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Mcflurries?


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31 replies to this topic

#16 butterfl8

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Posted 05 September 2011 - 07:48 AM

When I was newly diagnosed, my GI doctor said that the part of the villi that produce lactase (which digests lactose in dairy) is at the very tip. It is the first part of the villi that is damaged, but is also the first part that comes back. That said, he recommended that I avoid all dairy products for about 6 months to give that part of my villi time to heal so I could properly digest milk products again without . . . well, pain, discomfort, misery, you get the picture! After about 3 or 4 months I could start eating small amounts of dairy with lact-aid pills, and within another 4-6 weeks everything was back to normal. So if you can pinpoint the difference between a gluten reaction and a dairy reaction, that may give you a clue as to whether the McFlurrys are going to (eventually) be okay, or if they are a no go for you. Please don't try to intentially gluten yourself!! That would be miserable! But if you happen to get cross-contaminated, take note of your reactions. Knowing what reaction I get from what product has helped me recognize new ... stuff. Take care!
-Daisy
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#17 Lisa

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Posted 05 September 2011 - 01:56 PM

How does one know the source of the glucose syrup on this label? Is there any assurance that it is NOT derived from wheat? And if glucose and dextrose are highly processed, do they fall into an exemption category because there is theoretically no protein left? I could not find any exemption language in the FDA stuff I reviewed, but there is a lot of information to sort through. Thanks!


If the glucose syrup was derived from wheat, it by law, must be listed at GLUCOSE SYRUP (Wheat). If it does not indicate wheat, its derived by something other....In the US.

The offending protein is removed during processing and it's my understanding that any remaining protein would not be detectable. It's not one level of processing, but several.

http://surefoodslivi...up-gluten-free/

"Conclusions: Wheat-based starch hydrolysates, glucose syrups and maltodextrins did not have harmful effect on coeliac disease patients. Coeliac patients can thus safely continue to consume these products."
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#18 T.H.

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Posted 05 September 2011 - 08:59 PM

http://surefoodsliving.com/2008/09/is-glucose-syrup-gluten-free/

"Conclusions: Wheat-based starch hydrolysates, glucose syrups and maltodextrins did not have harmful effect on coeliac disease patients. Coeliac patients can thus safely continue to consume these products."


I'll be honest, I haven't yet read anything that makes me feel that the matter has been adequately studied. The study from Finland that is often sited as evidence of the safety of wheat starch hydrolysates has some unfortunate flaws. So do other studies I've seen on safe gluten levels, and they all have potentially skewed the numbers to a higher gluten threshold.

The participants in the Finnish study were chosen from celiacs who were in clinical remission in Finland in 2004 and 2005. At that point, the gluten free standard for gluten free food in Finland was <200 ppm. So the study's results are only a reliable measure of safety for any celiac who can heal while eating a diet of 200 ppm of gluten or less.

Not everyone can tolerate that level of gluten. People here in the sensitive forum often can't tolerate foods with a 20 ppm concentration, so I don't think results from a study of celiacs who can tolerate 200 ppm are as useful for us. Nice to know that some people are safe with it, yeah, but not universally applicable to all celiacs, IMHO.
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#19 HardcoreDior

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Posted 28 May 2012 - 03:02 PM

It's probably not cross contamination. It's probably Whey.

Many people diagnosed with gluten intolerance or celiac also cross react to Whey.

I do, and I found out because I was reacting to things like ice cream and some cheeses, but not milk or yogurt. I read up on it and asked around and found out that anything with Whey listed in the first few ingredients I react to.

I would suggest avoiding Whey.
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#20 kareng

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Posted 28 May 2012 - 03:18 PM

It's probably not cross contamination. It's probably Whey.

Many people diagnosed with gluten intolerance or celiac also cross react to Whey.

I do, and I found out because I was reacting to things like ice cream and some cheeses, but not milk or yogurt. I read up on it and asked around and found out that anything with Whey listed in the first few ingredients I react to.

I would suggest avoiding Whey.



Whey is from milk. Not sure what your definition of " cross react" is but whey is not gluten. Many people, some with Celiac , have an inability to digest it. For many, when they have healed thier intestines, they can add it back in.
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#21 modiddly16

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Posted 30 May 2012 - 04:59 AM

I know that this is an old post but I find it odd that you'd suggest someone avoiding whey because they reacted to a McFlurry. I would say it's highly likely that it was cross contamination based on the flavors that McDonald's now has of McFlurries. The Oreo one is their most popular. They used to have a lot of different flavors but now I think they have 3 or so. I also am curious about your term "cross react" Whey is from milk, not a celiac thing.
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#22 ChristineWas

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Posted 20 August 2012 - 01:49 PM

Though this is an old thread, I know my Internet searches often lead me to really old threads on celiac.com, so I am going to comment anyway.

Cross-contamination from the machine IS a very likely scenario. I worked at McD's when I was in high school and would guess that the McFlurry machine still hasn't changed in all those years. While they do use a separate spoon to do the actual mixing, I can tell you that little bits of cookie still get all over the place. I know this from cleaning the machine. So, bits of Oreo could stick to the area above where the spoon is attached and then fall in while a new one is being mixed. Also, the containers where the add-ins (Oreo, etc) are stored is a potential risk for cross contamination. And, the employees who touch a spoon to make a mcflurry are likely touching many other gluten-containing things. Things like crumbs have a way of getting around.

In summary: don't rule out cross contamination, even though they do mix it with a new, theoretically clean spoon.
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#23 modiddly16

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 06:35 AM

No one ruled out cross contamination. We weren't sure why they were telling people to avoid whey.
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#24 Finally@45

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Posted 22 August 2012 - 06:44 AM

I'm pretty sure this is the SAME problem I had. I later found out that I'm intolerant to corn. Anything with corn syrup, starch, etc. gives me the same symptoms as gluten.

The gastro did tell me that I likely have IBS that is triggered by fructose, so I'm checking into that now.

Once I cut corn, I felt SO much better.

I sighed to not have the Mcdonalds drinks and desserts too.
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#25 dilettantesteph

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Posted 03 September 2012 - 06:34 PM

Gluten free really should mean 100% GLUTEN FREE. <_<

Unfortunately, there aren't any tests that would tell us that.
There are more sensitive tests than 20 ppm though.
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#26 Finally@45

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Posted 07 September 2012 - 05:45 AM

More from me...

Getting on a strict regimen to completely eliminate corn (which is much, much, much harder than gluten because it's not regulated) made me feel the healthiest I've ever felt in my life. It's worth your effort if you have the same problem, even if you have to give away $50 worth of vitamins and eat really plain, "whole" food at restaurants.

I am not lactose intolerant (though I do primarily use Lactaid or rice milk because I was told to keep lactose under control), so if I need a dairy fix, I now go to the frozen yogurt or gelatto places that don't use corn syrup and are gluten and dextrin free. I tend to avoid the toppings since the gastro told me to be as paranoid as possible about cross contamination since really minute amounts of corn are setting off my anapyhlaxis. A little more expensive than McDonald's, but worth it. I think yogurt and kefir are low in lactose anyway? Costco's Kirkland brand ice cream is corn syrup and gluten free, I just don't like having a gallon of ice cream in the house! Otherwise, you'll find it hard to get corn/gluten-free ice cream in an avg. grocery store. Healthfood stores will work out. Just get your vanilla ice cream, a blender, and make your own flurries!
Besides corn syrup, you could also try watching your response to carmel color, corn vinegar, corn starch, and corn dextrin. It used to be mild responses for me, but one day in June, it was if all hell broke loose and I now can't tolerate any of them.
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#27 come dance with me

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Posted 07 September 2012 - 03:23 PM

Not sure if this has been mentioned, but glucose syrup (wheat) does NOT contain the protein that is gluten, but if you have a wheat allergy as well as gluten intolerance, stay away from their ice creams. My friend's little one was taken to hospital because they assumed "gluten free" meant "wheat free" and they bought a sundae, only to find out that it does have glucose syrup in it, making it gluten free but not wheat free. She does not have coeliac disease, so able to have gluten in other forms, just no wheat of any kind.
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#28 Bugman

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Posted 30 September 2012 - 12:43 PM

Not sure if this has been mentioned, but glucose syrup (wheat) does NOT contain the protein that is gluten, but if you have a wheat allergy as well as gluten intolerance, stay away from their ice creams. My friend's little one was taken to hospital because they assumed "gluten free" meant "wheat free" and they bought a sundae, only to find out that it does have glucose syrup in it, making it gluten free but not wheat free. She does not have coeliac disease, so able to have gluten in other forms, just no wheat of any kind.


This is incorrect

Here in the uk 95% of all glucose is made from wheat, as is malodextrin. They are highly processed which means that technically no trace of gluten remains.

That technically part actually means that upto 20ppm of gluten can remain as does some wheat proteins

The same exists with distilled vodka. There should be no gluten that comes across in the distillation but proteins do, hence thoose whom are super sensitive to it cant have grain derived vodka

It was either CC or the glucose syrup, I am betting the latta

There is no requirement in the uk to specify what the glucose is derived from because of the high processing involved. I believe this is now the same in the USA and its only though companies being nice that they list it

Rubbish isn't it

Jim
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#29 come dance with me

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Posted 01 October 2012 - 02:28 AM

This is incorrect

Here in the uk 95% of all glucose is made from wheat, as is malodextrin. They are highly processed which means that technically no trace of gluten remains.

That technically part actually means that upto 20ppm of gluten can remain as does some wheat proteins

The same exists with distilled vodka. There should be no gluten that comes across in the distillation but proteins do, hence thoose whom are super sensitive to it cant have grain derived vodka

It was either CC or the glucose syrup, I am betting the latta

There is no requirement in the uk to specify what the glucose is derived from because of the high processing involved. I believe this is now the same in the USA and its only though companies being nice that they list it

Rubbish isn't it

Jim


What I said is correct for Australian food standards.
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#30 GFceliacgirl

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Posted 01 October 2012 - 08:11 PM

There are soooo many products with the gluten free label that aren't really gluten free. I get so mad at companies just trying to jump on the gluten free bandwagon to make a buck! Check out the unsafe ingredients list on celiac.com.
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