are quite a few recipes for home made Lara bars on line. You could leave out the nuts and use seeds until you know whether or not nuts work for you. Hope this helps.

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I second the roasted chickpeas. They are awesomely delicious and pretty easy to make

-soak beans. Cook them until tender. Drain and cool under cold water. Then dry off with paper towels. Put on a roasting pan, add about 1 tablespoon of oil and throw in the oven at around 170F for 1 hour. Shake them once in a while. Then turn off the oven and leave them there to dry out overnight. The next morning put them in a bowl with some olive oil and salt and go crazy eating them.

One more chickpea flour recipe: farinata! It is like a flatbread that is made just from chickpea flour, water and olive oil. I heard about a company that makes a gluten-free mix that you just have to add water to. The company is called Lucini. And the product is called 'cinque & cinque' (that means 5 & 5 in Italian) just google Lucini Cinque and it should come up. I haven't tried this product myself, but I've heard it is good. There are lots of recipes on how to make your own farinata on the internet....maybe give it a try.

Oh, and homemade potato chips are pretty awesome too. Just peel potatoes. And use a veggie peeler to make really thin slices. Dry the slices, and pop into really hot oil, and fry for 30 seconds. Yum.

good luck!

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