Get email alerts Get Celiac.com E-mail Alerts  




Celiac.com Sponsor:
Celiac.com Sponsor:




Ads by Google:






   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

Karma Is A .....
0

15 posts in this topic

Dh has had the big d since yesterday. He said he's exhausted and he can't keep his eyes open most of the time. He has canker sores. His tremmer is awful. (he's had d for a while, just really bad since yesterday). He said he has major brain fog. When I tell him to go gluten free for 2 weeks to see if it gets better he tells me to leave him alone, and that it's not that.

It's 8:21 and hrs in bed. All the years I was in bed this early and he complained that I was "ignoring" him. Sounds like pay back?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:

My observation is that you seem very angry about him, and that you hope he has celiac disease.

I wouldn't wish it on my worst enemy, even though it's just an inconvenience that can be coped with. :D

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's quite possible that your husband DOES have celiac disease. It's not uncommon for celiacs to be attracted to other celiacs (I say this because I've observed couples at celiac conferences who found out after they were married that they each had celiac). Dr. Peter Green presented an Italian study at a Gluten Intolerance Group conference a few years ago in Seattle that demonstrated that the faces of celiacs can look quite different from those of "normal" people. It has something to do with a hormone that is supposed to kick in late in the teens, but we have trouble absorbing it, so some of our bones continue to grow. Here in the States, I began observing that many celiacs at conferences actually have very similar features (prominent cheek bones, long faces, prominent chins that curve forward, and sometimes a square jaw). Actually, most celiacs are handsome/pretty, because these features are considered quite attractive, and I believe that a number of famous actors and actresses actually have celiac. I pointed this phenomenon out to a number of the attendees at various conferences, and they were astounded to observe the same similarities.

Since studies have also shown that people tend to be attracted to people of the opposite sex who mirror their own faces, it would make perfect sense for celiacs to be attracted to celiacs. Therefore, it's not a stretch to believe that your husband is afflicted with the same malady as you....but good luck convincing him! Some people remain in denial for many years before they accept their gluten-free status. However, when he gets sick enough, he may be willing to at least try the two-week trial period. Good luck!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's 8:21 and hrs in bed. All the years I was in bed this early and he complained that I was "ignoring" him. Sounds like pay back?

Being truly cruel would be believing that someone was suffering and choosing to taunt them anyway.

Being truly ignorant (or in denial) means they really don't believe, and therefore they don't understand. It sounds like your husband is the latter.

I know it doesn't make it much easier to bear seemingly cruel comments from him for all those years, but it would be a shame for you to endure even worse Karma because you yourself were truly cruel.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's quite possible that your husband DOES have celiac disease. It's not uncommon for celiacs to be attracted to other celiacs (I say this because I've observed couples at celiac conferences who found out after they were married that they each had celiac). Dr. Peter Green presented an Italian study at a Gluten Intolerance Group conference a few years ago in Seattle that demonstrated that the faces of celiacs can look quite different from those of "normal" people. It has something to do with a hormone that is supposed to kick in late in the teens, but we have trouble absorbing it, so some of our bones continue to grow. Here in the States, I began observing that many celiacs at conferences actually have very similar features (prominent cheek bones, long faces, prominent chins that curve forward, and sometimes a square jaw). Actually, most celiacs are handsome/pretty, because these features are considered quite attractive, and I believe that a number of famous actors and actresses actually have celiac. I pointed this phenomenon out to a number of the attendees at the Seattle conference, and they were astounded to observe the same similarities.

Since studies have also shown that people tend to be attracted to people of the opposite sex who mirror their own faces, it would make perfect sense for celiacs to be attracted to celiacs. Therefore, it's not a stretch to believe that your husband is afflicted with the same malady as you....but good luck convincing him! Some people remain in denial for many years before they accept their gluten-free status. However, when he gets sick enough, you may be willing to at least try the two-week trial period. Good luck!

This was fascinating! Thanks for the info.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites




Dh has had the big d since yesterday. He said he's exhausted and he can't keep his eyes open most of the time. He has canker sores. His tremmer is awful. (he's had d for a while, just really bad since yesterday). He said he has major brain fog. When I tell him to go gluten free for 2 weeks to see if it gets better he tells me to leave him alone, and that it's not that.

It's 8:21 and hrs in bed. All the years I was in bed this early and he complained that I was "ignoring" him. Sounds like pay back?

Is he dyhrdated? When people lose too much fluid they become dehydrated and dehydration is very serious. Tremor and exhaustion are signs of dehydration as is confusion. I would be more concerned with keeping your husband hydrated than gloating over his misfourtune of being ill. There are many many different reasons he could be sick most of which are not celiac. Things like food poisoning and viruses. Sometimes when the the answer to your problem was a zebra you start to see zebras everywhere even when it's really just a horse.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know I sound like a mean bi$&@ but when you are doughted, made fun of, jokes cracked at you, and all you do is fight about what I eat, yes I become a little bitter.

Food is an issue for me. I'm obsessed before I had this issue. Now it's magnified.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know I sound like a mean bi$&@ but when you are doughted, made fun of, jokes cracked at you, and all you do is fight about what I eat, yes I become a little bitter.

Food is an issue for me. I'm obsessed before I had this issue. Now it's magnified.

I know its not the most mature or productive thing but - I would probably be glad he was experiecning it, too. :ph34r:

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know I sound like a mean bi$&@ but when you are doughted, made fun of, jokes cracked at you, and all you do is fight about what I eat, yes I become a little bitter.

Food is an issue for me. I'm obsessed before I had this issue. Now it's magnified.

I understand where you're coming from. You're so frustrated with him and his treatment of you. It would be nice if he would learn something from this experience, but if you are snarky to him he won't learn anything. It will just keep the negativity in your marriage going. Somebody has to step up and be positive and affect a positive change between you. Maybe you can somehow use this to find a way to open up the lines of communication between the two of you. You both have to be willing to budge. If your marriage keeps going like this, I am concerned for your total well being. Health isn't just about our bodies. It's about our emotions, our spiritual life and our minds. You can decide to change the toxic atmosphere between you two and maybe he will follow suit. Your kids need to have a better example than what's been happening.

Would he agree to go to counseling? It can work wonders when you're in a hard time.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm really bitter right now. So today I do wish that every doubting doctor (you know the ones, their quotes "you're too young to have celiac. what? did you read something on the internet? You want me to test you for that "fad" disease. Maybe gluten isn't your problem. It's all in your head. Are you anorexic? Maybe you should go eat a Twinkie. It's IBS." would have a week of Celiac. Or maybe have it for the average time it takes to get diagnosed.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We are working on this. For my birthday he went to the store and put a huge basket together full of gluten-free convience foods (cracker, pasta,cookies, brownies, candles, and a really nice bottle of wine). I was touched he thought about it.

I'm still bitter. It's still a sore subject between us. We start counseling Monday :-)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We are working on this. For my birthday he went to the store and put a huge basket together full of gluten-free convience foods (cracker, pasta,cookies, brownies, candles, and a really nice bottle of wine). I was touched he thought about it.

I'm still bitter. It's still a sore subject between us. We start counseling Monday :-)

Happy Birthday, that sounds like a really sweet thing for him to do.

I noticed you have a three year old that is gluten free. It is always advised that all 1st degree relatives of someone with celiac be tested. If it possible to convince him to do so he really should be tested himself. After I was finally diagnosed and recovered my kids got tested. Even though I am a blood test negative celiac both of them were positive. That prompted my ex to test and he was positive also. Celiac can have effects on our brain that make us more irritable or depressed. It made a big difference in the tension level at home when everyone was gluten free.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is a big update...... We are almost done with our divorce..... He told me the "gluten drama" was the end. He found someone else, cheated on me, got caught, I kicked him out and filed for divorce.

The new guy, it looks to me like he has some gluten issues. I went back to gluten in hopes to save my marraige. I know how great I feel without it.... But as a single mom of 3 in trying to figure out how to get back to it. My new man wants to go gluten free with me

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, at least you don't have to put up with him anymore :) People can be so ignorent about their health sometimes.

Good luck :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gluten drama? What a loser. Yeah it must have really sucked for him that food made you suck. Sorry...But I AM vengeful, and there are actually quite a few people I would wish celiac on. Hope your new relationship works out. Just please stick to your guns. If you know something makes you feel bad, DON'T EAT IT!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      104,354
    • Total Posts
      920,511
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Welcome!   You were smart to think about cross contamination.  Although it is great that there are so many gluten-free options out there, in the beginning it is best to try a whole foods diet, until your son feels a bit better.  The learning curve for the gluten-free diet is steep.  It is better for you to get everything down before letting others feed him.   When I was diagnosed, my hubby had been gluten free for 12 years.  I thought I knew the drill and converted right over to those gluten-free goodies I baked him.  Turned out, like many of us, I had some food inolerances not related to gluten but as a result of gut damage.  So, additives like Xantham gum made me think I was getting glutened, but I was not.  So, again, try to stick to naturally gluten free foods that are less processed for a while.  When you do venture out, I use "find me gluten free" and read the reviews from celiacs (not a person who thinks gluten-free is a way to lose weight! )   Here are some great tips from out Newbie 101 thread:  
    • I have the same problem. Was told it was psoriasis but no treatments worked even injections. I was daignosed celiac in may, and noticed a year ago the palm of my hand would itch intensely then get small blisters. I believe they are both dh. Have been gluten-free since diagnosis but still have issues with both areas. Thankful digestive issues cleared but would love to know how long before they clear up? I hope we both get feed back and best wishes to you!
    • Yes it most certainly could be a false negative, and I would bet you a dozen donuts that it is (gluten free, of course.   )  At the very least you can be sure it is related to gluten.  These gluten rashes take forever to clear up.  I don't know about you, but whenever I start to doubt my gluten intolerance, I just look at my skin, and the old blood stains on my sheets, and I am reassured that it's not all in my head, and I need to avoid gluten as if it were a bucket of battery acid.
    • Hello, My fiance and I are going to Singapore for our honeymoon next year and I was wondering if anyone knew any cafes/restaurants etc that have gluten-free dishes? We previously went two years ago and enjoyed ourselves so much that we definitely wanted to go back our our honeymoon. Catch is I got diagnosed as being gluten intolerant a few months ago, negative for Coeliac though. If I eat gluten I have bad nausea, bloating, diarrhea etc. Not pretty for a honeymoon :-) I am more than happy to eat fruit at breakfast and make do with steamed rice at dinner etc but if anyone has any ideas on anywhere I can safely eat that would be much appreciated. I don't care how much it costs! Also is it possible for me to bring packaged gluten-free food into Singapore from Australia? I am not sure on the rules. Thank you!!
    • Went in and talked to the manager of our pm and asked about the gluten free pizza, and he told me he can't guarantee its 100% gluten free because of the flour in the air from the other crusts being made.  I value the honesty.   The other employee also mentioned changing gloves.   I was thinking wow great, until I walked out and got to thinking about cross contamination from everyone grabbing the toppings out of the same bins and spreading the sauce with the same utensils.    My son was just diagnosed this week so we are new to the whole lifestyle.   So any help or info is greatly appreciated.    Thanks  
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Entries

  • Recent Status Updates

  • Who's Online (See full list)

  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      61,423
    • Most Online
      1,763

    Newest Member
    Kimmieellis
    Joined