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Sooooo Angry


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3 replies to this topic

#1 Googles

 
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Posted 02 September 2011 - 02:52 PM

I am so so so so angry. I went in today to talk to my professor of my practicum class. I gave him the dissability paperwork for the class, and then the letter that my case worker at dissability services wrote about my concerns for dealing with this in my practicum. This is the first time I've really had to deal with this in a work environment because I was diagnosed right before I left for grad school (after I had accepted the offer of admission and given notice at my 2 jobs). He is supposed to be there to help us negotiate with our practicum locations if there are any problems that develop. As such I was giving him more information that I would usually give to a professor about the rapid onset and asking him how I should bring this up with my adviser at my practicum. He stops me in the middle and is like, "are you sure you should be in this profession?" I had just told him that I hardly ever get sick, but that I need to be prepared for the worst case scenario (getting sick while working with a client). I don't know of a profession where this disease would not possibly be a problem, unless you work from home and have no deadlines. I work very very hard at not getting sick. How am I supposed to trust him to help if something happens if he thinks I shouldn't be working here in the first place? I don't know what I am supposed to do at this point. He even knew what I had when I had never even told him previously that i had a dissability. My department makes me so pissed.
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#2 pricklypear1971

 
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Posted 02 September 2011 - 03:06 PM

Hi there.

Well, I don't know what your practicum is... are you in a remote location without a restroom?

I understand its frightening to think about being in front of someone and projecting a professional demeanor (not to mention concentrating) when you've been glutened. I also understand you want to know how to handle it prior to it happening.

Sometimes, you just have to wing it. And while you're winging it pull pages out of Emily Post and use the most polite excuse you can to get to the restroom. If you must reschedule, you must reschedule. Life happens for any professional dealing with the public - counselors, doctors, etc.

As an example, my uncle is a professor and has many health issues. Sometimes he must excuse himself from class and tell them to just amuse themselves or do an assignment (mind, he has a lot of freshmen so this can lead to chaos). He also keeps his cell with him and will call his assistant to go tend to the class. And no, he has no shame or embarrassment about doing so (he's rather eccentric and charming).

Now, on the professional side of things - yes, you will experience discrimination. You will learn how to deal with "informing" people as you go along. You will also learn how to deal with people who don't care, and people who are jerks. You will also learn when to and NOT to inform people (sad but true).

My advice is to always prep your own meals when you have a meeting scheduled. That way, you greatly reduce getting glutened. Yes, it takes time and prep but it will pay off. Also, since your symptoms are D related you might try probiotics, digestive enzymes and some of those supplements designed to relieve stomach issues when glutened.

This is how I leave the house: snack, water, and whatever food I can foresee. I also have a pack of meds with me - lotions, potions, very soft wash clothes, and a clean shirt. Why a clean shirt??? Because that rash weeps like crazy if it pops up and makes it look like I'm a sweating fiend.
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Apparently there is nothing that cannot happen today. ~ Mark Twain

Probable Endometriosis, in remission from childbirth since 2002.
Hashimoto's DX 2005.
Gluten-Free since 6/2011.
DH (and therefore Celiac) dx from ND
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Responsive to iodine withdrawal for DH (see quote, above).

Genetic tests reveal half DQ2, half DQ8 - I'm a weird bird!

#3 Mdhriggin

 
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Posted 02 September 2011 - 06:26 PM

I am sorry you had such a negative reaction from your practicum supervisor. I supervise students in a clinical psychology Master's program, and I can't imagine ever having that reaction to a student asking me how to talk to a practicum site advisor about a disability, gluten-sensitivity or otherwise. If you are in the mental health profession (which it sounds like, but I could be wrong), what I would tell you (as I would tell my own students) is that if you end up having a reaction in front of your clients, just be honest about it. People seeking help from those in the helping professions often like to know that their helpers are also human. You can model for them a healthy way of dealing with an obstacle, which can only serve as a help to them. As for your practicum site advisor, just be honest with them about it, and let them know that for the most part it can be controlled but you never know when that cross-contamination can happen, especially when there are shared food spaces. If you can be open, honest, and professional, then that's the best you can do. And if you ever have to leave a client because of a reaction, just use it as a teaching moment. As for your supervisor, maybe you should be asking him if he should be in his profession!
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#4 Googles

 
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Posted 05 September 2011 - 05:18 PM

I am sorry you had such a negative reaction from your practicum supervisor. I supervise students in a clinical psychology Master's program, and I can't imagine ever having that reaction to a student asking me how to talk to a practicum site advisor about a disability, gluten-sensitivity or otherwise. If you are in the mental health profession (which it sounds like, but I could be wrong), what I would tell you (as I would tell my own students) is that if you end up having a reaction in front of your clients, just be honest about it. People seeking help from those in the helping professions often like to know that their helpers are also human. You can model for them a healthy way of dealing with an obstacle, which can only serve as a help to them. As for your practicum site advisor, just be honest with them about it, and let them know that for the most part it can be controlled but you never know when that cross-contamination can happen, especially when there are shared food spaces. If you can be open, honest, and professional, then that's the best you can do. And if you ever have to leave a client because of a reaction, just use it as a teaching moment. As for your supervisor, maybe you should be asking him if he should be in his profession!


Thank you very much for your reply. It really helps knowing that there are other advisers out there who are more supportive of their students. I will take your advice when I talk to my practicum site adviser. I hope I get the same type of response you would provide to your students when I talk to him. Thank you very much.
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