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Perfect Gluten-Free White/sandwich Bread


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95 replies to this topic

#1 MerrillC1977

 
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Posted 21 September 2011 - 11:24 AM

I did it! Through a little mixing and matching of various found recipes that I tried this past week, I have come up with what I consider to be the perfect basic gluten-free bread. It's a standard white loaf, and can be added to with nuts, seeds, spices, extracts, other grains, etc. to make it into different flavors and varieties.

This bread is good! Springy and nothing but positively bread-like in texture. No crumbles at all. Not cake-like in the least (you can even fold it in half without it breaking). Risen very well (it's at least the same size if not bigger than standard store-bought bread). And it has an even and mild flavor. It's great for sandwiches, toast, making into bread crumbs, french toast, croutons, etc....or lovely just eaten all by itself. I honestly don't feel the need to search or experiment any further with gluten-free bread recipes.

Oh, and Hubby 100% approves -- I even got a fist bump. He said that if I told him I made it by magic, he'd believe me. :)

I've also had several people tell me that they would not know this is gluten-free at all if I didn't tell them, and that it was easily good enough to eat all by itself (this second comment came from a co-worker who *always* toasts her bread and english muffins).

Here goes:

Posted Image

Ingredients
* 1 Tbsp. yeast
* 1 Tbsp. sugar
* 1 ½ cups warm water
* 2 ½ cups of King Arthur Gluten-Free Multi-Purpose Flour
* 2 tsp. xanthan gum
* 1 tsp. salt
* 3 large eggs
* 1 ½ Tbsp. oil
* 1 tsp. apple cider vinegar

Directions
1. In a small bowl, combine the yeast and sugar, and then add the water while gently stirring. Let this mixture sit while you mix the rest of the ingredients – bubbles and foam should form if the yeast is good.

2. In the bowl of your stand mixer, combine the flour, xanthan gum and salt; mix well.

3. In a third bowl, whisk the eggs, oil and vinegar until it’s all a bit frothy.

4. By this point the yeast mixture should be foamy, so you can pour the two liquid mixtures into the flour mixture.

5. Blend the dough with the regular stand mixer attachment for about 4 minutes on a low/medium speed, scraping down the sides once or twice.

6. Scoop the dough into a greased loaf pan. (Using a spatula sprayed with cooking spray helps this process along greatly - the dough will be sticky). Allow it to rise in a warm area until it’s a little shorter than you want your bread to turn out when cooked (I have found that it rises only an inch or two more while baking, so I let mine rise until it's above the top of the loaf pan before putting it into the oven -- and I suspect that the more you let it rise before baking, the less dense the final cooked loaf will turn out).

7. Bake at 375 degrees for 50-60 minutes.

16 slices
* 121 calories
* 3 grams protein
* 21 grams carbs
* 2 grams fat
* 0 fiber
* 134 mg sodium

Posted Image
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#2 GlutenFreeManna

 
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Posted 21 September 2011 - 11:34 AM

I did it! Through a little mixing and matching of various found recipes that I tried this past week, I have come up with what I consider to be the perfect basic gluten-free bread. It's a standard white loaf, and can be added to with nuts, seeds, spices, extracts, other grains, etc. to make it into different flavors and varieties.

This bread is good! Springy and nothing but positively bread-like in texture. No crumbles at all. Not cake-like in the least (you can even fold it in half without it breaking). Risen very well (it's at least the same size if not bigger than standard store-bought bread). And it has an even and mild flavor. It's great for sandwiches, toast, making into bread crumbs, french toast, croutons, etc....or lovely just eaten all by itself. I honestly don't feel the need to search or experiment any further with gluten-free bread recipes.

Oh, and Hubby 100% approves -- I even got a fist bump. He said that if I told him I made it by magic, he'd believe me. :)

I've also had several people tell me that they would not know this is gluten-free at all if I didn't tell them, and that it was easily good enough to eat all by itself (this second comment came from a co-worker who *always* toasts her bread and english muffins).

Here goes:

Posted Image

Ingredients
* 1 Tbsp. yeast
* 1 Tbsp. sugar
* 1 cups warm water
* 2 cups of King Arthur Gluten-Free Multi-Purpose Flour
* 2 tsp. xanthan gum
* 1 tsp. salt
* 3 large eggs
* 1 Tbsp. oil
* 1 tsp. apple cider vinegar

Directions
1. In a small bowl, combine the yeast and sugar, and then add the water while gently stirring. Let this mixture sit while you mix the rest of the ingredients bubbles and foam should form if the yeast is good.

2. In the bowl of your stand mixer, combine the flour, xanthan gum and salt; mix well.

3. In a third bowl, whisk the eggs, oil and vinegar until its all a bit frothy.

4. By this point the yeast mixture should be foamy, so you can pour the two liquid mixtures into the flour mixture.

5. Blend the dough with the regular stand mixer attachment for about 4 minutes on a low/medium speed, scraping down the sides once or twice.

6. Scoop the dough into a greased loaf pan. (Using a spatula sprayed with cooking spray helps this process along greatly - the dough will be sticky). Allow it to rise in a warm area until its a little shorter than you want your bread to turn out when cooked (I have found that it rises only an inch or two more while baking, so I let mine rise until it's above the top of the loaf pan before putting it into the oven -- and I suspect that the more you let it rise before baking, the less dense the final cooked loaf will turn out).

7. Bake at 375 degrees for 50-60 minutes.

16 slices
* 121 calories
* 3 grams protein
* 21 grams carbs
* 2 grams fat
* 0 fiber
* 134 mg sodium

Posted Image


That looks really good! Thanks for sharing! How is it the second day?
  • 0
A simple meal with love is better than a feast where there is hatred. Proverbs 15:17 (CEV)

#3 MerrillC1977

 
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Posted 21 September 2011 - 11:37 AM

That looks really good! Thanks for sharing! How is it the second day?

Still great! The positive comments I received from co-workers that I mentioned in my post were on the bread's second day. :D
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#4 Bubba's Mom

 
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Posted 21 September 2011 - 12:10 PM

I'm going to try this recipe! Thanks so much for sharing it. It sure looks good. :D
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#5 love2travel

 
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Posted 21 September 2011 - 12:20 PM

It does indeed look very impressive! Thanks for posting - will give this a try.
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<p>Confirmed celiac disease February 2011 from biopsies. Strictly gluten free March 18 2011.Diagnosed with fibromyalgia April 13 2011.3 herniated discs, myofascial pain syndrome, IT band syndrome, 2 rotator cuff injuries - from an accident Dec. 07 - resulting in chronic pain ever since. Degenerative disc disease.Osteoarthritis in back and hips.Chronic insomnia mostly due to chronic pain.Aspartame free May 2011.

When our lives are squeezed by pressure and pain, what comes out is what is inside.

#6 mushroom

 
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Posted 21 September 2011 - 01:01 PM

Alas, I am back down under so no King Arthur flour. I will have to guess/experiment with the proportions of the brown/white rice, tapioca, potato starch and see how it goes. That bread does look good!
  • 0
Neroli


"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

------------

Caffeine free 1973
Lactose free 1990
(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's
Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004
Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007
Soy free March 2008
Nightshade free Feb 2009
Citric acid free June 2009
Potato starch free July 2009
(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009
Legume free March 2010
Now tolerant of lactose

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

#7 love2travel

 
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Posted 21 September 2011 - 01:03 PM

We cannot get KA flour here, either, so will be doing some experimenting as well.
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<p>Confirmed celiac disease February 2011 from biopsies. Strictly gluten free March 18 2011.Diagnosed with fibromyalgia April 13 2011.3 herniated discs, myofascial pain syndrome, IT band syndrome, 2 rotator cuff injuries - from an accident Dec. 07 - resulting in chronic pain ever since. Degenerative disc disease.Osteoarthritis in back and hips.Chronic insomnia mostly due to chronic pain.Aspartame free May 2011.

When our lives are squeezed by pressure and pain, what comes out is what is inside.

#8 GlutenFreeManna

 
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Posted 21 September 2011 - 01:07 PM

Alas, I am back down under so no King Arthur flour. I will have to guess/experiment with the proportions of the brown/white rice, tapioca, potato starch and see how it goes. That bread does look good!


If you look at the King Arthur pizza recipe on their blog it tells you how to make a substitute for their multi-purpose flour blend. http://www.kingarthu...za-crust-recipe

From the link:

*Make your own blend
Many of our gluten-free recipes use our King Arthur Gluten-Free Multi-Purpose Flour, which includes ingredients that reduce the grittiness sometimes found in gluten-free baked goods. Our flour also increases the shelf life of your treats, keeping them fresh longer.

The following make-at-home blend, featuring stabilized brown rice flour, works pretty well when substituted; and it tastes better than a blend using regular brown rice flour.

Whisk together 6 cups (32 ounces) King Arthur stabilized brown rice flour; 2 cups (10 3/4 ounces) potato starch; and 1 cup (4 ounces) tapioca flour or tapioca starch. Store airtight at room temperature. Note: You can substitute white rice flour for the brown rice flour if you like; it'll make your baked goods grittier (unless you manage to find a finely ground version).


PS: I have made the sub mix and it works (at least for the pizza crust) but things will be slightly gritty unless you use a very finely ground rice flour. Also make sure you use potato STARCH, NOT potato flour.
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A simple meal with love is better than a feast where there is hatred. Proverbs 15:17 (CEV)

#9 mushroom

 
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Posted 21 September 2011 - 01:24 PM

Thanks GlutenFreeManna. Any idea what "stabilized" means?? :P
  • 0
Neroli


"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

------------

Caffeine free 1973
Lactose free 1990
(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's
Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004
Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007
Soy free March 2008
Nightshade free Feb 2009
Citric acid free June 2009
Potato starch free July 2009
(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009
Legume free March 2010
Now tolerant of lactose

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

#10 GlutenFreeManna

 
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Posted 21 September 2011 - 01:34 PM

Thanks GlutenFreeManna. Any idea what "stabilized" means?? :P


No idea! And I've never seen plain King Arthur "stablized" Brown Rice flour anywhere. I just used extra finely ground rice flour from my Asian grocery.
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A simple meal with love is better than a feast where there is hatred. Proverbs 15:17 (CEV)

#11 love2travel

 
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Posted 21 September 2011 - 01:41 PM

No idea! And I've never seen plain King Arthur "stablized" Brown Rice flour anywhere. I just used extra finely ground rice flour from my Asian grocery.

Stabilized flour just means that it has undergone a process (won't describe it as it involves chemistry and it was not my favourite class in university!) to enable the flour to be stored for a much longer period of time than unstabilized flour. I just store my flours in the freezer.
  • 0
<p>Confirmed celiac disease February 2011 from biopsies. Strictly gluten free March 18 2011.Diagnosed with fibromyalgia April 13 2011.3 herniated discs, myofascial pain syndrome, IT band syndrome, 2 rotator cuff injuries - from an accident Dec. 07 - resulting in chronic pain ever since. Degenerative disc disease.Osteoarthritis in back and hips.Chronic insomnia mostly due to chronic pain.Aspartame free May 2011.

When our lives are squeezed by pressure and pain, what comes out is what is inside.

#12 MerrillC1977

 
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Posted 21 September 2011 - 03:38 PM

Thanks GlutenFreeManna. Any idea what "stabilized" means?? :P

If you want to pay for shipping, I think you can order it online.
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#13 Februaryrich

 
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Posted 21 September 2011 - 07:01 PM

Wait, there's NO GLUTEN in this???
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Gluten free since 01/09/11
Food intolerance to be determined!

#14 mushroom

 
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Posted 22 September 2011 - 02:22 AM

If you want to pay for shipping, I think you can order it online.


Sure!!!! $10 for flour, $48 for shipping :blink: Think I'll wait till next year for King Arthur himself. :lol:
  • 0
Neroli


"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

------------

Caffeine free 1973
Lactose free 1990
(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's
Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004
Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007
Soy free March 2008
Nightshade free Feb 2009
Citric acid free June 2009
Potato starch free July 2009
(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009
Legume free March 2010
Now tolerant of lactose

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

#15 freeatlast

 
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Posted 22 September 2011 - 02:45 AM

KROGER HAS IT. If they have just regular, not gluten-free, just ask store manager to order for you :)
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Proofreader, copy editor, herb gardener and an evolving gluten-free cook.

Had a reaction to wheat, oats, rye, and barley in a lab test done by a homeopathic doctor in 1997. Have been mostly gluten-free since then. Also highly allergic to MSG.

Here's a quote I ran across when researching self-advocacy for children with special needs that I like: "Our subconscious picks up on each positive action we take on our own behalf, lifting the spirit and deepening our self-respect." Kat James




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