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Ah!

Thank you for this thread!

Very interesting and...

I'm half Scots/Irish!

Is that how you say it?

or Scottish/Irish?

or is it Scotch/Irish???

:unsure::rolleyes:

I've never known one darn thing about the Scottish way of life...and often wonder.

The other half is

German, German, and German!

I think we must have been directly related to Hitler or something because my mother told stories of not being able to understand her grandparents because they had not been able to learn English well enough to communicate regularly that way, but they punished their kids severely for speaking German...even at home! They were ashamed to be German and wanted their children to be successful so they were required to only speak English. Consequently they didn't teach their children to speak German either. So my mother only knew a few words and didn't really know her grandparents all that well.

Sorta sad.

I'm kidding about being related to Hitler.

But it very likely could have been that they didn't want the association with Hitler

And there is another bit...one of my grandparents was High German and the other was Low German...and that caused a bit of scandal in the family...on the German side of course. I have no idea what it means other than...Somebody was from the wrong side of the tracks.

:)

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We lived in Bavaria during our time in Germany, and the daily greeting was Gruss Gott! When we got to northern Germany we found out that was definitely "low" German :P

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I am from Australia my dad was Welsh/Irish (who emigrated here in the 60s) and my mum is Irish/Australian. I lived in Ireland for almost 4 years and Newfoundland for one and now I live in the central west of NSW. I have traveled to 18 countries -all before I was gluten-free - I dread to think of what it would be like in some of those place gluten-free. But I dread the thought of long haul flights with 4 kids so I'm not going anywhere for awhile :lol:

I play traditional irish music, as does my husband, as did my dad and my grandad. Kind of family tradition I suppose.

We have lots of wildlife around here. Kangaroos and amazing parrots, lizards, goannas and snakes (not my favourite!) possumes etc, we go swimming in the river and explore all the gold rush towns of the area - lots of bushranger history here too. Love it.

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Could be why Australia has a high rate of celiac too??---as you suggest, you had an influx of immigrants throughout your rich history. BTW, I have always dreamed of visiting Australia! We keep returning to Ireland as we both love our grandparents' homeland (we've gone there 4 times) and it's time to venture elsewhere in the world.

Also, some have joked this is not Celiac Disease but "Celtic Disease" as this population seems to be impacted so deeply.

I absolutely agree with you, 3/4 of Australians claim Irish heritage.

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I am from Oregon in the states but have been in Canada for 40 years.

My maternal grandfather was Russian (Ukraine)and arrived in the U>S> at the end of the 1800's, early 1900's and my grandmother was German.

My son has been teaching himself Russian for a while now and he has a fascination with Russian prison tattoos, not getting them, studying about them.

My paternal side goes all the way back to 1702 Wales. One story is that a family member at that time was a highwayman.

Most of my relatives from my fathers side live in Tennessee area. I have never been there but we were raised on greens with vinegar and fried white cornbread, black eyed peas and Sassafras tea. :)

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I am Canadian but maybe the only one originally from Africa here and wondering why me why gluten intolerance chose me? When you're originally African with this disease, your genes have truly betrayed you. Or am I guilty of years of French bread eating? When you're from Africa, there is always someone to tell you "put your trust in God and eat you will be fine". Ok but God doesn't expect me to sleep at the middle of the street where I could be hit by a car :) . Same here. Doctors think you can't have celiac because you aren't looking very N-W European.

Anyway, my sister who lives in Africa was shocked the first time I told her about my intolerance. Now, she keeps meeting new celiac regularly. She was telling about someone she knows who grinds her own rice. It is tough for children as there aren't many desserts and sweet food without gluten over there. Maybe I should be doing something just to help the poor kids with celiac in a country where nobody understand them. Often, it is the cases of malnutrition that are known to the doctors or first discovered. We eat alot of bread back home but unfortunately, the bread is less and less made from the native sorghum and more and more of wheat. Growing up, I remember my mom was anti-wheat she wasn't impressed by the wonders of gluten and how it made the flat bread chewy. Btw, sorghum is one of the healthiest grain. It contains vit B17 which has anti cancerous properties. Long time ago, colon cancer was unknown to Africans but not anymore!

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I'm American.

My mother's side is Swedish, German, Scottish, and English.

My dad's is Irish, Scottish, German, and English.

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Born in America (Yonkers, NY). My Mom's grand-parents were from Ireland and my Dad's parents are off the boat from Italy. But somewhere in there a dog was added to the gene pool...I think I am part dog too.

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Ah!

Thank you for this thread!

Very interesting and...

I'm half Scots/Irish!

Is that how you say it?

or Scottish/Irish?

or is it Scotch/Irish???

:unsure::rolleyes:

I've never known one darn thing about the Scottish way of life...and often wonder.

The other half is

German, German, and German!

I think we must have been directly related to Hitler or something because my mother told stories of not being able to understand her grandparents because they had not been able to learn English well enough to communicate regularly that way, but they punished their kids severely for speaking German...even at home! They were ashamed to be German and wanted their children to be successful so they were required to only speak English. Consequently they didn't teach their children to speak German either. So my mother only knew a few words and didn't really know her grandparents all that well.

Sorta sad.

I'm kidding about being related to Hitler.

But it very likely could have been that they didn't want the association with Hitler

And there is another bit...one of my grandparents was High German and the other was Low German...and that caused a bit of scandal in the family...on the German side of course. I have no idea what it means other than...Somebody was from the wrong side of the tracks.

:)

Hi. In terms of the correct way to describe your Scottish heritage , you're half Scottish. Scotch is a desription of items such as Scotch whisky(Mmmm) but not a person.Hope that clears it up.

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I'm Italian born and bred, temporarily a US resident for higher education reasons :) my heritage cooking may actually be what makes it easy to be gluten-free because we rely more on veggies than grains, at least compared to the US, which, come to think of it, is kind of weird, as I always assumed we were very much grain-fed beasts.

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I'm German, German, and some more German on both sides of my family. Even though I live in the US, I'm an immigrant. My son is the first from my stem of the family, who is born on US soil. My aunt has a couple of kids over here, but that's HER stem of the family. Everything before that is true German. Although I do believe that there must be some Viking in there somewhere, because I'm pretty much a nomad and LOVE to travel. I've seen a countries on all continents except of New Zealand and Asia and Africa only the northern part. :)

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The viking culture has always fascinated me greatly, and because of my ancestry I have taken time to study it. The vikings were also Germanic, so you very well could be! They were tribal, but the amount of land that they held is just positively mind blowing. If you ever have some spare time, spend some time getting some books at your local library. Also, any history from the Eddas is just so fascinating, it truly has given me an appreciation for their culture and I am so grateful for what was able to be preserved on paper before their oral history was completely lost.

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I know that my dads grandparents came from Germany and settled in central Illinois and my moms grandparents came from Scotland. I see a theme in most of the posts. Almost everyone has German or Scottish heritage.We have lived in Illinois so long that we really don't have any customs left from either country. :( it kind of makes me sad. 

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So far I have found out that my family is German, English, Irish, and Native American. My family moved to Michigan about three generations ago. 

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