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Gluten Free Chewing Gum?


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10 replies to this topic

#1 alucard4545

 
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Posted 25 October 2011 - 09:17 AM

So Recently I emailed the company Wrigley which makes a lot of the gum products we're familiar with (Double Mint, Winter Fresh, Juicy Fruit, etc) and I asked which of their products are free of gluten. They basically gave me a list of what ISN'T gluten free, and that list is very small, everything else is fine to eat :lol: Here's the response:

Thank you for writing to inquire about ingredients used in Wrigley products.

All U.S. Wrigley products are labeled within strict compliance of applicable laws and FDA regulations, including the Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act of 2004. Any materials identified as allergens within this Act (milk, eggs, fish, crustacean shellfish, tree nuts, peanuts, wheat, and soybeans) are labeled within the ingredient line.

The FDA has issued a proposed rule on gluten-free labeling, allowing food products containing less than 20 ppm of gluten (sourced from wheat, rye, barley, oats or cross-bred hybrids), to be considered gluten-free. [Federal Register: January 23, 2007 (Volume 72, Number 14)]

All U.S. Wrigley chewing gums and confection products have been assessed to be gluten-free with the exception of the products listed below, which contain ingredient(s) derived from wheat or are made on shared equipment that also processes products with wheat and may contain trace amounts of gluten.
Accordingly, these products are labeled as containing wheat-derived ingredients:

• Altoids® Chocolate Dipped Mints (made on equipment that also processes wheat which is stated in the “Allergy Information” line)
• Altoids® Smalls® Peppermint Mints (contains wheat maltodextrin which is stated in the ingredient line)
• Hubba Bubba® Gummi Tape Candy (contains wheat flour and wheat fiber which is stated in the ingredient line)
• Lucas® and Skwinkles® Branded Candy Strips (contains wheat flour and wheat fiber which is stated in the ingredient line)

If your sensitivity extends to other types of gluten or if you are extremely sensitive to gluten sourced from wheat, rye, barley, oats or cross-bred hybrids, then you may want to consult with your physician prior to consuming our products.

We hope this information has been helpful. If you have any additional questions or comments please feel free to contact us at 1-800-WRIGLEY Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CST.


Sincerely,


Sandy Barnes
Consumer Care Representative
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#2 Schatz

 
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Posted 27 October 2011 - 03:17 PM

I read on the Trident site that the gum is gluten-free
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#3 heatherjane

 
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Posted 28 October 2011 - 08:20 AM

Thanks for sharing the info!
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#4 alucard4545

 
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Posted 01 November 2011 - 11:26 AM

I read on the Trident site that the gum is gluten-free


Interesting, I will check that out.
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#5 Cheryl_C

 
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Posted 03 November 2011 - 08:01 AM

Just to add: I found a brand of gum at my local Coles' bookstore that is labelled dairy-free, nut-free, gluten-free, and aspertame-free. (Aspertame-free! So awesome!) It's called "Pur" and has a lone overtop of the u - I don't know how to show that on here, sorry. Anyway it's pretty tasty, and it was nice to lose the aspertame. Check it out!
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#6 alucard4545

 
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Posted 04 November 2011 - 04:02 PM

Just to add: I found a brand of gum at my local Coles' bookstore that is labelled dairy-free, nut-free, gluten-free, and aspertame-free. (Aspertame-free! So awesome!) It's called "Pur" and has a lone overtop of the u - I don't know how to show that on here, sorry. Anyway it's pretty tasty, and it was nice to lose the aspertame. Check it out!


Cool I'll Keep my eye open. Also I just found this gum called Glee Gum, it says gluten free on the back of the package. Awesome! http://www.gleegum.c...Gum_gluten_free
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#7 alucard4545

 
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Posted 06 November 2011 - 07:28 AM

Cool I'll Keep my eye open. Also I just found this gum called Glee Gum, it says gluten free on the back of the package. Awesome! http://www.gleegum.c...Gum_gluten_free


Actually I just noticed one of the ingredients on the Glee Gum is brown rice syrup. usually this is made through a process that includes barley so I'm gonna call them to make sure.
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#8 psawyer

 
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Posted 06 November 2011 - 08:09 AM

Actually I just noticed one of the ingredients on the Glee Gum is brown rice syrup. usually this is made through a process that includes barley so I'm gonna call them to make sure.

Please provide your source for this claim about barley in rice syrup.
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Peter
Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000.
Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986
Markham, Ontario (borders on Toronto)

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#9 alucard4545

 
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Posted 12 November 2011 - 09:20 AM

Please provide your source for this claim about barley in rice syrup.


Here's one source that explains brown rice syrup: http://www.triedtast...-rice-syrup.php

I will contact Glee Gum soon to find out.
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#10 psawyer

 
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Posted 12 November 2011 - 09:30 AM

Here's one source that explains brown rice syrup: http://www.triedtast...-rice-syrup.php

I looked at the linked page. I do not find it credible.


"Brown rice syrup is a natural sweetener produced from fermented cooked rice..."

Okay, so it is "cooked..."

But then, the question "Is it raw?" comes up:

"Yes, pure brown rice syrup is raw" -- I guess somehow it got uncooked?

And yet:

"No, because sometimes commercial brown rice syrup is produced by using GM enzymes." -- They can't tell the difference between raw and GM, clearly.

This obvious error causes me to question the validity of all the information on the site.
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Peter
Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000.
Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986
Markham, Ontario (borders on Toronto)

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

#11 IrishHeart

 
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Posted 12 November 2011 - 12:49 PM

I found this Q and A article in Gluten Free Living Magazine when I was first looking at things like brown rice syrup for use in baking.

Maybe it will help clarify?

"Q. Is brown rice syrup gluten free?

A. Brown rice syrup is a sweetener made by fermenting brown rice with
enzymes to disintegrate the starch content,according to manufacturer AG
Commodities Inc. Then the fermented liquid is strained and cooked until it
becomes syrup. The enzymes are the key to whether the brown rice syrup is gluten free. Barley enzymes, which are often used, make brown rice syrup that is not gluten free. However, if fungal enzymes are used, then the brown rice syrup is gluten free.

Several brands are labeled gluten free, including Lundberg Farms’ Sweet
Dream, Nature’s Flavors’ organic brown rice syrup and Suzanne’s Specialties’ Genmai organic brown rice nectar.

Lundberg Farms purposely switched from a cereal enzyme to a fungal enzyme to make their brown rice syrup gluten free.

You will sometimes see brown rice syrup listed as an ingredient in
processed foods. If it’s used in a product that is labeled gluten free, like Erewhon brown rice cereal or Enjoy Life Foods’ Cocoa Loco snack bars, you can assume it is gluten free.

But if brown rice syrup is used in a mainstream product, it can be harder to tell. Some companies note the use of barley or barley malt in their brown rice syrup, but the allergen labeling law does not require them to. If you see brown rice syrup on a mainstream label, but the source is not listed, the only way to be sure is to check with the food maker."

Since GLEE GUM has labeled the product gluten free, one can assume they have not used barley in the brown rice syrup.
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