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Perfect Gluten-Free White/sandwich Bread
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96 posts in this topic

I did it! Through a little mixing and matching of various found recipes that I tried this past week, I have come up with what I consider to be the perfect basic gluten-free bread. It's a standard white loaf, and can be added to with nuts, seeds, spices, extracts, other grains, etc. to make it into different flavors and varieties.

This bread is good! Springy and nothing but positively bread-like in texture. No crumbles at all. Not cake-like in the least (you can even fold it in half without it breaking). Risen very well (it's at least the same size if not bigger than standard store-bought bread). And it has an even and mild flavor. It's great for sandwiches, toast, making into bread crumbs, french toast, croutons, etc....or lovely just eaten all by itself. I honestly don't feel the need to search or experiment any further with gluten-free bread recipes.

Oh, and Hubby 100% approves -- I even got a fist bump. He said that if I told him I made it by magic, he'd believe me. :)

I've also had several people tell me that they would not know this is gluten-free at all if I didn't tell them, and that it was easily good enough to eat all by itself (this second comment came from a co-worker who *always* toasts her bread and english muffins).

Here goes:

IMG_6616.JPG

Ingredients

* 1 Tbsp. yeast

* 1 Tbsp. sugar

* 1 ½ cups warm water

* 2 ½ cups of King Arthur Gluten-Free Multi-Purpose Flour

* 2 tsp. xanthan gum

* 1 tsp. salt

* 3 large eggs

* 1 ½ Tbsp. oil

* 1 tsp. apple cider vinegar

Directions

1. In a small bowl, combine the yeast and sugar, and then add the water while gently stirring. Let this mixture sit while you mix the rest of the ingredients bubbles and foam should form if the yeast is good.

2. In the bowl of your stand mixer, combine the flour, xanthan gum and salt; mix well.

3. In a third bowl, whisk the eggs, oil and vinegar until its all a bit frothy.

4. By this point the yeast mixture should be foamy, so you can pour the two liquid mixtures into the flour mixture.

5. Blend the dough with the regular stand mixer attachment for about 4 minutes on a low/medium speed, scraping down the sides once or twice.

6. Scoop the dough into a greased loaf pan. (Using a spatula sprayed with cooking spray helps this process along greatly - the dough will be sticky). Allow it to rise in a warm area until its a little shorter than you want your bread to turn out when cooked (I have found that it rises only an inch or two more while baking, so I let mine rise until it's above the top of the loaf pan before putting it into the oven -- and I suspect that the more you let it rise before baking, the less dense the final cooked loaf will turn out).

7. Bake at 375 degrees for 50-60 minutes.

16 slices

* 121 calories

* 3 grams protein

* 21 grams carbs

* 2 grams fat

* 0 fiber

* 134 mg sodium

IMG_6618.JPG

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I did it! Through a little mixing and matching of various found recipes that I tried this past week, I have come up with what I consider to be the perfect basic gluten-free bread. It's a standard white loaf, and can be added to with nuts, seeds, spices, extracts, other grains, etc. to make it into different flavors and varieties.

This bread is good! Springy and nothing but positively bread-like in texture. No crumbles at all. Not cake-like in the least (you can even fold it in half without it breaking). Risen very well (it's at least the same size if not bigger than standard store-bought bread). And it has an even and mild flavor. It's great for sandwiches, toast, making into bread crumbs, french toast, croutons, etc....or lovely just eaten all by itself. I honestly don't feel the need to search or experiment any further with gluten-free bread recipes.

Oh, and Hubby 100% approves -- I even got a fist bump. He said that if I told him I made it by magic, he'd believe me. :)

I've also had several people tell me that they would not know this is gluten-free at all if I didn't tell them, and that it was easily good enough to eat all by itself (this second comment came from a co-worker who *always* toasts her bread and english muffins).

Here goes:

IMG_6616.JPG

Ingredients

* 1 Tbsp. yeast

* 1 Tbsp. sugar

* 1

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That looks really good! Thanks for sharing! How is it the second day?

Still great! The positive comments I received from co-workers that I mentioned in my post were on the bread's second day. :D

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I'm going to try this recipe! Thanks so much for sharing it. It sure looks good. :D

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It does indeed look very impressive! Thanks for posting - will give this a try.

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Alas, I am back down under so no King Arthur flour. I will have to guess/experiment with the proportions of the brown/white rice, tapioca, potato starch and see how it goes. That bread does look good!

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We cannot get KA flour here, either, so will be doing some experimenting as well.

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Alas, I am back down under so no King Arthur flour. I will have to guess/experiment with the proportions of the brown/white rice, tapioca, potato starch and see how it goes. That bread does look good!

If you look at the King Arthur pizza recipe on their blog it tells you how to make a substitute for their multi-purpose flour blend. http://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/gluten-free-pizza-crust-recipe

From the link:

*Make your own blend

Many of our gluten-free recipes use our King Arthur Gluten-Free Multi-Purpose Flour, which includes ingredients that reduce the grittiness sometimes found in gluten-free baked goods. Our flour also increases the shelf life of your treats, keeping them fresh longer.

The following make-at-home blend, featuring stabilized brown rice flour, works pretty well when substituted; and it tastes better than a blend using regular brown rice flour.

Whisk together 6 cups (32 ounces) King Arthur stabilized brown rice flour; 2 cups (10 3/4 ounces) potato starch; and 1 cup (4 ounces) tapioca flour or tapioca starch. Store airtight at room temperature. Note: You can substitute white rice flour for the brown rice flour if you like; it'll make your baked goods grittier (unless you manage to find a finely ground version).

PS: I have made the sub mix and it works (at least for the pizza crust) but things will be slightly gritty unless you use a very finely ground rice flour. Also make sure you use potato STARCH, NOT potato flour.

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Thanks GlutenFreeManna. Any idea what "stabilized" means?? :P

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Thanks GlutenFreeManna. Any idea what "stabilized" means?? :P

No idea! And I've never seen plain King Arthur "stablized" Brown Rice flour anywhere. I just used extra finely ground rice flour from my Asian grocery.

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No idea! And I've never seen plain King Arthur "stablized" Brown Rice flour anywhere. I just used extra finely ground rice flour from my Asian grocery.

Stabilized flour just means that it has undergone a process (won't describe it as it involves chemistry and it was not my favourite class in university!) to enable the flour to be stored for a much longer period of time than unstabilized flour. I just store my flours in the freezer.

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Thanks GlutenFreeManna. Any idea what "stabilized" means?? :P

If you want to pay for shipping, I think you can order it online.

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If you want to pay for shipping, I think you can order it online.

Sure!!!! $10 for flour, $48 for shipping :blink: Think I'll wait till next year for King Arthur himself. :lol:

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KROGER HAS IT. If they have just regular, not gluten-free, just ask store manager to order for you :)

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Wait, there's NO GLUTEN in this???

Correctamundo! :)

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Sure!!!! $10 for flour, $48 for shipping :blink: Think I'll wait till next year for King Arthur himself. :lol:

Well, I didn't check what the shipping prices would be. It was just a suggestion. Sorry.

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I am definitely going to try this recipe. I gave up trying to make my own when Udi's came out with their white loaf but If I can get almost 2 loaves from 1 box of KA flour it's worth a shot. I get my KA flour at Market Basket for $4.99 a box. It's $6.99 at stop and shop and other stores so it's worth trying.

Last time I measured it was 4.25 cups in a KA box, any suggestions for subbing a 1/2 cup of KA flour with something else to stretch the box to make 2 loaves?

Would 1/2 flax meal make it too gummy as there are 3 eggs already? or coconut flour ? looking to boost fiber content a little

any suggestions from you more experienced bakers

Maureen

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I am definitely going to try this recipe. I gave up trying to make my own when Udi's came out with their white loaf but If I can get almost 2 loaves from 1 box of KA flour it's worth a shot. I get my KA flour at Market Basket for $4.99 a box. It's $6.99 at stop and shop and other stores so it's worth trying.

Last time I measured it was 4.25 cups in a KA box, any suggestions for subbing a 1/2 cup of KA flour with something else to stretch the box to make 2 loaves?

Would 1/2 flax meal make it too gummy as there are 3 eggs already? or coconut flour ? looking to boost fiber content a little

any suggestions from you more experienced bakers

Maureen

See the flour sub suggestion from KA's blog (I posted it earlier in this thread). I would think you could just use 1/2 cup finely ground brown rice flour since that's what the majority of the flour is made from. Let us know if you try that and how it works. I need to price my individual flours out and figure out which way is a less expensive. King Arthur gluten-free flour cost 7.99 a box where I live--I have only ever seen it at Kroger.

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What sized loaf pan was used, and was it metal or glass ?

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What sized loaf pan was used, and was it metal or glass ?

It was a metal loaf pan, but gosh, I am not sure of the exact size....maybe about 8" x 4" or 9" x 5". It's the regular loaf pan that you get when you buy a set of Wilton oven pans. Like this:

2105-3008_m.jpg6978814738630P.JPG

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Wow, your bread looks good. I can't wait until I get a stand mixer.

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Wow, your bread looks good. I can't wait until I get a stand mixer.

You could probably do it without a stand mixer (just need a bit of elbow grease), or using a regular hand mixer, although I haven't tried either of those ways myself.

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Can't wait to try it. I just got on here to ask this very question about a good bread recipe and there it is. I am heading to the store today to find King Arthur and his court. Thanks and I'll let you know how it goes. Just one question for now... I don't have a good stand up mixer (but I can borrow one), but in the meantime do you have any other suggestions for mixing if I don't have one of these?

Thanks

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I made this last night and it's the best bread I have made so far and really it's because of the KA flour it's the most finely ground without special ordering it. I added a tbl flax meal and subbed a 1/4 cup coconut flour for 1/2 c KA flour (coconut flour swells to almost dbl it's size). It tastes great , I needed to go the full 60 minutes and didn't, I couldn't wait :) but otherwise really nice loaf.

I would suggest not borrowing a stand mixer if it's not from a gluten free home. Otherwise you can mix by hand, it just takes a lot of elbow grease. The batter is thick like cookie dough.

Sift the dry ingredients together really well first, make a well to add the wet into to incorporate them.

good luck

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