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My Mom Has Both Celiac Hladq Genes


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#1 alicewa

 
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Posted 11 October 2011 - 02:00 PM

My mom has both celiac hladq genes (hla-dq 2,8). Does this mean that I'd definitely have at least 1, both or none?
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#2 psawyer

 
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Posted 11 October 2011 - 02:37 PM

If I understand things correctly, you inherit 50% of your genes from each parent. So you have a fifty-fifty chance of having each one. Of the four equally likely situations, one has neither, one has both, and two have one but not the other. This assumes that your mother has only one copy of each gene. If she has two, then it would be impossible for her not to pass at least one on.

If I'm wrong on this, I'm sure one of our more knowledgeable genetics people will correct me.
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Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000.
Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986
Markham, Ontario (borders on Toronto)

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#3 Jestgar

 
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Posted 11 October 2011 - 02:46 PM

Yep, it's that old Punnet square from high school biology

You got either 2 or 8 from Mom, and one of whatever Dad has.
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#4 saintmaybe

 
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Posted 11 October 2011 - 03:26 PM

Yep, your Mom is what's called a super-celiac. She's a heterodimer for the two most commonly associated celiac alleles. You have either 2 or 8 and whatever you got from your Dad. It may be worth testing in yourself, because celiac genes are at a high rate of prevalence in the general population as well. Meaning, there's nothing that says you couldn't have inherited ANOTHER celiac gene from your Dad if he's a latent celiac. One copy on its own, which you know you have however, would be enough to *recommend* a gluten free diet.
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#5 alicewa

 
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Posted 11 October 2011 - 07:50 PM

Yep, your Mom is what's called a super-celiac. She's a heterodimer for the two most commonly associated celiac alleles. You have either 2 or 8 and whatever you got from your Dad. It may be worth testing in yourself, because celiac genes are at a high rate of prevalence in the general population as well. Meaning, there's nothing that says you couldn't have inherited ANOTHER celiac gene from your Dad if he's a latent celiac. One copy on its own, which you know you have however, would be enough to *recommend* a gluten free diet.


My mom doesn't seem to have celiac disease yet (unlike me). She's been feeling well and healthy to date. Is it likely (i.e. what are the chances) that she might become celiac?

Also is DQ2.5 different to DQ2?
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#6 saintmaybe

 
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Posted 11 October 2011 - 08:39 PM

My mom doesn't seem to have celiac disease yet (unlike me). She's been feeling well and healthy to date. Is it likely (i.e. what are the chances) that she might become celiac?



From what I've read, the highest associated risk understood AT THIS TIME in western medicine is with two copies of DQ2. In genetic parlance, this would make you homozygous for DQ2. Homozygotes for DQ2 who continue to eat wheat have a 30-40% chance of developing celiac disease over the course of their entire life.

DQ8 is the second most common allele associated with celiac. I can't find hard numbers associated with rate of disease onset, but know that it is associated with both celiac and type 1 diabetes. There are also risks associated with DQ8 and the development of rheumatoid arthritis. Again, none of this means that your mom WILL develop these diseases, just that it's *possible.*

I would highly encourage both of you to enjoy the benefits of a gluten free lifestyle, if possible.
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#7 alicewa

 
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Posted 11 October 2011 - 08:45 PM

Thanks for your replies. Just another question: Is it only possible for you to have two HLA-DQ genes?

(i.e. my mom has hla-dq2 and hla-dq8 does that mean she won't have any other hla-dq gene? (e.g. hla-dq3, hla-dq4, etc.)
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#8 MsCurious

 
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Posted 11 October 2011 - 11:31 PM

Thanks for your replies. Just another question: Is it only possible for you to have two HLA-DQ genes?

(i.e. my mom has hla-dq2 and hla-dq8 does that mean she won't have any other hla-dq gene? (e.g. hla-dq3, hla-dq4, etc.)


These links will help explain things to you. You only have two... one from mom ... one from dad.

You inherited either HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8 from your mom, and you inherited one gene from your dad (he has two but you got only one of his).

So essentially, you have one gene for sure that can predispose you to getting celiac disease... however that does not mean that you WILL get celiac disease... just that the possibility exists.

And if you have HLA-DQ2.5 rather than HLA-DQ2.2 you're in the pool of possibility ... but according to this recent study (below link)HLA-DQ2.2 is not a factor in celiac disease, unless it is accompanied by HLA-DQ2.5 (but not vice versa).

Now that you're sufficiently confused, here are the links. :)

(PS: DQ2.2 and DQ2.5 are both referred to in general terms as DQ2, however they have a significant difference that causes DQ2.5 to be directly related to celiac disease, whereas DQ2.2 is not unless it is accompanied by DQ2.5) Its all explained in the link. ;)

http://www.pnas.org/...0/21/12390.full


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HLA-DQ

Good luck to you! Hope you find the answers you seek.
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#9 alicewa

 
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Posted 12 October 2011 - 12:03 AM

Thanks for this. I'll have to give it more of a look into. My mom now plans to go gluten free to protect herself. What do you think about this idea?

Also is it more likely that I got the hla-dq2 or hla-dq8 ? I'm curious about the odds you'd come up with. :rolleyes:
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#10 saintmaybe

 
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Posted 12 October 2011 - 03:08 AM

Thanks for this. I'll have to give it more of a look into. My mom now plans to go gluten free to protect herself. What do you think about this idea?

Also is it more likely that I got the hla-dq2 or hla-dq8 ? I'm curious about the odds you'd come up with. :rolleyes:


According to the rules of random genetic assortment, you are equally likely to have DQ2 or DQ8. That is a 50/50 chance. Of course, there have been published accounts of nonrandom genetic assortment, but I'm not sure where the field is at in terms of celiac studies. For our sake, you should assume 50/50.
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#11 nora_n

 
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Posted 12 October 2011 - 07:56 AM

A large proportion of the general population has DQ2 and some less have DQ8, and only about 2-3% of the general population have ttg antibodies, so having these genes does not mean too much....

HLA DQ is about the risk of having celiac. The greatest risk is having a sibling with celiac and sharing the same DQ genes, tehn the risk is 40%.

Also, DQ genes are only responsible for celiac risk with 40%.

They have found 9 other genes that contribute to the risk for developing celiac.

Your mother might get better from things she did not know she had, after going gluten free.....
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gluten-free since may 06 after neg. biopsy symptoms went away and DH symptoms which I had since 03 got gradually better.
daughter officially diagnosed celiac and casein intolerant.
non-DQ2 or DQ8. Maybe DQ1? Updated: Yes, double DQ5
Hypothyroid since 2000, thyroxine first started to work well 06 on a low-carb and gluten-free diet
Lost 20 kg after going gluten-free and weighing 53 kg now. neg. biopsy for DH. Found out afterwards from this forum that it should have been taken during an outbreak but it was taken two weeks after. vitaminD was 57 nmol/l in may08)

#12 GlutenFreeManna

 
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Posted 12 October 2011 - 08:10 AM

The statistics say that immediate relatives of those with celiac (parents, children, or siblings) have a 1 in 22 chance of have celiac themselves. I don't know how this translates now that you know her genes but since you are diagnosed celiac your mom has AT LEAST a 1 in 22 chance of having it herself. She should get herself tested (for the antibodies) before going gluten-free, even if she has no noticeable symptoms.

http://www.celiacdis...sFigures v3.pdf
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