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Negative Celiac Panel, But Positive From Enterolab?


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#1 AllergicToEverything

 
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Posted 10 August 2011 - 11:08 AM

I just want to confirm that this makes sense. I had a Celiac Panel done with the following results:

Tissue Transglutaminase Antibody, IGA TTG AntiBody IGA <3
Immunogobulin A 296

The conclusion of these results were that I don't have celiac or gluten intolerance.

Also using blood tests, my GP said I was tested for several food allergies. All came back negative, except he said that I had a mild allergy to shrimp.

However, my enterolab results (stool test) seems to contradict the blood tests:

Gluten/Antigenic Food Sensitivity Stool/Gene Panel
Fecal Anti-gliadin IgA 148 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)
Fecal Anti-casein (cow’s milk) IgA 25 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)
Fecal Anti-ovalbumin (chicken egg) IgA 16 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)
Fecal Anti-soy IgA 15 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0602
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0604
Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 1,1 (Subtype 6,6)

I'm assuming the blood tests are giving me false negatives and although I'm not a celiac, I am gluten intolerant and need to follow a strict gluten free diet. I'm hoping over time that my other food allergies will subside, but I am trying to generally avoid these as well. Does this sound right? Why the contradiction?

Thanks,

Bruce
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#2 daniknik

 
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Posted 14 August 2011 - 08:20 PM

I just want to confirm that this makes sense. I had a Celiac Panel done with the following results:

Tissue Transglutaminase Antibody, IGA TTG AntiBody IGA <3
Immunogobulin A 296

The conclusion of these results were that I don't have celiac or gluten intolerance.

Also using blood tests, my GP said I was tested for several food allergies. All came back negative, except he said that I had a mild allergy to shrimp.

However, my enterolab results (stool test) seems to contradict the blood tests:

Gluten/Antigenic Food Sensitivity Stool/Gene Panel
Fecal Anti-gliadin IgA 148 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)
Fecal Anti-casein (cow’s milk) IgA 25 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)
Fecal Anti-ovalbumin (chicken egg) IgA 16 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)
Fecal Anti-soy IgA 15 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0602
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0604
Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 1,1 (Subtype 6,6)

I'm assuming the blood tests are giving me false negatives and although I'm not a celiac, I am gluten intolerant and need to follow a strict gluten free diet. I'm hoping over time that my other food allergies will subside, but I am trying to generally avoid these as well. Does this sound right? Why the contradiction?

Thanks,
Bruce


Hi Bruce,

I wanted to reply to your email because I had a similar experience. I had negative blood tests for gluten with positive IgG blood tests for Dairy, Eggs, and Soy. When I did the Entero-lab testing, I came back positive for Anti-Gliadin and Anti-Casein as well as Tissue Transglutaminase. (I didnt' re-test the others since I tested positive to them in the blood tests and I had been previously diagnosed with them previously as a child and thought that I'd "grown out of those allergies"). My HLA-DQ subtype was HLA-DQ 3,1 (Subtype 8,6) which shows that I carry a Celiac gene and a gluten-sensitivity gene.

All I can say about the contradiction is that I'd already started a strict elimination diet when I did the blood tests which I believe led to the negative tests. The tests can only rule-in Celica/gluten-sensitivity, they can't rule it out completely. Since you are gluten-sensitive I'd stick to the diet. Some people say that they can heal the auto-immune responses to the other foods, I haven't been very successful in that area and I've been eating a diet free of them for nearly two years now. The one thing that I've been able to reintroduce in moderation has been eggs cooked in things (but nothing where it's quickly cooked). My allergist mentioned that baking eggs in a cake or other such item at a temperature over 350 degrees for more than 20 minutes should break down the protein enough so that your body doesn't react with it. You may be successful with eggs in this form in the future. If you're new to the diet though, I'd wait a while (as in at least 6 months) before reintroducing anything. Give your body time to heal... you will be amazed at the results.

My gut instinct tells me that the contradictory results are a result of the blood-testing methodology being inaccurate. My belief is that unless you have serious intestinal damage (i.e. active Celiac) you won't get a positive blood test/or abnormal fecal fat score. I also believe that you can be a latent Celiac/gluten sensitive person who is definitely having an auto-immune reaction to gluten and other food proteins. You know your body. You wouldn't have continued to do additional testing unless you felt something was wrong. The beauty and pain of food intolerances is that you can heal yourself through your diet. Your Dr. can tell you that you don't have Celiac disease and they can pat themselves on the back for diagnosing you with IBS (as they did in my case) but when you change your diet you should see your physical symptoms improve. In this situation go with what you feel is right. Try the diet. If you feel better, then that's your "real answer" right there. You don't need to have Celiac diagnosis to be reacting to gluten. You also don't need to stick your neck in the sand and pretend that being Celiac-free means everything is fine. Trust yourself. Eat what works for you. You will regain your health by doing so! You can do it!!!
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Pre-Diagnosis: GERD, IBS, irregular menstruation, vitiligo, migraine, body pain, tingling in fingers, rhinitis, depression, night sweats, leg cramps, bruising, anemia, fatigue, mouth sores, hypoglycemia.
Positive IgG blood results for: Egg, Casein, Soy.
Positive EnteroLab IgA fecal results: anti-gliadin, anti-tissue Transglutaminase, anti-casein
Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,1 (Subtype 8,6)
Post-Testing: Free of gluten, dairy, soy, eggs, legumes and nightshade veggies. May 2012 Dx Premature Ovarian Failure.

#3 AllergicToEverything

 
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Posted 15 August 2011 - 04:13 PM

Thanks so much for your thoughtful response. I must confess that deep down, I knew the answer to my question before I even asked it. I've just gotten a little frustrated. After 3 weeks of being on a gluten free diet, I haven't had any noticeable improvement in my major symptoms (insomnia, moodiness, acid reflux, depression). I guess that I don't really have a choice but to hang in there.

I was really hoping that I could overcome the other allergies. Based on your experience, it doesn't sound particularily promising. One thing that I'm not clear on is what are the consequences of continuing to eat eggs, etc. With gluten, I understand some of the complications. With the others, I don't. Are the consequences as dire?

Thanks!

Bruce
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#4 Skylark

 
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Posted 15 August 2011 - 11:04 PM

The Enterolab results may not mean anything. Here is my take on Enterolab that I wrote for someone else and cut/pasted to this onsite blog so I could find it again for other people.
http://www.celiac.co...ists-viewpoint/

If I were you, I'd stick to the gluten-free diet for a total of 3-4 months. If you still don't feel any different, you're probably barking up the wrong tree. Try reintroducing gluten and see if anything changes. Without any TTG results, there is not much evidence that you're celiac and it's unlikely with DQ6. As I mention in that article, Fine notes in his lectures that 30% of healthy people have anti-gliadin antibodies in their stool.

I wouldn't even consider any of the other results interesting if I got that panel back. They're 10x below your gluten reaction and hardly over the super-low cutoff. You could try elimination and challenge to be sure. There will be no long-term consequences if you eat soy, milk, or egg and don't seem to react to them.

You might want to look up some of the interesting new studies on intestinal bacteria and depression. You might get some benefit from probiotics like Yakult or DanActive (which BTW is not guaranteed to be gluten-free). Also, take fish oil, sprinkle lecithin on your food, and take a GOOD multivitamin with plenty of B-complex. You'd be amazed what nutrition can do for the mind.
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#5 timothymichael

 
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Posted 16 August 2011 - 05:44 AM

Hey Bruce:

One tip that works for me (most things dont, I have the most sensitive stomach in the world I think) is to fast.

One thing that I did a lot was try and eat certain foods to feel if it would affect my body, when in fact my body didn't need any more food in it. If I am feeling poor and unbalanced, the best thing I can do for my body is to eat really lightly... and when I would normally eat dinner, maybe just not eat anything at all... much on a clove of garlic, go jogging, go to bed.

When I wake up from a fasting day, I feel LIGHT and my stomach feels empty. When my stomach feels light and empty, so does my body.

Try fasting for a day, just maybe eat some steamed veggies and shrimp / fish in a small proportion and see what you feel like the next day.
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#6 nora_n

 
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Posted 16 August 2011 - 10:44 AM

You are DQ1 (DQ6 and DQ5 are subtypes of DQ1)
and some DQ1 can be very sensitive to gluten.

Usually they test negative for celiac.

I can only remember one person here being DQ6 and officially celiac (several others were obviously symptomatic, and got better off gluten, but had negative tests, and there are two or more forums out there about gluten sensitivity and there are lots of DQ1 there)

You only had the ttg-test, which is desigend to be high when there is much damage to the intestines.

There are more tests, like the antigliadin test, and the deaminated gliadin test. Maybe you would be positive on the antigliadin test?

But DQ1 are sensitive to gluten many other places than just the villi, and rarely test positive re. villi damage.

gluten sensitivity is much much more than just villi damage and DQ2/8.

If you google hadjivassiliou, he says that about 20% of his gluten ataxia patients are DQ1.
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gluten-free since may 06 after neg. biopsy symptoms went away and DH symptoms which I had since 03 got gradually better.
daughter officially diagnosed celiac and casein intolerant.
non-DQ2 or DQ8. Maybe DQ1? Updated: Yes, double DQ5
Hypothyroid since 2000, thyroxine first started to work well 06 on a low-carb and gluten-free diet
Lost 20 kg after going gluten-free and weighing 53 kg now. neg. biopsy for DH. Found out afterwards from this forum that it should have been taken during an outbreak but it was taken two weeks after. vitaminD was 57 nmol/l in may08)




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