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Descriptions of DH "Types"
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Have any of you seen the descriptions in this book: Essentials of diseases of the skin By Henry Weightman Stelwagon?

Its the ONLY description like this on the appearance of DH I've ever read.

http://books.google.com/books?id=u8D9zlQ6kqgC&lpg=PA81&ots=aXWadwS06f&dq=salicylate%2Bdermatitis%20herpetiformis&pg=PA82#v=onepage&q=salicylate+dermatitis%20herpetiformis&f=false

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Have any of you seen the descriptions in this book: Essentials of diseases of the skin By Henry Weightman Stelwagon?

Its the ONLY description like this on the appearance of DH I've ever read.

http://books.google.com/books?id=u8D9zlQ6kqgC&lpg=PA81&ots=aXWadwS06f&dq=salicylate%2Bdermatitis%20herpetiformis&pg=PA82#v=onepage&q=salicylate+dermatitis%20herpetiformis&f=false

not exactly sure... but i HAVE always heard that it can resemble Herpes (i imagine both Herpes, & Shingles).. that's where the name "Herpetiformis" came from.. the shingles (herpes zoster) pic on wikipedia looks fairly similar to the dh i had on my stomach

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Have any of you seen the descriptions in this book: Essentials of diseases of the skin By Henry Weightman Stelwagon?

Its the ONLY description like this on the appearance of DH I've ever read.

http://books.google.com/books?id=u8D9zlQ6kqgC&lpg=PA81&ots=aXWadwS06f&dq=salicylate%2Bdermatitis%20herpetiformis&pg=PA82#v=onepage&q=salicylate+dermatitis%20herpetiformis&f=false

This book looks to be more than 50 years old--scroll back to the first part and there is a stamp that says 1955.

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Yes, but I'm pretty sure doctors could SEE back then.

You still see mentions of how DH can look different, bit never described in this detail.

I think it's a great reference for those who think their DH must look a certain way.

I noticed mine looks different - over time and by location.

Some docs will be more concerned with a look rather than an act.

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When I found this I thought it was interesting there were so many descriptions and varieties of DH compared to what is commonly described and is "usual" today. Yes, it's an old resource but it's also a very respected one that is, I believe, still used today.

It does pre-date knowing what causes DH - the gluten part or salicylates or anything else.

I think it's particularly interesting that it can cause death (I'd add homicide to that, but that's just my opinion).

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My hubs & I are just sitting here with mouths agape at this! This guy "GETS" it! He's got it all down --- he nails it. It's such a revelation to see it written about in such informed detail. I'm over the moon that you found this & posted it Prickly. This should be made a sticky & stay at the top of the dh topic.

This is phenomenal Prickly. THANK YOU!

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My hubs & I are just sitting here with mouths agape at this! This guy "GETS" it! He's got it all down --- he nails it. It's such a revelation to see it written about in such informed detail. I'm over the moon that you found this & posted it Prickly. This should be made a sticky & stay at the top of the dh topic.

This is phenomenal Prickly. THANK YOU!

You're quite welcome. I wish the same author could revisit the subject with present day knowledge. I'm sure it would change, but surely the keen observations would stay intact.

What struck me was how different the language is compared to what we find online (I haven't dug through modern medical texts). And there's so much DESCRIPTION and detail.

This book was reviewed in 2007. Look what they have to say: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/17942031/

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You're quite welcome. I wish the same author could revisit the subject with present day knowledge. I'm sure it would change, but surely the keen observations would stay intact.

What struck me was how different the language is compared to what we find online (I haven't dug through modern medical texts). And there's so much DESCRIPTION and detail.

This book was reviewed in 2007. Look what they have to say: http://www.ncbi.nlm....ubmed/17942031/

Yes, I quite agree. I wish he were with us today so he could expound on his findings. You're right -- the description & detail are astounding. WHY haven't we seen this text incorporated into the stuff we find online? WHY?!!! It verifies what so many of us have been saying for so long simply through our own observations & chatter with each other. We knew we were right but we couldn't PROVE it with medical references. This guy did all this in 1916!!!!!!! It's amazing!

Reading his descriptions & conclusions, I felt like I was reading the story of my dh. I'm sure you felt the same. People need to print that whole part about dh out & take it to their derm when they go to see them about dh.

Quite an impressive review & even more impressive considering it was reviewed almost 100 years later!

What a find Prickly, what a phenomenal find! Great sleuthing!!!!!!smile.gifsmile.gifsmile.gifsmile.gifsmile.gifsmile.gifsmile.gifsmile.gifsmile.gif

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I was asked to add this additional info about having a rash and having a gluten issue. These are my personal observations based on my readings and experience.

1) If your rash responds to gluten, it is a gluten-related rash.

2) You can try to biopsy it, but a negative result does not mean it isn't DH or a gluten related rash.

3) Most gluten rashes have a related component: salicylates, amines, iodine, msg's, etc.

4) A gluten rash can pop up at any time.

5) Gluten rashes are trending on this board to being the FIRST sign or a LATTER sign (or both).

6) You can have more than one type gluten related rash (judging by the varying dx's on the board).

7) DH does "morph" over time. I saw it , as have many others, and this makes it very hard to dx.

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I was asked to add this additional info about having a rash and having a gluten issue. These are my personal observations based on my readings and experience.

1) If your rash responds to gluten, it is a gluten-related rash.

2) You can try to biopsy it, but a negative result does not mean it isn't DH or a gluten related rash.

3) Most gluten rashes have a related component: salicylates, amines, iodine, msg's, etc.

4) A gluten rash can pop up at any time.

5) Gluten rashes are trending on this board to being the FIRST sign or a LATTER sign (or both).

6) You can have more than one type gluten related rash (judging by the varying dx's on the board).

7) DH does "morph" over time. I saw it , as have many others, and this makes it very hard to dx.

Hi Pricklypear,

My personal experience and opinion agrees with you. A great summary for new comers ! (((oh how I feel for them)))

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The book was written in 1916 but is still a valuable resource, according to the study from 2007.

Just FYI :)

"DH was first described by Dr. Louis Duhring in 1884, four years before Samuel Gee made sense of the "coeliac affliction".

In 1967 Janet Marks of England discovered the link between intestinal biopsy and skin biopsy results of DH patients."

(Green and Jones)

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Thank you for posting this

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If you wish to add to this discussion, please start a topic in this forum, and refer to this thread. The Multi-quote function will allow you to cite a post here in another topic. I will merge it into this discussion.

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