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Insoluble Fiber?


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15 replies to this topic

#1 Streetlegal

 
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Posted 27 September 2011 - 02:18 PM

Hi all

Long story short: for 18 months post diagnosis (celiacs + microscopic colitis) my biggest problem has been regulating diarrhea and loose stools (using Pepto Bismol when needed).

Over the last two months, my bowel movements suddenly changed to much more like a "normal" person--less frequent visits, firmer stools etc.

Unfortunately, perhaps because my body is so not used to regular stools, I have tended towards bouts of mildish constipation and resultant hemorrhoids (you just can't win!).

I have been taken fiber until it is coming out of my ears, but I am increasingly aware that the fiber most available is SOLUBLE (ie tends to slow down motions, bulk up stools).

What I really want is--for when the constipation strikes--some quick-fix INSOLUBLE fiber to get my bowels moving. I want a breakfast cereal to replace All Bran, Weetabix, Shredded Wheat. Unfortunately, most of this kind of fiber comes from wheat.

Any ideas???
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#2 ravenwoodglass

 
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Posted 27 September 2011 - 02:41 PM

Do you like sweet potatoes or yams? Those are a great source of both soluable and insoluble fiber. They are my go to for regulation. I like them best just cut up and boiled till soft then drained with some butter and brown sugar thrown on but they are also good baked or done as an oven fry.
There are also some good gluten free granolas out there. Udi's makes one and I like Bakery on Main if your looking just for a cereal.
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Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

#3 Roda

 
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Posted 27 September 2011 - 02:47 PM

Prunes and mandarin oranges work for my boys.
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Me:
Celiac disease(positive blood work/biopsy- 10/2008), gluten free oat intolerent, Hashimoto's Thyroiditis/Disease, Raynaud's Disease


DS2(age 9):
celiac disease(positive IgA tTG, no biopsy- 11/2010)


DS1(age 13):
repeated negative bloodwork and negative EGD/biopsy. Started on a gluten free trial(8/2011). He has decided to stay gluten free due to all of the improvements he has experienced on the diet.


#4 Streetlegal

 
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Posted 27 September 2011 - 05:53 PM

Thanks. I am eating all of these, along with beans, oats, veggies, nuts and fruit.

What I would really like to know is there a quick-fix (like a breakfast cereal) that is the equivalent of Al Bran, with massive doses of insoluble fiber.
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#5 Jestgar

 
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Posted 27 September 2011 - 06:01 PM

Maybe All Bran used to work so well for you because the wheat was attacking your intestine....
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#6 Streetlegal

 
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Posted 27 September 2011 - 06:45 PM

No. I just want to find an equivalent (cereal) with the same high dose of insoluble fiber. That's all.

If you check out lists of high soluble foods, unfortunately wheat-based products rule. There seems to be little else that touches it.
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#7 burdee

 
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Posted 27 September 2011 - 07:03 PM

Hi all

Long story short: for 18 months post diagnosis (celiacs + microscopic colitis) my biggest problem has been regulating diarrhea and loose stools (using Pepto Bismol when needed).

Over the last two months, my bowel movements suddenly changed to much more like a "normal" person--less frequent visits, firmer stools etc.

Unfortunately, perhaps because my body is so not used to regular stools, I have tended towards bouts of mildish constipation and resultant hemorrhoids (you just can't win!).

I have been taken fiber until it is coming out of my ears, but I am increasingly aware that the fiber most available is SOLUBLE (ie tends to slow down motions, bulk up stools).

What I really want is--for when the constipation strikes--some quick-fix INSOLUBLE fiber to get my bowels moving. I want a breakfast cereal to replace All Bran, Weetabix, Shredded Wheat. Unfortunately, most of this kind of fiber comes from wheat.

Any ideas???


With my other diagnosed allergies, I can't eat most gluten free dry cereals. However I love cooked cereals to which I add rice bran (Ener-G Foods) and/or ground flax meal. I like Bob's Red Mill's Mighty Tasty (gluten-free blend) or Buckwheat. Sometimes I get bulk Amaranth cereal at Whole Foods and mix it with the Mighty Tasty and Buckwheat. I cook those cereals in nut milks (almond or Hazelnut) and add almond butter (for extra fats) and chopped fruit (pears, strawberries, blueberries).

However, I've read just the opposite about soluble vs. insoluble fiber. Soluble tends to soak up liquids and keep stools softer. Whereas insoluble fiber can create very hard, but also fibrous stools.

You may have other autoimmune problems which cause your constipation, now that you don't eat gluten. I ate tons of soluable and insoluble fiber for years and struggled with constipation until I was diagnosed with (and treated for) authoimmune (Hashimoto's) hypothyroid disease. Many celiacs also have autoimmune diseases. Ask your doc for thyroid blood tests (TSH, free T3, free T4 and TPOab). Most docs just do the TSH, but use the outdated 'normal' scale for TSH. So you can have abnormal TSH and thyroid problems, but docs will misdiagnose you as normal, based on that outdated scale.
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Gluten, dairy, soy, egg, cane sugar, vanilla and nutmeg free. Enterolab diagnosed gluten/casein intolerant 7/04; soy intolerant 8/07. ELISA test diagnosed egg/cane sugar IgG allergies 8/06; vanilla/nutmeg 8/06. 2006-10 diagnosed by DNA Microbial stool tests and successfully treated: Klebsiella, Enterobacter Cloaecae, Cryptosporidia, Candida, C-diff, Achromobacter, H. Pylori and Dientamoeba Fragilis. 6/10 Heidelberg capsule test diagnosed hypochloridia. Vitamin D deficiency, hypothyroiditis, hypochloridia and low white blood cells caused vulnerability to infections. I now take Betaine HCl, probiotics, Vitamin D and T3 thyroid supplement to maintain immunity.


#8 Streetlegal

 
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Posted 28 September 2011 - 12:18 AM

With my other diagnosed allergies, I can't eat most gluten free dry cereals. However I love cooked cereals to which I add rice bran (Ener-G Foods) and/or ground flax meal. I like Bob's Red Mill's Mighty Tasty (gluten-free blend) or Buckwheat. Sometimes I get bulk Amaranth cereal at Whole Foods and mix it with the Mighty Tasty and Buckwheat. I cook those cereals in nut milks (almond or Hazelnut) and add almond butter (for extra fats) and chopped fruit (pears, strawberries, blueberries).

However, I've read just the opposite about soluble vs. insoluble fiber. Soluble tends to soak up liquids and keep stools softer. Whereas insoluble fiber can create very hard, but also fibrous stools.

You may have other autoimmune problems which cause your constipation, now that you don't eat gluten. I ate tons of soluable and insoluble fiber for years and struggled with constipation until I was diagnosed with (and treated for) authoimmune (Hashimoto's) hypothyroid disease. Many celiacs also have autoimmune diseases. Ask your doc for thyroid blood tests (TSH, free T3, free T4 and TPOab). Most docs just do the TSH, but use the outdated 'normal' scale for TSH. So you can have abnormal TSH and thyroid problems, but docs will misdiagnose you as normal, based on that outdated scale.



Really helpful. Thanks a million--you have given me just the kinds of tips I need.

I agree that I may have over-simplified the differences in fiber, though I think there is some validity to what I say. I eat LOTS of fiber, but I do believe most of it happens to be soluble (oats, fruit, beans, veggies). Most of the time that is fine, as I tend towards diarrhea. For the occasional bouts of constipation, it is useful to have some alternative sources of fiber . . .

I don't think I have another condition. Part of my problems stem from that fact that I already have both celiacs AND microscopic colitis; the latter is very unpredictable, and tends to come and go on its own accord.

I shall pay a visit to Whole Foods and take a good look at their cereals. Thanks again.
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#9 Streetlegal

 
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Posted 28 September 2011 - 12:27 AM

I've just seen the Mighty Tasty Cereal Mix online--it looks like a great alternative to oats (my usual). I have never noticed it--do they sell it at Whole Foods?

Also, does flax meal tend to be gluten-free? I note that Bob's Red Mill carry this product, but wonder about cross-contamination?
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#10 ravenwoodglass

 
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Posted 28 September 2011 - 02:42 AM

Really helpful. Thanks a million--you have given me just the kinds of tips I need.

I agree that I may have over-simplified the differences in fiber, though I think there is some validity to what I say. I eat LOTS of fiber, but I do believe most of it happens to be soluble (oats, fruit, beans, veggies). Most of the time that is fine, as I tend towards diarrhea. For the occasional bouts of constipation, it is useful to have some alternative sources of fiber . . .

I don't think I have another condition. Part of my problems stem from that fact that I already have both celiacs AND microscopic colitis; the latter is very unpredictable, and tends to come and go on its own accord.

I shall pay a visit to Whole Foods and take a good look at their cereals. Thanks again.


Drop those oats for a bit and see if that helps. There are quite a few of us who don't tolerate those and they may be behind the issue you are having.
  • 1
Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

#11 Reba32

 
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Posted 28 September 2011 - 06:32 AM

the trick to fiber is to also ensure you are getting plenty of water. Fiber doesn't work properly without water. Especially if you're eating flax, or psyllium to try to keep yourself regular. 2 to 3 litres of water per day should help (coffee & tea can be counted in this, but not colas or artificially flavoured/sweetened drinks). High sugar fruits and juices will most likely contribute to more diarrhea rather than be helpful.

For extra fiber I eat flax meal (whole flax seeds are not digestible), and lately I've been putting chia seeds in my protein smoothie drinks. I also eat a lot of veggies. Per serving, the fiber content of vegetables and low sugar fruits is higher than grains. Avocado is a yummy source of fiber and lots of healthy fats and vitamins too. Bob's Red Mill Mighty Tasty Hot Cereal per serving has only 4g of fiber, whereas an avocado 13.5g, plus it has 34% of your RDA of vitamin C!

Don't fall into the old fallacy that grains are the only source of fiber, because they really aren't. Vegetables and low sugar fruits are, and always have been, a much better source. Most grain products these days are so highly over processed that their natural nutrition and fiber content are gone, and have had to be added back in. Any time you see "enriched" anything on an ingredients list means that during the manufacture of this product, they've taken all the good healthy stuff out, and then had to put it back in with fake replacement stuff that they want you to believe is good healthy stuff.
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#12 Streetlegal

 
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Posted 29 September 2011 - 12:02 AM

Helpful advice folks. It seems I am on the right tracks, but I have also found some useful alternatives to think about. I really appreciate your replying.
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#13 MJ_S

 
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Posted 29 September 2011 - 04:40 AM

Quinoa is another option. You can buy quinoa flakes to take the place of morning cereal/oats and it is high in insoluble fiber (about 1:3 soluble:insoluble) from what I understand.
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Blood Tests: TTG IgA Negative / Total IGA Normal

Skin: Confirmed DH
Genetic: DQ8 & DQ6 Positive (DQA1*0301, DQB1*0302, DQA1*0103, DQB1*0603)
Free Of: Gluten 1/1/11, Dairy 2010, Soy 2011


#14 GlutenFreeManna

 
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Posted 29 September 2011 - 05:30 AM

You mentioned you use Pepto Bismol. I just wanted to mention that Pepto works great for me when I have heartburn or a stomach ache BUT it tends to make me constipated and have harder stools (again great for D not so great if you tend towards C). So if you are taking it frequently it could be messign with your system too. I also agree with the PP advice about cutting back on carb-laden gluten-free foods and trying to go for more natural sources of fiber such as fruits and veggies with a healthy dose of good fat (avocado, coconut olive oil, etc). And try cutting out oats. Even the gluten-free ones bother some people with celiac.
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#15 Asharia

 
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Posted 01 October 2011 - 06:58 AM

I had the same problem you have.. what I have found works (and isn't too terrible) is Enjoy Life crunchy flax cereal. I mix in some nuts, craisins, and honey. Also I eat a lot of Trader Joe's fiberful bars.

What I really want is--for when the constipation strikes--some quick-fix INSOLUBLE fiber to get my bowels moving. I want a breakfast cereal to replace All Bran, Weetabix, Shredded Wheat. Unfortunately, most of this kind of fiber comes from wheat.

Any ideas???


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