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Can You Eat Gluten-Free Oats?


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54 replies to this topic

Poll: Can You Eat Gluten-Free Oats? (52 member(s) have cast votes)

Can you eat certified gluten-free oats?

  1. Yes (21 votes [40.38%])

    Percentage of vote: 40.38%

  2. No (15 votes [28.85%])

    Percentage of vote: 28.85%

  3. I'm not sure. I might have reacted. (6 votes [11.54%])

    Percentage of vote: 11.54%

  4. I haven't tried them. (10 votes [19.23%])

    Percentage of vote: 19.23%

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#1 Skylark

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Posted 10 August 2011 - 09:08 AM

With the 2007 FDA Gluten-free proposal open for comments, I got curious about how many of us can eat oats. This isn't a scientific survey, but I thought other people on the board might be curious as well. Please don't answer if you've only tried Quaker, McCann's or any other mass market brand because they are known to be CC with wheat. I'm curious if you can eat certified gluten-free oats like Bob's.
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#2 lynnelise

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Posted 10 August 2011 - 10:50 AM

I picked I might have reacted. I was eating Bob's for awhile and kept getting stomach aches so eliminated oats. Recently I was tempted by the Udi's granola and have been eating it for over two weeks without issue! So basically either just the Bob's didn't agree, the stomach aches were random or caused by something else (very likely), or I wasn't healed enough and still sensitive.

Funny thing is I never really liked oatmeal and lately I've been craving cinammon raisin oatmeal like crazy!!! The Quaker kind I used to get as a kid. I may breakdown and buy the Glutenfreeda flavored instant packs!
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#3 a1956chill

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Posted 10 August 2011 - 02:39 PM

I selected Might have reacted .
The last time I tried them was last fall. I had so many other issues (soy ,nightshades,eggs,gallbladder ect..)going on at that time I am just not sure.
I am considering trying them again when the weather turns colder ,,apple and cinnamon sound yummy :)
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Gluten free Oct/09
Soy free Nov/10

numerous additional intolerances,, i.e. If it tries to kill me I do not eat it .
After 40+ years of misdiagnoses I was diagnosed with:
Dermatitis Herpetiformis : Positive DH biopsy...... Celiac :based on DH biopsy and diet response.

Osteoporosis before  age 50
Hashimoto's thyroiditis disease .

Diagnosed type 2 Diabetes 

Osteoarthritis

Gilbert's Syndrome , confirmed by gene testing


#4 love2travel

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Posted 10 August 2011 - 03:03 PM

As I mentioned on another thread I was told not to have even certified gluten-free oats for two years post my celiac diagnosis (must give my gut time to heal - not a gluten issue). Still unsure of that one. Anyway, previously I had been having oats regularly without any problems whatsoever. But then I have never had any obvious reactions even from gluten so how can I even tell??!!
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<p>Confirmed celiac disease February 2011 from biopsies. Strictly gluten free March 18 2011.Diagnosed with fibromyalgia April 13 2011.3 herniated discs, myofascial pain syndrome, IT band syndrome, 2 rotator cuff injuries - from an accident Dec. 07 - resulting in chronic pain ever since. Degenerative disc disease.Osteoarthritis in back and hips.Chronic insomnia mostly due to chronic pain.Aspartame free May 2011.

When our lives are squeezed by pressure and pain, what comes out is what is inside.

#5 zus888

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Posted 10 August 2011 - 04:44 PM

I was also told to eliminate all oats, including gluten-free for six months. I haven't been on the gluten-free diet for that long yet. But I'll be free to start them just in time for apple cobbler!
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Suzanna

#6 butterfl8

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Posted 10 August 2011 - 06:09 PM

I haven't tried any yet. But I'm so sensitive that I'm very scared to try! I'm two years past diagnosis, so I'm 'technically' allowed to try, but I can't afford the reaction if I do react (in grad school, not the best time to be hit by brain fog...!).
-Daisy
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I haven't got the slightest idea how to change people, but still I keep a long list of prospective candidates just in case I should ever figure it out.
--David Sedaris

#7 come dance with me

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Posted 10 August 2011 - 06:28 PM

There are none available in Australia. Our health people are of the belief that even if America believes there are oats that are 99% gluten free it's not good enough to be available on our strict market. They may be labelled as low gluten (although we still don't have any) but not gluten free unless there's no trace of gluten at all.
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Lord please give me patience, because if you give me strength, I may just beat the living crap out of someone...

#8 Coleslawcat

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Posted 10 August 2011 - 07:05 PM

I was told to wait 6 months before trying them. By then I was pregnant and I didn't want to chance a reaction so I waied until after I had the baby. I tried them about a year after going gluten-free without any trouble. I've been enjoying them since on a regular basis. I had a biopsy done a month ago to verify my damage was healed and I had a 100% normal biopsy so I can safely say the gluten-free oats are not causing me any sort of reaction at all.
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#9 Skylark

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Posted 10 August 2011 - 08:39 PM

Thanks for all the answers. Keep 'em coming! I totally understand people's reluctance to try. It took me two years to get up the courage. :lol:
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#10 kellynolan82

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Posted 11 August 2011 - 03:50 AM

Does oat intolerance have something to do with the DQ8 Coeliac gene? According to the Coeliac Vaccine being developed for DQ2 patients, it applies to the three peptides (1 (in wheat), 2 (in rye) and 3 (in barley))... :unsure:
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#11 Takala

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Posted 11 August 2011 - 05:42 AM

I tried them accidentally in a chip that was not marked as having them, and I reacted. I was surprised. I haven't deliberately eaten them for .... I dunno, maybe 7 or 8 years ? I buy the certified gluten free ones for my husband, because he eats gluten free at home. I haven't really been that curious to re- test them on myself.

Re the proposed gluten free rule label FDA proposal-
It's like soy, or tapioca, or other common things that other people react to, when you hear about enough instances, you think, hmmm, maybe having the stuff labeled as to content is a good idea.
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#12 alex11602

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Posted 11 August 2011 - 05:52 AM

I keep saying that I am going to try them, but I'm too chicken to actually do it. Before I went gluten free I loved oatmeal though so hopefully I wouldn't react to them (fingers crossed for whenever I get up the nerve to try them).
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#13 FooGirlsMom

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Posted 11 August 2011 - 08:23 AM

At first oats bothered me, even Bob's Red Mill. About 6 months into being gluten-free, I was able to add them back on. I mostly use them to make treats (Cookies). I make the no-bake type with the peanut butter, added nuts, coconut, etc. Quite good. Kids love them and it slows the absorption of all the sugars because of the proteins & oats.
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When I saw this photo, I thought it truly represented my life prior to being gluten-free. It was like being rooted in place trying to survive a Category 5. Now that I am gluten-free, I feel like I just might make it :)

#14 love2travel

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Posted 11 August 2011 - 11:21 AM

There are none available in Australia. Our health people are of the belief that even if America believes there are oats that are 99% gluten free it's not good enough to be available on our strict market. They may be labelled as low gluten (although we still don't have any) but not gluten free unless there's no trace of gluten at all.


I find that very compelling and telling.
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<p>Confirmed celiac disease February 2011 from biopsies. Strictly gluten free March 18 2011.Diagnosed with fibromyalgia April 13 2011.3 herniated discs, myofascial pain syndrome, IT band syndrome, 2 rotator cuff injuries - from an accident Dec. 07 - resulting in chronic pain ever since. Degenerative disc disease.Osteoarthritis in back and hips.Chronic insomnia mostly due to chronic pain.Aspartame free May 2011.

When our lives are squeezed by pressure and pain, what comes out is what is inside.

#15 Skylark

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Posted 11 August 2011 - 11:29 AM

When I wrote Bob's about their oats, here is what they sent.

"Thank you for your inquiry. Our R5 ELISA Test allows for up to 20 parts per million, however, the majority of our products, including our oats, test below 5. Because the marker below five doesn’t specify where exactly any given batch falls, we simply consider it a trace amount (which is basically what 20 parts per million is, anyway). I must say, however, that even though our products generally test below 5, there is always a chance that they will test higher in different batches and we only guarantee that our Gluten Free Products test below 20 ppm."

They say below 5 doesn't specify how much gluten becasue 5 ppm is below the sensitivity of the R5 ELISA. In other words, most of their oats would be legal even under Australian standards.
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