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A Tattoo To Symbolize The New Me


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22 replies to this topic

#1 Rebecca92

 
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Posted 14 September 2011 - 09:39 AM

Being diagnosed was a life changing moment for me and I want to get a tattoo to symbolize getting better and feeling better. I have no idea what to get or where I was thinking maybe getting it somewhere on my back or side. Any ideas?
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#2 captaincrab55

 
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Posted 14 September 2011 - 10:18 AM

I see so many people wearing wrist bands for different causes... I always wondered why they didn't just get it inked on??? I do understand some people not wanting ink, but figured someone would do it... So, maybe a Celiac wrist band???
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I'm a New Man Without GLUTEN!

#3 MJ_S

 
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Posted 14 September 2011 - 10:42 AM

You could do the gluten-free logo (gluten-free with a circle around it). The downside might be if the logo changes over the years (new FDA regulations, etc.) then it could look outdated. Or retro.
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Blood Tests: TTG IgA Negative / Total IGA Normal

Skin: Confirmed DH
Genetic: DQ8 & DQ6 Positive (DQA1*0301, DQB1*0302, DQA1*0103, DQB1*0603)
Free Of: Gluten 1/1/11, Dairy 2010, Soy 2011


#4 eatmeat4good

 
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Posted 14 September 2011 - 11:06 AM

A Phoenix rising up from a pile of wheat...this is what my son suggested when the question of a symbolic tattoo for Celiacs came up about a year ago. I thought it was perfect.
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Healing is a matter of time, but it is sometimes also a matter of opportunity.
--Hippocrates

#5 pricklypear1971

 
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Posted 14 September 2011 - 11:17 AM

I think tats are beautiful; however, you may want to be aware they are considered autoimmune triggers. On the other hand, if you're Celiac you've already been "triggered".
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Apparently there is nothing that cannot happen today. ~ Mark Twain

Probable Endometriosis, in remission from childbirth since 2002.
Hashimoto's DX 2005.
Gluten-Free since 6/2011.
DH (and therefore Celiac) dx from ND
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Responsive to iodine withdrawal for DH (see quote, above).

Genetic tests reveal half DQ2, half DQ8 - I'm a weird bird!

#6 mbrookes

 
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Posted 14 September 2011 - 11:18 AM

Before you get a tatto, remember it is permanant. How will it look when you are 65? Probably all wrinkled and sagging. Sure you want that?
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#7 pricklypear1971

 
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Posted 14 September 2011 - 11:26 AM

My Mom would take offense to that! Her seahorse is still pretty!
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Apparently there is nothing that cannot happen today. ~ Mark Twain

Probable Endometriosis, in remission from childbirth since 2002.
Hashimoto's DX 2005.
Gluten-Free since 6/2011.
DH (and therefore Celiac) dx from ND
.
Responsive to iodine withdrawal for DH (see quote, above).

Genetic tests reveal half DQ2, half DQ8 - I'm a weird bird!

#8 angel9165

 
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Posted 14 September 2011 - 11:38 AM

I actually did get a tattoo after my diagnoses. Some would question how relative it is but for me, since it was a colonoscopy that finally led to the diagnoses, it seemed to fit. I will let you figure out where I got it but it is a circle with the line through it in the middle is an arrow pointing down (to mean, exit only). Now of course it will be 9 years before the GI doc does another colonoscopy so he will get to see that (hopefully once I'm under and they roll me over..lol) but my dermatologist got a kick out of it when she did my head to toe skin check last month. :P I guess if, as I age, it sags, nobody but the person who sees me naked will know. ;)
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Diagnosed w/ Celiac disease on Sept 1st, 2010

#9 Skylark

 
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Posted 14 September 2011 - 11:52 AM

I think tats are beautiful; however, you may want to be aware they are considered autoimmune triggers. On the other hand, if you're Celiac you've already been "triggered".

Yeah, it's not recommended for folks with autoimmunity to get tattoos. They're kind of scary because there is essentially no FDA regulation on the inks. We're more prone to sensitivity and allergy than folks with normal immune systems and once the ink is in your skin there's almost no way to get rid of it. I wanted a tat about ten years ago, even had drawn my artwork, but red reaction is so common I decided not to do it.

http://rmcrayne.hubp...d-Toxic-Effects

That said, if you get one anyway I love the phoenix idea!
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#10 Rebecca92

 
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Posted 14 September 2011 - 12:33 PM

A Phoenix rising up from a pile of wheat...this is what my son suggested when the question of a symbolic tattoo for Celiacs came up about a year ago. I thought it was perfect.


I absolutely love that idea! I think that is what I'm going to go with. I know that all tattoos sag with age but I would never get a tattoo that I can't cover up if I need to.
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#11 eatmeat4good

 
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Posted 14 September 2011 - 01:04 PM

I would be so thrilled if you post a picture of it if indeed you do decide to get that tattoo!!!

My son will be thrilled too!

I might even get us both tattooed if you come up with a pretty one!

Hahahaha

You made my day!
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Healing is a matter of time, but it is sometimes also a matter of opportunity.
--Hippocrates

#12 bartfull

 
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Posted 14 September 2011 - 01:23 PM

I just looked it up, and while there is no wheat in tatoo inks, there is enough other stuff I would never want put in my body to keep me from ever getting one. Here is the info:

In the United States, tattoo inks are subject to regulation by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as cosmetics and color additives.[2] The FDA and medical practitioners have noted that many ink pigments used in tattoos are “industrial strength colors suitable for printers’ ink or automobile paint.”[3][4]

In California, Proposition 65 requires that Californians be warned before exposure to certain harmful chemicals;[5] tattoo parlors in California must warn their patrons that tattoo inks contain heavy metals known to cause cancer, birth defects, and other reproductive harm.[5]

[edit] Pigment basesManufacturers are not required to reveal their ingredients or conduct trials, and recipes may be proprietary. Professional inks may be made from iron oxides (rust), metal salts, plastics.[6] Homemade or traditional tattoo inks may be made from pen ink, soot, dirt, blood,or other ingredients.[3][7]

Heavy metals used for colors include mercury (red); lead (yellow, green, white); cadmium (red, orange, yellow); nickel (black); zinc (yellow, white); chromium (green); cobalt (blue); aluminium (green, violet); titanium (white); copper (blue, green); iron (brown, red, black); and barium (white). Metal oxides used include ferrocyanide and ferricyanide (yellow, red, green, blue). Organic chemicals used include azo-chemicals (orange, brown, yellow, green, violet) and naptha-derived chemicals (red). Carbon (soot or ash) is also used for black. Other compounds used as pigments include antimony, arsenic, beryllium, calcium, lithium, selenium, and sulphur.[5][7]

Tattoo ink manufacturers typically blend the heavy metal pigments and/or use lightening agents (such as lead or titanium) to reduce production costs.[7]

[edit] CarriersA carrier acts as a solvent for the pigment, to “carry” the pigment from the point of needle trauma to the surrounding dermis. Carriers keep the ink evenly mixed and free from pathogens, and aid application. The most typical solvent is ethyl alcohol or water, but denatured alcohols, methanol, rubbing alcohol, propylene glycol, and glycerine are also used. When an alcohol is used as part of the carrier base in tattoo ink or to disinfect the skin before application of the tattoo, it increases the skin's permeability, helping to transport more chemicals into the bloodstream.

[edit] Health concernsMain article: Tattoo medical issues
A variety of medical problems, though uncommon, can result from tattooing.

Medical workers have observed rare but severe medical complications from tattoo pigments in the body,[8] and have noted that people acquiring tattoos rarely assess health risks prior to receiving their tattoos.[9]



If it were me, I'd get a t-shirt made instead.
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gluten-free since June, 2011

Can't eat soy, corn, or foods high in salicylates.

Nightshades now seem to bother me too.

 

BUT I CAN STILL PLAY MY GUITAR AND THAT"S ALL THAT MATTERS!

 


#13 ravenwoodglass

 
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Posted 14 September 2011 - 02:27 PM

I absolutely love that idea! I think that is what I'm going to go with. I know that all tattoos sag with age but I would never get a tattoo that I can't cover up if I need to.


I like that idea also. Do keep in mind that you don't want red in the tat as that is the color that more folks will react to. I have multiple tattoos and don't regret a single one. I have mine in areas that are easy to cover and have a bit of 'meat'. Upper arms, thigh or butt are good places that are the least painful. Areas over bone like the inside of the shoulder blade, ankles, wrist etc are more painful. Go to a good artist and have them do at least a couple of drawings of the design for you to look at so you know they are actually an artist. The artist will use a transfer process to put the design on before inking so do get a good look at that before they begin. Look the shop over to make sure it is clean, make sure the artist uses new needles on you and nonpowdered gloves. Be aware that they do hurt. You will have 7 to 10 needles going into your skin at a high rate of speed. The outline will hurt the most and if you have to use 2 or more sessions for the addition of color make sure you give it a good month or two between sessions. A good tat is also VERY expensive. Expect to pay at least $250 and up for one. If you are getting a bargain tattoo you will regret it. Give it a great deal of thought as the only way to remove them is by laser and that will leave a scar and is a very painful process.
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Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

#14 Hungrylady

 
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Posted 14 September 2011 - 02:41 PM

I love the idea of celebrating the life changing moment. I have had my head down not paying attention to how drastically my life has improved! I think anything with a renewal touch would be good. A re-birth if you will. I feel like a million bucks today and all of us know how to appreciate days like that. When you're sick you feel worn out, old, dead, unable to feel alive. Once we've been gluten-free you feel free, alive, sometimes even electricfied. If I had to decide I might do a ligthening bolt into a hand or something that gives the thought of life. Maybe a bolt into the fountain of youth, lol.

I hope everyone continues to feel good and improve, live life and enojy it every day. Best of luck finding a tat, let us know how it turns out.
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#15 Poppi

 
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Posted 14 September 2011 - 03:14 PM

Before you get a tatto, remember it is permanant. How will it look when you are 65? Probably all wrinkled and sagging. Sure you want that?


All of me is going to sag. Since my saggy body is unlikely to be on public display when I'm in my old age I don't think a few extra decorations are going to matter much. All my tattoos (already done and planned for the future) mean something special to me. They have marked important events in my life. The births of my children (I have a tattoo for each of them), the loss of 3 unborn babies, marriage, life changes ... I love that my skin is becoming a visual story of my life. I think I'll cherish it just as much when I'm 80.
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Sara

Busy mom to 3 great kids (4, 8 and 18)

Gluten free since April 6, 2011 ~ Also sensitive to coconut, coffee and food dyes

Joint pain, mouth sores, back and neck pain, migraines, stomach pain, chronic fatigue, ADD and depression are all gone.
Wishing I had been diagnosed before celiac robbed me of the cartilage in my toes and the 3 babies we lost to miscarriages.





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