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Fruit And Vegetables


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#31 T.H.

 
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Posted 13 November 2011 - 07:29 PM

Oh goodness. I guess I'll just say that I'm glad some of what I've had to say has been able to help some people. ^_^

Shauna, have you ever considered that you might have chemical sensitivities?



It is something we looked at, but doesn't seem to be the case. Organic produce, with less chemicals, actually tends to cause more gluten issues than conventional produce, at least with the bigger farms. Lots of organic farms seem to use sprays and such that have less processed grains and grain derivatives in them, I'm assuming as a binder.

Has someone found a good cleaning solution or method?


There were a couple things we used to do that we eventually had to abandon when we grew more sensitive. But they did help.

One thing for beans and whole grains is to sort and wash. Pour them out on a dark surface, like a black cookie pan, and take out any suspicious looking grains that don't look the same as the grain/legume you are sorting. Then wash them with soap and water in a mesh sieve (metal coffee filter, for teff).

Fill up a bowl with soapy water, put the beans/grains in the sieve and put it in the water, then scrub it around in against the inside of the sieve for about 20-30 seconds. Dump out the soapy water, rinse out the bowl, and repeat the soap washing 1-2 more times. Then rinse that way 2-3 times to get all the soap off.

With beans I have reacted to, I have washed the same batch that was originally tested and then re-tested it later. The reaction was less after washing in this manner. So I do think that it may be of some use in lowering any potential low level gluten, especially in items that it might be difficult to clean. Usually, if I am not using it right away, I needed to dry these out before storing, either in the open air or the oven on warm.

It's only useful for items that are sturdy enough to scrub against the sieve, though.

For softer, smooth skinned produce, washing with soap and water, then peeling, then washing with soap and water again, helped a bit.

For some, I wasn't ever able to find a solution that made any difference, like the strawberries you mentioned, Kareng. Broccoli, peaches, and cauliflower have been in that category, as well. Probably someone more skilled with a knife might be able to peel the peach, but I always ended up with a big, mushy mess instead, LOL.
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T.H.

Gluten free since August 10, 2009.
21 years with undiagnosed Celiac Disease

23 years with undiagnosed sulfite sensitivity

25 years with undiagnosed mast cell activation disorder (MCAD) 

 

Daughter: celiac and MCAD positive

Son: gluten intolerant
Father, brother: celiac positive


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#32 Mango04

 
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Posted 13 November 2011 - 08:53 PM

It is something we looked at, but doesn't seem to be the case. Organic produce, with less chemicals, actually tends to cause more gluten issues than conventional produce, at least with the bigger farms. Lots of organic farms seem to use sprays and such that have less processed grains and grain derivatives in them, I'm assuming as a binder.


This comment really reminds me of hypersensitive people who used to post around here a few years ago. They found out their hypersensitivity was the result of other underlying issues (I think lyme disease was one issue - I can't remember the others). Your comment is so similar to the ones I used to read here from them I just felt the need to point that out. (The main thread they posted on is now gone though, I think).

Sorry for the off-topic post.. :ph34r:
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"Let food be thy medicine, and let thy medicine be food." - Hippocrates

#33 psawyer

 
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Posted 13 November 2011 - 09:03 PM

This comment really reminds me of hypersensitive people who used to post around here a few years ago. They found out their hypersensitivity was the result of other underlying issues (I think lyme disease was one issue - I can't remember the others). Your comment is so similar to the ones I used to read here from them I just felt the need to point that out. (The main thread they posted on is now gone though, I think).

Sorry for the off-topic post.. :ph34r:

Actually, it is not off-topic. Lyme could well explain why some of these members are sill sick even after adopting the gluten-free diet.

The Lyme Disease topic is here. It has been quiet for a while, but is not gone.
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Peter
Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000.
Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986
Markham, Ontario (borders on Toronto)

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#34 dilettantesteph

 
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Posted 14 November 2011 - 05:55 AM

So........
Back to the original posters question. Is there something that can be done to wash fruits and vegs - more than just rinsing with water and less than growing your own or quizzing farmers (an exhausting prospect for anyone). At least I think that's the original idea.

I have done triple washing with soap followed by careful rinsing. That helps.
I got an ultrasonic food washer which I used with soap (by hand washing dish soap). That helped more.
I tried washing with rubbing alcohol, followed by washing with soap and careful rinsing. I don't know if that helped further or not.

Bottom line was that careful sourcing was more effective. I still wash with soap and water and scrubbing with a vegetable brush if possible.
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#35 kareng

 
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Posted 14 November 2011 - 06:00 AM

I have done triple washing with soap followed by careful rinsing. That helps.
I got an ultrasonic food washer which I used with soap (by hand washing dish soap). That helped more.
I tried washing with rubbing alcohol, followed by washing with soap and careful rinsing. I don't know if that helped further or not.

Bottom line was that careful sourcing was more effective. I still wash with soap and water and scrubbing with a vegetable brush if possible.


What's an ultrasonic food washer? Sounds a bit high tech for Walmart!
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Once again, we come to the Holiday Season, a deeply religious time that each of us observes, in his own way, by going to the mall of his choice. - Dave Barry
 
“The main reason Santa is so jolly is because he knows where all the bad girls live.”  - George Carlin
 
“One can never have enough socks," said Dumbledore. "Another Christmas has come and gone and I didn't get a single pair. People will insist on giving me books.”  - J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and The Sorcerer's Stone
 
 
 
 
 

 


#36 dilettantesteph

 
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Posted 14 November 2011 - 06:00 AM

This comment really reminds me of hypersensitive people who used to post around here a few years ago. They found out their hypersensitivity was the result of other underlying issues (I think lyme disease was one issue - I can't remember the others). Your comment is so similar to the ones I used to read here from them I just felt the need to point that out. (The main thread they posted on is now gone though, I think).

Sorry for the off-topic post.. :ph34r:

I do believe that it is important to consider other possibilities with your doctor if you are still sick on the standard gluten free diet. Super sensitivity is only one possibility.

In my case, my doctors and I have considered all sorts of possibilities, but this super sensitivity stuff has been the only answer. As long as we stick to these techniques, my family members and I are in very good health. As I have bragged about before, I even did a mini triathlon!! I am now back at work after 17 years off. These super sensitive techniques have been the answer for me.
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#37 dilettantesteph

 
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Posted 14 November 2011 - 06:04 AM

What's an ultrasonic food washer? Sounds a bit high tech for Walmart!

I got it from a company who I can't mention here. Here's a link to another (much more expensive) source: http://healthequip-s...et/ulfowa.html.
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#38 weluvgators

 
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Posted 14 November 2011 - 08:43 AM

We often use an ultrasonic food washer - that is amazing stuff, not even from a gluten perspective - it truly opened my eyes to how thickly coated some of our produce was!

We also use a soap and water with scrub brush method. We generally follow a three wash process - first with soap and water, the next two with water only. Our washing processes depend on our past experiences and the particular food being washed. Peeling is another defense we use as well.

For grains and beans, we do an initial visual inspection, followed by an extensive wash procedure in the ultrasonic food washer. We also rely extensively on gluten home testing to ensure that our sources meet our gluten free requirements.

So again, we have found that sourcing of our food is the most critical step for maintaining our wellness. We have been able to demonstrate with gluten home testing that our wash procedure works *sometimes*. We were able to take a dried fruit that was positive for gluten (not a high positive) to negative for gluten with our ultrasonic food washer. We were unable to clean a gluten contaminated amaranth to test negative for gluten . . . and we tried and tried and tried. I have had the same experience with other contaminated grains, as we were unable to sufficiently clean them from positive for gluten to negative for gluten.

Now is a great time of year to connect with farmers and CSA owners to discuss your produce needs, as they are already planning for next year's crops. We found that reaching out to a local CSA group helped us tremendously, as she was doing a lot of legwork in finding all of the local farms and interviewing them on their practices. She can quickly tell me the risk of any produce that she carries. She also grew a few of the crops herself this year and was able to meet our specifications.

Another fun produce adventure that we had this year was meeting up with another super sensitive friend in the next state over and going to her local farmer's market with her! She had already done all of the interviewing and could quickly steer me to the foods that met our requirements. It was so much fun!

As for considering other things . . . yeah, we do it all the time. But again, I spent over a year watching my child suffer in horrible ways, always in a desperate search for a *something else* (in large part because I listened to people that repeatedly told me that there *must* be something else) . . . well two hospitalizations, dozens of doctors, a trip cross country to seek more specialist healthcare provider input, and dozens if not hundreds of tests now have been unable to identify *something else* that relieves our super sensitivity. Incorporating our experiences and the expertise of other super sensitives COMPLETELY RELIEVES the chronic symptoms that otherwise surface. The list of *other* things that we have tested for borders on ridiculous . . . and OUCH - those bills have been extraordinary. And the hospitalizations, dozens of doctors (many reknown for their specialties) and experiences of our family haven't come up with anything more than continuing to follow super sensitive protocols . . . because that works (and it is enormously CHEAPER!!!)
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My super silly red siren is my guiding light. She has been a tremendous lesson for me in how gluten affects different people in very different ways. She is a super duper silly girl that was simply born that way. I have no idea why I am so blessed to have her guidance.

#39 kareng

 
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Posted 14 November 2011 - 08:59 AM

We often use an ultrasonic food washer - that is amazing stuff, not even from a gluten perspective - it truly opened my eyes to how thickly coated some of our produce was!




I was wondering about these washers from the non-gluten perspective. My kids like to eat apples and I prefer to leave the peel for the fiber. Trying to get the coating off some apples, even organic, is hard. Also, we had the cantelope listeria problem (not at my house). Apparently, its very hard to get germs off a cantelope because of all the little divots. M & I LOVE cantelope! They grow well here, so I think we may try some next year.
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Once again, we come to the Holiday Season, a deeply religious time that each of us observes, in his own way, by going to the mall of his choice. - Dave Barry
 
“The main reason Santa is so jolly is because he knows where all the bad girls live.”  - George Carlin
 
“One can never have enough socks," said Dumbledore. "Another Christmas has come and gone and I didn't get a single pair. People will insist on giving me books.”  - J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and The Sorcerer's Stone
 
 
 
 
 

 


#40 BakingQueen

 
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Posted 14 November 2011 - 09:19 AM

How do you guys wash things with coatings (apples), and things like broccoli? Also, do you recommend buys veggies that are packaged bags like spinach and celery or the ones that are just in bunches open air when you are forced to buy from a supermarket, and what about organic vs. non-organic?
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#41 Gemini

 
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Posted 14 November 2011 - 02:33 PM

Weluvgators, I recognize that you and a few others are super-sensitive to gluten. We have set up this area on the board for your benefit.

I stand by my statement that Shauna (T.H.) reports a level of sensitivity that is far beyond anything we have seen in the time I have been here. Worrying about the diet of animals whose manure was used as fertilizer to grow crops is unique. Your view may differ, but for the vast majority of us here, it does not matter where the manure came from. It is all just fertilizer.


Peter...I admire you for your diplomatic attitude! I never like to disparage anyone with food allergies and intolerances as I am pretty darn sensitive
to gluten myself but worrying about what the animals are eating if their manure is used as fertilizer borders on the neurotic. There is just no valid medical science behind this line of thought. I realize it is very easy to become neurotic when first diagnosed.....I think we have all had our moments when learning the diet but this is getting old.

Just wanted to add I hope everyone has a wonderful Holiday season, no matter how you celebrate because I am sure I will be booted from the forum for using the word neurotic! <_<
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#42 Lisa

 
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Posted 14 November 2011 - 03:33 PM



Just wanted to add I hope everyone has a wonderful Holiday season, no matter how you celebrate <_<



And a happy holiday season to you too! :) The speed of it's approach is concerning me! :blink:
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Lisa

Gluten Free - August 15, 2004

"Not all who wander are lost" - JRR Tolkien

#43 Cypressmyst

 
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Posted 14 November 2011 - 04:49 PM

There is just no valid medical science behind this line of thought.


My Dearest Gemini I do beg to differ on this point.

Soy Protein in Chicken Eggs

The above is a link to a study on the Soy Protein being found in the egg yolks of chickens fed a soy based diet. If the Soy Protein can get there then it isn't that big of a stretch to think that the Gluten Protein could get there and I can tell you from personal experience with my own chickens that there is something to this. I feed them a grain/soy free diet and can eat as many of their eggs as I want without getting brain fogged or a stomach ache. I have a limit of 3 store bought (organic free range/cage free) eggs every few days otherwise.

So if chickens are what they eat, and humans are what we eat, then why is it such a stretch to think that plants are what they eat? And if what they are eating is the gluten protein then...

I also had a first hand experience with something similar in my tomato garden this year. I spread jalapeno juice at the base of the plants to keep the bunnies away. It worked wonderfully but to my surprise my cherry tomatoes had a spicey taste to them, at least the first few handfuls that I harvested. It was interesting and quite tasty. :D

Let's make sure that we are keeping all of this science and logic based and not just in the realm of wishful thinking. B) Doing so does a disservice to the people of this forum and is a good way to keep people unnecessarily sick.

Of course it is possible that the internet and my tastebuds are "all in my head." :lol:
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#44 Lisa

 
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Posted 14 November 2011 - 05:13 PM

Got any studies on gluten transfer? I would really like to be aware, if that should be the case. Honestly.

And I can't agree more to keep this scientifically based even though some people may think I'm a Flat Earther. ;)

I'm really not. :)
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Lisa

Gluten Free - August 15, 2004

"Not all who wander are lost" - JRR Tolkien

#45 Lisa

 
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Posted 14 November 2011 - 06:10 PM

Yes, please....But this topic should be about cleaning fruits and vegetables. Don't scrub those strawberries too much. :huh:

Begin a new topic if it is not keeping with the current one.
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Lisa

Gluten Free - August 15, 2004

"Not all who wander are lost" - JRR Tolkien




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