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Absolutely Everything I Wanted To Know About Cd...
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Absolutely everything I wanted to know about celiac disease....

:)A doctor decribes celiac disease

:o WOW!!!.... this answered any and all of my questions!!!!! :lol:

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

nice! Thanks for posting that!

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Thanks for this Amandasmommy! Will be printing it to educate a few people :D

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Thanks! That is a really good one, I am sending it to my sister......

Karen

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Thanks!

I am going to print it out and give it to my hubby to read

--Maya

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Hi amandasmommy,

Thank for this link...what a great article!! :) So often I read medical articles that are written in such a "doctorly" manner. Since this one is so easy to understand

I'm going to send it to a few family members that just haven't been able to get it, or refuse to believe they have it.

Wendy

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From the article:

"When somebody presents with severe diarrhea and wasting, that means most of the small intestine is damaged and it is not able to

compensate for the damage closer to the stomach. So it is the amount

of the small intestine that is damaged which determines the symptoms.

If you have all of the small intestine damaged you'll have diarrhea and

weight loss. If only a small portion of the small intestine is

damaged, you may have pain, bloating, and discomfort after eating but

not diarrhea."

This seems to explain why different people take different amounts of time to heal. I had NO idea that if you had diarrhea and weight loss that the damage was so extensive. I have to heal my whole small intestine! That's 26 feet of innards! I thought it was just the top part. No wonder it's taking so long.....

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WOW E WOW --- Wouldn't it be nice if we could all have this guy for our doctor? Someone who REALLY gets it. His patients are very lucky people, I hope they realize it.

Barbara

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Hey Shimma!

The best way to tackle 26 feet of innards is one foot at the time, eh?

;)

Most people, it "one day at a time", for celiacs, we measure improvement by the foot!!! LOL!! :P

Karen

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After reading this, I checked out more of Dr. Murray's writings. I like his policy about doing bone mineral density scans on his patients. If we can ever sell our house, I know which doctor I will be attempting to see. Thanks for pointing this out.

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your welcome. this explains so much more for me, and it will also help my family and friends too. i sent it to em all.

this also explains why amanda is thin and i am not. also before we found out about her having celiac disease we almost lost her, i know that now. she wasn't just skinny, she was boney, bloated stomach and steatoreah ( i hope i spelled it right) yea not just diareah. she was slowly starving to death, i was soo scared.

i do think more people need to hear about this, even test them selves. that is also why im trying to contact oprah. click hear to reply to my post on oprah.com. just page down to see mine.

did you see the percentages of having celiac disease? i bet the more people who test themselves the more common it will be!!!!!

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In fact, Dr. Marsh in Manchester (England)

has put gluten in the rectum and in a couple of cases he had DH

patients claim that they got an attack of DH afterwards.

~Hahaha! I had to laugh when I read this! OUCH!

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i do think more people need to hear about this, even test them selves. that is also why im trying to contact oprah. click hear to reply to my post on oprah.com.  just page down to see mine.

did you see the percentages of having celiac disease? i bet the more people who test themselves the more common it will be!!!!!

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Hey!!! I wrote to Oprah too saying that she needs to do a show on this!!!! I hope she does!

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Thank you!!! AMANDASMOMMY. That was excellent. I have made a copy for my husband to read. And the next copy is going to my daughters doctor. I have been trying to get her tested, and her doctor said he would have to do a colonoscopy to determined if she was a celiac or not. It makes me so mad that hes a md and totally clueless.

Anyway, that a whole another thread. Many thanks for the info.

:D:D Susan (GITRDONE)

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In fact, Dr. Marsh in Manchester (England)

has put gluten in the rectum and in a couple of cases he had DH

patients claim that they got an attack of DH afterwards.

~Hahaha! I had to laugh when I read this! OUCH!

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

They'll do that for some gluten challenges, instead of 3 months eating gluten. I don't know... sounds painful, but not as painful as 3 months of gluten! ;-)

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I having a few moments to do whatever, thought I would have a look at some old posts on this forum. I came accross this, and the referral to an article, which might be a little bit old, but I think it was great reading, and probably worth bringing back up again.

Cathy

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    • Hi Kasia2016, Yes, celiac disease symptoms can vary widely.  Some people have no symptoms, we call that silent celiac.  Other have difficulty walking (gluten ataxia), skin rashes (dermatitis herpetiformis), and thyroid disease (Hashimoto's thyroiditis).  The list goes on and on.  GI symptoms can vary widely too, from mild symptoms at times to severe symptoms.
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