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#16 AVR1962

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Posted 19 November 2011 - 01:20 AM

I find this topic particularly fascinating :) as the majority of us DXed with celiac are of European descent: Irish, Scottish, German, Swedish, English, Italian, Polish. The HLA DQ2 genes are prevalent in these cultures, including some in Africa. Pretty cool stuff, huh?

Could be why Australia has a high rate of celiac too??---as you suggest, you had an influx of immigrants throughout your rich history. BTW, I have always dreamed of visiting Australia! We keep returning to Ireland as we both love our grandparents' homeland (we've gone there 4 times) and it's time to venture elsewhere in the world.

Also, some have joked this is not Celiac Disease but "Celtic Disease" as this population seems to be impacted so deeply.

The recent research cites these cultures I listed as being the ones with the highest rate of celiac and the last cultures to adopt wheat as a staple grain. Seems somewhat ironic that Italians should be hit so deeply. My cousin's wife (also a celiac) who is Italian does not find this amusing at all. :rolleyes: But it also explains why the Italians have been so persistent in researching celiac and testing toddlers before they trigger the disease, thereby possibly preventing further autoimmune disease. If only the US could get on board with this concept. We cannot even DX it properly! <_<

I also find it intriguing that I got a DQ2 gene from both my Mom and my Dad --his parents emigrated from Armenia ---and that culture has its roots in the Middle East where bulgar wheat is used in almost everything. Makes one wonder if it isn't the genetically modified WHEAT of today that is the problem as well as having a genetic predisposition?? I know Dr. Fasano has suggested this and is conducting research as we speak.

Sorry, didn't mean to get sidetracked. :lol: Just find genetics and genealogy very interesting and fun to explore! :)

Thanks for thinking of this thread--it's fun to see everyone's "roots". :)

oh, almost forgot to add: I am an American of Armenian, Irish, German and French-Canadian descent. First or second generation.

Off subject here, but where in Ireland do you like to visit? We are a bit particial to the Dingle Pennisula ourselves.
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#17 mushroom

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Posted 19 November 2011 - 01:41 AM

OK - roots firmly in New Zealand (third generation), but I divide my time between US and NZ currently (acquired US citizenship through US hub and was long-term resident of CA).

Dad's ancestry English and Scottish, via northern Ireland before heading to NZ. (on First Four Ships - like the Mayflower :lol: in 1850) Mom Welsh through and through. Both families sheep farmers, I grew up on farms.

Hub (also celiac) English and Welsh on his mom's side, English (from the Mayflower :lol: ) and Scottish on his dad's side, with a bit of Native American thrown in somewhere because his hair is square instead of round and he has a native American blood type (B -)

So, two more for Celtic disease :D
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#18 Juliebove

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Posted 19 November 2011 - 03:23 AM

I'm American. Although we haven't been able to trace our family tree back on one side very far, we do know there is English, French, Irish, and Cherokee Indian.

I come from a pretty much non-traditional family. So much so that I sometimes go out of my way to try to be different.

The only real tradition that we have every year is leaving one Christmas decoration up. This is never intentional. It just sort of happens.

It started one year when I made wreaths for a Christmas auction at work. I got some cheap straw wreaths, covered them in white glue, then coated them with potpourri, let dry and decorated with ribbons and silk flowers. I had one wreath left so I decorated it with some leftover red ribbon that I had and then put it in my window, facing the street. At the time I lived above a dance studio on a very busy street.

It just so happened that the wreath was put in the window around Christmas time. I wasn't even thinking of Christmas when I did it. But then Christmas came and went and the wreath was still there.

A coworker began to complain. "You need to take down that Christmas wreath! It's after Christmas!" I found her complaint to be so silly that just to annoy her I left it up until the following year. By then it was looking ratty and I threw it out.

But since then every year there has been something we have forgotten to take down. Last year it was a nativity wall hanging. I think it is quite ugly but my daughter found it and wanted it. So I bought it for her. It's still up.

We're not going to be able to put up our big tree this year. Pity because it is so pretty. Last year we got a pastel pink one with hot pink lights. Daughter collects cat and ballerina ornaments. So it looked really nice.

We recently got two cats. A mom and daughter. Mom's name is Jazzy and the daughter is named Ballerina. Ballerina just turned one and she is climbing on everything and getting into everything. No doubt she would destroy the tree!

We just bought a little tree complete with decorations that we will try to put up. If the cat messes with it, it will be no big deal to take down. Now we won't have to lug the big tree and all the decorations into the house. We can just bring in the stockings.
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#19 IrishHeart

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Posted 19 November 2011 - 07:26 AM

My hubs side (he doesn't have Celiac) but you can trace the mental illness in the female descendants from one famous one during Civil War times. It doesn't seem to affect the males. Just a wierd genetic tidbit for you all.



Mrs. Lincoln, perhaps....??
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"Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is. The way we cope with it makes the difference." Virginia Satir

"The strongest of all warriors are these two - time and patience." Leo Tolstoy

"If you want to lift yourself up, lift up someone else" Booker T. Washington

“If idiots could fly, the sky would be like an airport.”― Laura Davenport 

"Do or do not. There is no try. "-  Yoda.

"LTES"  Gem 2014

 

Misdiagnosed for 25+ years; Finally Diagnosed with Celiac  11/01/10.  Double DQ2 genes. This thing tried to kill me. I view Celiac as a fire breathing dragon --and I have run my sword right through his throat.
I. Win. bliss-smiley-emoticon.gif


#20 ElseB

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Posted 19 November 2011 - 07:29 AM

Also, some have joked this is not Celiac Disease but "Celtic Disease" as this population seems to be impacted so deeply.


After I was diagnosed both of my parents got tested (blood test only, not genetic) and were negative. My dad then proudly declared, "well, she didn't get it from me!" Nice try dad! He may have been born in Africa but his roots are 100% European so we can't rule out that side of the family!
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#21 IrishHeart

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Posted 19 November 2011 - 07:34 AM

Off subject here, but where in Ireland do you like to visit? We are a bit particial to the Dingle Pennisula ourselves.


Dingle is a big Fav, for sure! Galway is lovely-- as is Donegal. Kinsale. Wexford.
We have been all over the place. We drive ourselves through all the back roads and just "wing it". Our honeymoon was 17 counties in 17 days. Best time of my life! Went again with friends and with hub's Mom and aunt (I do not recommend traveling overseas with your MIL :rolleyes: :lol:)
Dublin, believe it or not, is my least fav--too busy!!!. The only place still to get to is Northern Ireland. Hub's maternal side hails from there. His grandfather (paternal side) is from Tipperary. My great Gramma is from Country Clare.
Beautiful place, beautiful people. Celiac friendly ;)
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"Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is. The way we cope with it makes the difference." Virginia Satir

"The strongest of all warriors are these two - time and patience." Leo Tolstoy

"If you want to lift yourself up, lift up someone else" Booker T. Washington

“If idiots could fly, the sky would be like an airport.”― Laura Davenport 

"Do or do not. There is no try. "-  Yoda.

"LTES"  Gem 2014

 

Misdiagnosed for 25+ years; Finally Diagnosed with Celiac  11/01/10.  Double DQ2 genes. This thing tried to kill me. I view Celiac as a fire breathing dragon --and I have run my sword right through his throat.
I. Win. bliss-smiley-emoticon.gif


#22 IrishHeart

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Posted 19 November 2011 - 07:38 AM

OK - roots firmly in New Zealand (third generation), but I divide my time between US and NZ currently (acquired US citizenship through US hub and was long-term resident of CA).

Dad's ancestry English and Scottish, via northern Ireland before heading to NZ. (on First Four Ships - like the Mayflower :lol: in 1850) Mom Welsh through and through. Both families sheep farmers, I grew up on farms.

Hub (also celiac) English and Welsh on his mom's side, English (from the Mayflower :lol: ) and Scottish on his dad's side, with a bit of Native American thrown in somewhere because his hair is square instead of round and he has a native American blood type (B -)

So, two more for Celtic disease :D



The theory holds water, perhaps :)

For some reason, I thought you were from Italy originally...!?

um, his hair is square, Shroomie??
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"Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is. The way we cope with it makes the difference." Virginia Satir

"The strongest of all warriors are these two - time and patience." Leo Tolstoy

"If you want to lift yourself up, lift up someone else" Booker T. Washington

“If idiots could fly, the sky would be like an airport.”― Laura Davenport 

"Do or do not. There is no try. "-  Yoda.

"LTES"  Gem 2014

 

Misdiagnosed for 25+ years; Finally Diagnosed with Celiac  11/01/10.  Double DQ2 genes. This thing tried to kill me. I view Celiac as a fire breathing dragon --and I have run my sword right through his throat.
I. Win. bliss-smiley-emoticon.gif


#23 IrishHeart

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Posted 19 November 2011 - 07:41 AM

After I was diagnosed both of my parents got tested (blood test only, not genetic) and were negative. My dad then proudly declared, "well, she didn't get it from me!" Nice try dad! He may have been born in Africa but his roots are 100% European so we can't rule out that side of the family!


You make a good point..Ha! well, you got it from SOMEONE, right? :)
  • 0

"Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is. The way we cope with it makes the difference." Virginia Satir

"The strongest of all warriors are these two - time and patience." Leo Tolstoy

"If you want to lift yourself up, lift up someone else" Booker T. Washington

“If idiots could fly, the sky would be like an airport.”― Laura Davenport 

"Do or do not. There is no try. "-  Yoda.

"LTES"  Gem 2014

 

Misdiagnosed for 25+ years; Finally Diagnosed with Celiac  11/01/10.  Double DQ2 genes. This thing tried to kill me. I view Celiac as a fire breathing dragon --and I have run my sword right through his throat.
I. Win. bliss-smiley-emoticon.gif


#24 IrishHeart

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Posted 19 November 2011 - 07:42 AM

That Mayflower must have been a big ship :lol:



:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
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"Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is. The way we cope with it makes the difference." Virginia Satir

"The strongest of all warriors are these two - time and patience." Leo Tolstoy

"If you want to lift yourself up, lift up someone else" Booker T. Washington

“If idiots could fly, the sky would be like an airport.”― Laura Davenport 

"Do or do not. There is no try. "-  Yoda.

"LTES"  Gem 2014

 

Misdiagnosed for 25+ years; Finally Diagnosed with Celiac  11/01/10.  Double DQ2 genes. This thing tried to kill me. I view Celiac as a fire breathing dragon --and I have run my sword right through his throat.
I. Win. bliss-smiley-emoticon.gif


#25 bartfull

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Posted 19 November 2011 - 09:22 AM

"um, his hair is square, Shroomie??"

Hmm...must have a mullet. :lol:
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gluten-free since June, 2011

Can't eat soy, corn, or foods high in salicylates.

Nightshades now seem to bother me too.

 

BUT I CAN STILL PLAY MY GUITAR AND THAT"S ALL THAT MATTERS!

 


#26 ElseB

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Posted 19 November 2011 - 11:56 AM

You make a good point..Ha! well, you got it from SOMEONE, right? :)

True! Though to be honest, I don't really care who I got it from. My mom felt horribly guilty after I was diagnosed but I tell her that I'm lucky to have such kind loving parents. I'd rather have bad genes and good parents, than good genes and bad parents!
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#27 IrishHeart

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Posted 19 November 2011 - 01:13 PM

True! Though to be honest, I don't really care who I got it from. My mom felt horribly guilty after I was diagnosed but I tell her that I'm lucky to have such kind loving parents. I'd rather have bad genes and good parents, than good genes and bad parents!


Well said!--and I agree with you completely. :D
After my DX, we did the genetic testing and my Mom felt just as bad as yours.
She went gluten-free 3 months after I did and feels great. :)
I will take longer. :rolleyes:
We feel worse for my Dad, who died in 2008 from many symptoms which point to unDxed celiac. If we only knew...
ah well. We cannot go backward, only forward--and like you, I was blessed with loving, funny and exceptionally giving parents. :)

Lucky us! ;)
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"Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is. The way we cope with it makes the difference." Virginia Satir

"The strongest of all warriors are these two - time and patience." Leo Tolstoy

"If you want to lift yourself up, lift up someone else" Booker T. Washington

“If idiots could fly, the sky would be like an airport.”― Laura Davenport 

"Do or do not. There is no try. "-  Yoda.

"LTES"  Gem 2014

 

Misdiagnosed for 25+ years; Finally Diagnosed with Celiac  11/01/10.  Double DQ2 genes. This thing tried to kill me. I view Celiac as a fire breathing dragon --and I have run my sword right through his throat.
I. Win. bliss-smiley-emoticon.gif


#28 ravenwoodglass

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Posted 19 November 2011 - 02:49 PM

I am an American mutt. Mom's side was Welsh, Irish and English and Dad was German, Dutch and ?. Oddly enough I carry a double copy of a Celiac associated gene that is from either the Middle East or Asia and is uncommon in the US caucasian population. I got one copy from each parent. Forever a mystery at this point.
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Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

#29 navigator

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Posted 19 November 2011 - 04:01 PM

When I started this thread I thought I may have got one or two replies. Never expected the postings that have resulted. I have been fascinated to read people roots and genetic lineage.
My original youtube links were to try and convey the peculiarities of Scottish heritage (which can be very different from rest of UK). I chose them because they depicted a huge historial time for Scotland, and portrayed how Scot's love to have a sing -song.
I would be interested in people's postings regarding this insight into their culture. From this side of the pond, I imagine that there's differences between, for example, New York, small town America, San francisco, Nashville etc.
Try and find something which summons up what makes the difference between where you live.
I've got lots up my sleeve about being Scottish !!!!
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#30 bartfull

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Posted 19 November 2011 - 04:30 PM

Differences between places in the US? Well, I have lived in Connecticut on the East Coast, San Diego on the West Coast, and now I'm in the Black Hills of South Dakota, in the middle of the country.

When I moved from Connecticut to San Diego it was culture shock. The East Coast at that time was more conservative. (This was in the early 70's.) San Diego was more liberal, and so much more fast paced. In Conn. at that time, everything closed by 9PM. In San Diego, everything was open 24 hours.

Now, I'm in a tiny little town that rolls up the sidewalks at 6PM, even on the weekends. Our convenience store has now started staying open 24 hours. (They until just recently, closed at ten.) No one locks their doors here. In the winter, when you go to the grocery store, all of the cars in the parking lot are still running and unlocked. Our biggest crimes are usually DUI's and an occasional domestic disturbence. When any member of the community has a problem, the whole town turns out to help them.

I can't buy white cheddar cheese here. I can't get Starbucks ice cream here. I can't get Cape Cod chips here. The produce is starting to rot before they even unload it from the truck, and although we grow the best beef in the world, we can't get it at our grocery store. Most of the meats they carry come from Mexico. There is absolutely no seafood.

And even on my restricted diet, it is well worth putting up with the lack of amenities. I feel SAFE here. I feel like I'm part of everyone's family here. It's kind of like going back to the 1950's. I love it so much I will never leave. (If any of my friends from East or West want to see me, they have to come here.)

Oh, and one more thing. I have traveled to almost every state in the union, and the Black Hills DEFINITELY has the most beautiful scenery I've ever encountered.

I invite ALL of you to take a vacation here next summer. Come see what I'm talking about - but you'd better bring your own food! And bring me some while you're at it! :lol:
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gluten-free since June, 2011

Can't eat soy, corn, or foods high in salicylates.

Nightshades now seem to bother me too.

 

BUT I CAN STILL PLAY MY GUITAR AND THAT"S ALL THAT MATTERS!

 



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