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Jail/prison


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36 replies to this topic

#16 ravenwoodglass

 
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Posted 04 October 2011 - 04:01 AM

Interesting replies! Most of you say gluten-free would not be offered & you are probably right. What prompted DD to ask was that we were watching "Beyond scared straight" where teenagers are take to prison for a day in an attempt to set them on a good path in life. It made her think if celiacs would get proper food in jail? DD is a very good girl & would never go to prison but it cld happen--wrong place wrong time, you know anything can happen to anybody at any time.

The question would make an interesting research project for her. She could write to the dietary depts' head at a few prisons and see what their response is. I would think you would get quite a variety of different responses from different states and their local jails. For me both hospitals and the penal system would be scarey places to have to be.
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celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

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#17 kareng

 
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Posted 04 October 2011 - 04:03 AM

Let me get this straight--women are give heavy carbs to fatten them up?! IN mens prison they have a gym & weights to make them stronger--what's wrong with this picture??


I think giving men weights is not in favor in prisons any longer. A few years ago, I toured the new state prison before inmates moved in. It was considered state- of- the- art They don't allow them any exercise except walking. They can't even play basketball due to liability issues. It's hard to take care of an inmate with a cast on his wrist. They had a beautiful kitchen with many fryers. I think the fattening up of inmates may be applying to men too.
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#18 mommida

 
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Posted 04 October 2011 - 05:34 AM

The kid's pediatrician told me about her ex-brother-in-, he went to prison and got diagnosed with Celiac. He was a lawyer who got busted for "fixing tickets". He was probably sent to the nicest institution a lawyer could find.

Prison systems have come a long way. It really was a bread and water diet 1800's-1900's. Solitary confinement killed inmates slowly and cruelly. Left in the dark prisoners would go blind and the skin would grow pale and the did not even get hair or fingernail trims. When the laws changed and it was deemed less cruel to give someone the death penalty than leave them in solitary, they pulled the prisoners out of the dark. They died when exposed to the light(even though they had gone blind).

I think it would really depend on the state, and the prison, and what the crime was.
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#19 maximoo

 
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Posted 09 October 2011 - 12:30 PM

@mommida--it would be interesting to know if ped's bro-in-law was fed gluten-free while in his "country club" prison. Next time u visit the ped please ask.
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#20 mommida

 
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Posted 09 October 2011 - 03:21 PM

I believe he was fed a gluten free diet. He contracted Hepatitus (during his stay in the "country club"?), and passed away at a very young age. I think she said it was only 3 years in the clink.

She has retired from her pediatric office and now runs an emergency pediatric clinic.
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Michigan

#21 psawyer

 
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Posted 09 October 2011 - 05:07 PM

Note to self: "Stay out of prison."

Good idea. That said, occasionally the system makes mistakes and people are incarcerated pending the trial that ends with "Not Guilty." And, yes, I also know that "not guilty" does not necessarily mean "innocent." Just as "not gluten-free" does not necessarily mean "contains gluten." :unsure:
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#22 tlmcneal

 
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Posted 13 October 2011 - 02:54 PM

My DD asked me an interesting q today to which I couldn't answer. So I will ask you all here. If someone with celiac goes to jail or prison will they be given gluten-free foods or do they get what everyone gets? And if they are given gluten-free foods, are precautions taken to avoid cc?
Eager to read any answers.



I work for the Department of Corrections in my state....no gluten free diet, no exceptions.
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#23 maximoo

 
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Posted 13 October 2011 - 05:18 PM

@timmcneal: You say no gluten free foods no exceptions--what state are you in? Do you think other states would accommodate a celiac prisoner? What about minimal security country club type prisons? Jail is less than 1 yr & prison is 1 yr or more am I right? What if a prisoner had a peanut allergy would he be given a peanut butter sandwich?
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#24 GFofaGF

 
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Posted 04 January 2013 - 12:11 AM

Just to add a little updated light to this subject.

My boyfriend was sentenced to a correctional facility (jail with daily work release, more or less) today. His lawyer was pleading down the number of days and using Celiac's/Gluten Intolerance as a reason why he should not serve the full recommended 30 days. Well in the end, the judge ruled that Gluten Intolerances are very common now and that the facility would be able to support him. I have not heard from him yet how the food is or if they even make an effort to cater towards the gluten-free inmates but I will keep you guys posted. From what the Judge said, it sounds like they might in some places now.
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#25 Takala

 
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Posted 04 January 2013 - 07:26 AM

Perhaps the inmates needing a gluten free diet, should send the wardens the information from the media portraying the diet as a sort of horribly difficult regimen which is difficult to adhere to, is less nutritious, and doesn't taste very good. You know, a bit of reverse psychology using all the talking points by the wheat lobby we all know and love so much. ;) Judge: "I sentence you to 30 days of reading every label before you can eat anything." Lawyer: "But, Your Honor, that would take too much time.... " Judge "40 days, then, and mandatory dry commercial rice tapioca loaf at least once a day." "Lawyer: "Cruel and unusual...." Judge: "Quit now or it's bean flour and quinoa patty for breakfast." Defendant: (to Lawyer) "pssstt NO don't say anything else!"
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#26 Pegleg84

 
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Posted 04 January 2013 - 07:57 AM

Bwahaha! So true
Honestly, it would likely save the prison system money if they did make sure a Celiac inmmate stuck to the gluten-free diet, rather than spending extra on health care when they start getting horribly ill. Rice and potatoes really aren't that expensive. Boil. Serve. Simple.
I don't know what the situation is in Canada either. It would probably also depend on where it was.

Thankfully I've only been given hospital food once since going gluten-free, and that was unexpected (stuck in emergency for a good 8 hours. and they thought to feed me. I was pretty impressed actually). I think I only ate the peas, but it was a nice gesture.

I don't care what the crime. Forcing a Celiac to eat gluten is a cruel and unusual punishment.
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#27 kareng

 
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Posted 04 January 2013 - 08:31 AM

Just to add a little updated light to this subject.

My boyfriend was sentenced to a correctional facility (jail with daily work release, more or less) today. His lawyer was pleading down the number of days and using Celiac's/Gluten Intolerance as a reason why he should not serve the full recommended 30 days. Well in the end, the judge ruled that Gluten Intolerances are very common now and that the facility would be able to support him. I have not heard from him yet how the food is or if they even make an effort to cater towards the gluten-free inmates but I will keep you guys posted. From what the Judge said, it sounds like they might in some places now.


I would be curious to know how it goes for him. Does he have an actual diagnosis from a doctor? It probably depends on the actual jail. If he is going to his own job during the day and back to jail at night, he could get something he could eat during the day? Its funny how all you have to do is say that you have a religious reason to eat Kosher or Halal and a preferance for vegetarian and they have to accomadate you.
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#28 Adalaide

 
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Posted 04 January 2013 - 09:42 AM

#1 reason to keep homicidal tendencies in check? Can't control food in jail. :lol:

I wish I could find it again but there was a recent article about a local jail here in Utah. The inmates who are in for short(ish) periods of time and are non-violent offenders are put to work in the kitchen. They are taught a trade (more or less) working in the kitchen, it keeps them from having to pay kitchen staff to cook for a jail full of people. The jail keeps a garden that they also tend. They also prepare the meals for the local meals-on-wheels program, which the seniors absolutely love. Once or twice a month they'll bring a few of the seniors into the jail on a sort of field trip to see the kitchen and how their food is prepped, and to meet the men who do it. By all accounts in the story, everyone says the food is really great. They prepare meals for a variety of people on special diets, the men learn how to handle things like CC and the special diets. It didn't mention a gluten free or celiac diet, but it could be one of the special diets that they are prepping for.

Frankly I think the program is amazing. I think it is great to take the opportunity to put them to work, save money, and provide them with a skill that can help them get a job and hopefully keep them from re-offending. I think it is a model program that more prisons/jails should look at and emulate.
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#29 gatita

 
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Posted 04 January 2013 - 10:41 AM

Adalaide, that sounds like a win-win program. :)

I visit a lot of people in prison as part of my job, and it often involves spending en entire day with them in the visiting room. I have a heck of a time figuring out what to eat. It's the only "eating out" I do anymore LOL.

So far, I've only been glutened once, but I often just go hungry. Friends tell me the prison does accommodate celiac inmates. Apparently the diet is pretty much rice and more rice and some chicken. The thing they call a meat patty is off limits.
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#30 mommida

 
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Posted 05 January 2013 - 08:15 AM

I also think that prison inmates (that will be getting released) should have job training.

I did tour the ancient Jackson, Mi prison. that is now being refurbished to low income artist homes and sales studio spaces. The artist has home space on upper levels and the lowest level is workspace offices.

In the tour it was mentioned that the prison ran a farm. They produced ALL the food for the prison and SOLD the rest for PROFIT. The at one time they had one of the most popular jams and honey.
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