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Communion


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#16 Strawberry_Jam

 
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Posted 31 October 2011 - 12:47 AM

When it comes to symbolic communions, bringing your own gluten-free bread should be fine, as long as you figure out the CC issue (e.g. you don't want it on the same tray with all the other gluteny communion bread).

When it comes to literal communions, such as that in the Orthodox and Catholic churches, it is different. We believe that the bread and wine physically become the body and blood of Christ, while still retaining the "accidents" of bread and wine (the appearance and effects, including the ability to make you drunk or, in the case of coeliac, sick). We also believe that the communion bread must be made of wheat in order to be validly consecrated. The low-gluten hosts that the Benedictine sisters made pass the bill because they are made from wheat starch. So they are still made from wheat, but just the non-gluten containing part.

however, there are some who cannot consume even those hosts. And in the Orthodox church, we don't have wafers but rather a common loaf which is placed in the chalice and given to the faithful on a spoon. So... what do you do, in that case?

Every particle, every drop of the bread and wine (post-consecration) contains the fullness of Christ's Body, Blood, Soul, and Divinity. There is no way to receive "half" of Christ. Ergo, receiving under only one species--that is, partaking of the wine only--is spiritually and symbolically the same as partaking under both. Catholic churches with coeliacs often have a separate chalice for them to avoid CC. In my home parish (Orthodox) I used to receive a single drop of wine from the chalice onto my tongue, which the priest would check for visible crumbs first. (worked fine for months. I am now too sensitive in this new parish for doing that so I will talk to my priest about having a separate chalice consecrated for me.)

Basically, if you don't want to mess with gluten-free bread, or if you cannot because your church does not accept gluten-free bread as valid, then partaking of the wine/holy blood alone is fine.

As long as your parish/congregation is not using intinction, or a common cup which everyone's glutened lips are touching (although in that case you can just go first).
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gluten-free 25 Feb 2011
soy-free 30 March 2011

dairy-free 30 August 2011 (roughly)

25 yrs old
diagnosed Celiac through biopsy and blood test (WAY positive) as of 25 Feb 2011


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#17 Celtic Queen

 
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Posted 31 October 2011 - 11:19 AM

I guess I'm lucky because there are 4 of us who are gluten intolerant in our church, so our pastor has stocked gluten-free wafers for us. We only have communion once a month, so it's not like he has to do it every week. He tries to be pretty discreet about it so others in the church won't notice that we're getting different bread. But it doesn't really matter to me if anyone else knows. I just think he doesn't want us feeling weird. It's funny because I was the last one of the 4 to go gluten free, so the last time we had communion he forgot to hand me the "special wafer," and I had to discreetly remind him. We use intinction, so I haven't had a problem with the wine/juice.

I hadn't thought about the whole issue until one of my fellow gluten intolerants at church mentioned it to me.
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Blood tested 8-11 positive, Biopsy 9-11 negative (long story, most gastro drs. are morons)

gluten-free 7-11, Dairy Free (mostly) 8-13 - Everything but butter.  Can't live life without butter....
 

DS - negative blood test, just diagnosed with ADD and other learning disorders, DNA test positive - high risk

Issues related to gluten: depression, low iron, hair loss, positive ana test for lupus, low vitamin D, headache, sinusitis, environmental allergies, brain fog, GI problems, weight gain....the list goes on....


#18 StephanieL

 
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Posted 31 October 2011 - 05:32 PM

Talk to your pastor. I am Catholic and my church offers bread and wine. I receive just the wine. My pastor offered to purchase rice wafers for me. If your intent is to receive communion - God knows that. He does not want you sick.


Do you ask them not to put the host in your wine? Cause the wine has host pieces in it from everything I have been taught (raised Catholic all my life).
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#19 Strawberry_Jam

 
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Posted 31 October 2011 - 10:20 PM

Do you ask them not to put the host in your wine? Cause the wine has host pieces in it from everything I have been taught (raised Catholic all my life).


That is only if there is one chalice. There is a part of the Mass where the priest symbolically breaks the host and drops a piece in the chalice. However, if there are a lot of parishioners and therefore more than one consecrated chalice so they may all partake under both species, the other chalices do not have this piece in them.

They may, however, become CC'd when others partaking in communion normally drink from them.
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gluten-free 25 Feb 2011
soy-free 30 March 2011

dairy-free 30 August 2011 (roughly)

25 yrs old
diagnosed Celiac through biopsy and blood test (WAY positive) as of 25 Feb 2011





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