Get email alerts Get Celiac.com E-mail Alerts  




Celiac.com Sponsor:
Celiac.com Sponsor:




Ads by Google:






   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

  • Announcements

    • admin

      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Weak And Fatigued
0

7 posts in this topic

Hi all,

Prior to my coeliac diagnosis I ran (usually 10km, up to 25km on weekends) or worked out at the gym almost everyday.

Since going gluten free my diet hasn't changed all that much. The biggest change has been bread - I used to eat 6 pieces a day, now I eat 2 pieces of gluten-free bread every second day.

Since that minor change to my diet, I've struggled through my workouts. I feel so weak and fatigued after 15 minutes or so. It's very frustrating, as I used to run for up to 2.5hrs at a time.

Is it possible that eliminating gluten (even though I never ate a lot of it - mostly just the bread) could cause this?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:

Hi Jenni,

How long have you been gluten-free?

There is an adjustment period and it's different for everyone. Some call it gluten withdrawal. I experienced fatigue and constant hunger for about two or three weeks after going gluten-free. It takes time for our bodies to adjust to the change in diet and it takes time for our bodies to heal.

Have you tried other forms of complex carbs? I eat brown rice pasta. The brand is called Tinkyada (that is my fav), but there are various kinds. I eat rice pasta with lunch on game days. I play competitive ice hockey and soccer.

Good luck! Try to be patient, it takes time :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the reply. I've only been gluten free for 4 days (today is my 5th). I guess I wasnt expecting to get withdrawal symptoms, as I didnt think I ate much gluten beforehand. Maybe there's alot in 6 pieces of bread. I guess I ate little bits in other stuff as well. I must have.

I'll try to be patient..!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Jenni,

Out of curiosity, where are your protein sources coming from? And, how often to you consume protein per day. Let's start there and then I can help you some more.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Gladiator,

Here's an average day:

Breakfast - gluten-free muesli with soy milk OR 2 pieces gluten-free toast with peanut butter and honey

Lunch - Quinoa salad with chickpeas

Dinner - Chicken and veggies/salad (or sometimes fish - I dont eat red meat, just chicken and fish).

Snacks are fruit generally. I have seen a lot of gluten-free snacks, like chip-type things, etc. But have been told to keep it pretty simple to start (diagnosed less than a week ago). I also dont eat nuts, so I'm limited in what I can snack on.

Am I eating enough protein? I dont really know alot about that sort of thing..

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites




I'm really interested in the nutrition and working out too since being diagnosis. Pre-diagnosis I would run out of steam during workouts and after (4months) I think it's a little better. I'm giving it time for my body to heal so I can take in all those needed nutrients. Until then my over all intake is up. Pre workout I eat a chobani yogurt, almonds, a half of a bar for carbs and little caffeine. Sounds like you may be avoiding nuts and dairy so this may not be helpful for you. Good luck! Note, that I am not a doctor nor do I play one on tv. I'm just giving you my personal experience. I'm also open to any suggestions from anyone too. Cheers.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Gladiator,

Here's an average day:

Breakfast - gluten-free muesli with soy milk OR 2 pieces gluten-free toast with peanut butter and honey

Lunch - Quinoa salad with chickpeas

Dinner - Chicken and veggies/salad (or sometimes fish - I dont eat red meat, just chicken and fish).

Snacks are fruit generally. I have seen a lot of gluten-free snacks, like chip-type things, etc. But have been told to keep it pretty simple to start (diagnosed less than a week ago). I also dont eat nuts, so I'm limited in what I can snack on.

Am I eating enough protein? I dont really know alot about that sort of thing..

With the exception of your honey at breakfast, I'm not seeing any forms of all natural sugars. If you snack just a few times on the following it will elevate your blood sugar throughout the day and you won't have those "lows" and doldrums:

- Apple with almond butter

- Mango chunks (buy them frozen and let thaw)

- Smoothies with berries (strawberry, blackberry, blueberries)

- Dried fruits

- Pears

Give that a try with your small snacks (in between meals). Remember, you want to stabilize your blood sugar throughout the day... it will keep you from feeling fatigued.

The Gluten Gladiator

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0