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Horrible Fatigue And Other Problems


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18 replies to this topic

#1 Austin Guy

 
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Posted 07 October 2011 - 05:31 PM

I will be gluten free for 4 months tomorrow. I thought I had things figured out regarding diet, etc, but lately have been getting extremely fatigued starting in the early afternoon. I drink a lot of coffee, but struggle to stay awake until 9:00 when I fall into bed and sleep for 8 hours. Mornings are relatively OK and I do work out then, but sometimes the fatigue starts early and the work out gets cut short or I blow it off. I've also been getting cold lately and I never used to get cold.

My diet is good, I am not gaining weight and don't see anything else going on aside from extreme fatigue and things associated with that like lack of motivation to do anything and having a poor ability to concentrate. Oh, my resting pulse is way down (60-74) and blood pressure has dropped quite a bit over the last 90 days.

Any ideas on what I should look for or have checked? Thanks in advance.
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Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant May 10, 2011 after going gluten free May 8.
Allergic to cat dander, salmon, nuts, lots of airborne pollens and mold.
Soy intolerance August 2011
Dairy and egg intolerance November 2011
Peanuts 2013
Titanium dioxide June, 2014

Bisphenol-A August, 2014.


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#2 rosetapper23

 
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Posted 07 October 2011 - 05:58 PM

Sounds like a possible thyroid problem to me--fatigue and feeling cold or hot are the most common symptoms. This is something that many celiacs end up suffering from. I developed it myself after being gluten free for three years.

It's easy to treat....and it just takes a blood test.
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#3 srall

 
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Posted 07 October 2011 - 06:01 PM

Well, I know others here will have advice for getting things checked, like thyroid or vitamin deficiencies. I did have to give up coffee (mostly) to feel better, and I feel best (like athlete form) when I am grain free, dairy free, soy free, drinking very little coffee and alcohol and taking B complex, iron supplement and 5000 iu of vitamin D/day. Plus...2 or 3 green drinks a day. It's a big commitment, but I if I'm off my formula, I just get run down really quickly.

Have you thought of other food intolerances, gluten sneaking in somewhere, or vitamins? I'd probably lose the coffee too. Good luck...others will reply soon with better advice, I'm sure.
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#4 AVR1962

 
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Posted 07 October 2011 - 11:36 PM

I know it may sound hard but you might try gioving up the coffee. I gave up all caffeine!
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Yesterday is not ours to recover but today is ours to win or lose!

Miscarriage, Kidney stones, Anemia, Pneumonia, Migraines, Restless leg, Bone fractures, Blurred/Double vision, Extreme fatigue, Bone & Joint Pain, Thyroid nodule, Celiac diagnosed 2011, Spine and leg bone loss, GERD, Vitamin deficiencies, Malabsorbtion, Neuropathy issues, Ataxia, Raynaud's Syndrome. Currently on diet with limited grain and sugar.

#5 Austin Guy

 
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Posted 08 October 2011 - 03:15 AM

I've tried cutting coffee - no help. I take vegan vitamins after figuring out a soy intolerance and finding soy in other vitamins. Looked for other food intolerances via an elimination diet and not finding anything. My diet has been very basic to try to keep possible offending foods out. Guess I may need to have thyroid checked.
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Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant May 10, 2011 after going gluten free May 8.
Allergic to cat dander, salmon, nuts, lots of airborne pollens and mold.
Soy intolerance August 2011
Dairy and egg intolerance November 2011
Peanuts 2013
Titanium dioxide June, 2014

Bisphenol-A August, 2014.


#6 GlutenDude

 
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Posted 08 October 2011 - 10:13 AM

Fatigue is my number one symptom. And when I say fatique, I mean can't focus, can't stay awake, absolutely drained of every ounce of energy in my body. But I do believe it only happens when I've been glutened. If I am fatiqued for a day or so, I figure somehow a crumb got into my food. But if I am glutened badly, my exhaustion lasts for months.

And keep enjoying the coffee. There is so much we celiacs need to go without, let's not give up things that aren't bad for us and that we truly enjoy.
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#7 AVR1962

 
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Posted 08 October 2011 - 10:26 AM

Not a bad idea. I actually had a growth on my thyroid which was found during a scan.....I was having a very odd cough that I could not relate to anything, terrible time regulating body heat and would have to climb into bed under lots of blankets with socks on with flannels for hours to get warm. I would choke easily, swollowing was hard for soups, of all things. But what happens is the growth presses on the thraot and causes issues like mentioned. I was fatigued and maybe that had more to do with the thyroid than I realized. I was relating it to the vitamins I have been taking and the progress I have been making with my gluten-free diet but that's hard to say as both came about at the same time. I have been on a med to shrink the growth for 5 months now and have noticed all my symptoms are gone so I'm kind of thinking the growth is at least smaller, if not gone all together.
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Yesterday is not ours to recover but today is ours to win or lose!

Miscarriage, Kidney stones, Anemia, Pneumonia, Migraines, Restless leg, Bone fractures, Blurred/Double vision, Extreme fatigue, Bone & Joint Pain, Thyroid nodule, Celiac diagnosed 2011, Spine and leg bone loss, GERD, Vitamin deficiencies, Malabsorbtion, Neuropathy issues, Ataxia, Raynaud's Syndrome. Currently on diet with limited grain and sugar.

#8 rosetapper23

 
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Posted 08 October 2011 - 11:27 AM

If you go in for the thyroid check (by the way, you can just call your doctor and ask him to send a request to the lab--no need for a doctor's visit), you might also request that your B12 and iron levels me checked, too. Even when following a strict gluten-free diet, these two nutrients can sometimes be lacking due to malabsorption problems that haven't completely resolved themselves. Low levels of B12 and iron can also make you feel extremely fatigued.
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#9 Austin Guy

 
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Posted 08 October 2011 - 01:16 PM

A family friend who is a nurse suggested it may be as simple as low blood sugar. She suggested this as opposed to thyroid as I am OK in the morning and decline in the afternoon. My diet has been animal protein and complex carbs with various vitamins and other supplements. Perhaps it is as simple of not getting enough carbs so I started taking honey several times during the afternoon and have felt better today. Coffee has been minimized also because I haven't felt the need. Wishful thinking or placebo? Time will tell. I'll start keeping fruit juice on hand and will try to maintain a steady level of blood sugar and see if that works.
  • 1

Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant May 10, 2011 after going gluten free May 8.
Allergic to cat dander, salmon, nuts, lots of airborne pollens and mold.
Soy intolerance August 2011
Dairy and egg intolerance November 2011
Peanuts 2013
Titanium dioxide June, 2014

Bisphenol-A August, 2014.


#10 rosetapper23

 
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Posted 08 October 2011 - 04:28 PM

Your family friend may be right--low blood sugar can make you feel shaky and cold, too. When I first found out that I had celiac, I would suffer from low blood sugar while working out....and I started eating a banana right before I exercised, and that helped. I no longer have to do that, though.
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#11 Roda

 
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Posted 12 October 2011 - 01:43 AM

Still wouldn't hurt to get the thyroid checked as well as your vitamin D, iron and ferritin. Along with the low blood surgar all of those I mentioned can cause fatigue.
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Me:
Celiac disease(positive blood work/biopsy- 10/2008), gluten free oat intolerent, Hashimoto's Thyroiditis/Disease, Raynaud's Disease


DS2(age 9):
celiac disease(positive IgA tTG, no biopsy- 11/2010)


DS1(age 13):
repeated negative bloodwork and negative EGD/biopsy. Started on a gluten free trial(8/2011). He has decided to stay gluten free due to all of the improvements he has experienced on the diet.


#12 dilettantesteph

 
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Posted 12 October 2011 - 03:31 AM

For me, horrible fatigue is a glutening symptom. I am a super sensitive celiac. You could also consider that possibility. To see if that is the cause, you go on a diet of produce and meat for a few days to a couple of weeks and see if you notice a difference.
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#13 Reba32

 
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Posted 12 October 2011 - 07:54 AM

Feeding a sugar imbalance with sugar isn't fixing your problem, it's just masking it temporarily. I would suggest rather stick to the diet you had, but eat smaller meals, more often. Like 5 or 6 times per day. Never skip a meal, and never go more than 6 waking hours without eating. Balance each meal with healthy fats, a moderate portion of protein, and controlled carbohydrates and this should help keep your glucose levels in check.

Whether hypoglycemic, or diabetic, keeping your blood glucose levels on an even keel, rather than spikes and crashes, is the ideal. And the best way to do that is to eat on a regular schedule, several times a day. And not with sugar.
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#14 GFinDC

 
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Posted 12 October 2011 - 01:31 PM

Getting your thyroid checked is a real good idea. I read somewhere that thyroid function normally decreases as people age, so declining thyroid function is the norm as we get older, not the exception. Hypo-thyroid symptoms are generally more even through the day though. That doesn't mean you aren't slightly below normal and having some symptoms from it.

The things that really knocked me for a loop blood sugar wise and blood pressure wise were soy and coffee. Stopping both of them made a huge positive impact on me. Thyroid supplements made an additional improvement. You could be having more than one issue is what I am saying, and it might take a change of more than one element to clear all of the problems.

I used to randomly pass out while sitting at the computer from low blood pressure. I had to keep drinking coffee or some form of caffeine to keep vertical, every 45 minutes to an hour. Stopping soy and coffee and starting thyroid supplements "fixed" me.

Another thing about thyroids is that most people develop thyroid nodules as they age. Over 90% of them are benign non-problematic nodules. so having a nodule doesn't mean you have cancer. Docs can do a procedure called a fine needle aspiration (biopsy) or FNA to take a tissue sample for evaluation. They just stick a thin needle in the thyroid and grab a tiny bit of tissue, no anasthetic needed. It just felt like a little pressure for mine. They also "palpate" the thyroid. Meaning they feel it with their fingers to detect bumps. Generally they stand behind you and feel the thyroid (front and sides of your throat about Adam's Apple level).

I had trouble swallowing food also, but not because of a bump, but because of low thyroid function. I do have a bump or two on my thyroid but for me food got stuck lower down. When I got on thyroid supplements that stopped happening. So I think it was muscle function that was impaired due to low thyroid.

I am in my 50's now.
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Proverbs 25:16 "Hast thou found honey? eat so much as is sufficient for thee, lest thou be filled therewith, and vomit it."
Job 30:27 My bowels boiled, and rested not: the days of affliction prevented me.
Thyroid cyst and nodules, Lactose / casein intolerant. Diet positive, gene test pos, symptoms confirmed by Dr-head. My current bad list is: gluten, dairy, sulfites, coffee (the devil's brew), tea, Bug's Bunnies carrots, garbanzo beans of pain, soy- no joy, terrible turnips, tomatoes, peppers, potatoes, and hard work. have a good day! :-) Paul

#15 Gfresh404

 
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Posted 12 October 2011 - 04:27 PM

I've tried cutting coffee - no help. I take vegan vitamins after figuring out a soy intolerance and finding soy in other vitamins. Looked for other food intolerances via an elimination diet and not finding anything. My diet has been very basic to try to keep possible offending foods out. Guess I may need to have thyroid checked.


Def get thyroid checked. Are you taking any digestive enzymes?

And do you vitamins have iron? Anemia can be a big factor in fatigue/weakness.
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