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Share Your Culture


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#31 pricklypear1971

 
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Posted 19 November 2011 - 04:37 PM

When I started this thread I thought I may have got one or two replies. Never expected the postings that have resulted. I have been fascinated to read people roots and genetic lineage.
My original youtube links were to try and convey the peculiarities of Scottish heritage (which can be very different from rest of UK). I chose them because they depicted a huge historial time for Scotland, and portrayed how Scot's love to have a sing -song.
I would be interested in people's postings regarding this insight into their culture. From this side of the pond, I imagine that there's differences between, for example, New York, small town America, San francisco, Nashville etc.
Try and find something which summons up what makes the difference between where you live.
I've got lots up my sleeve about being Scottish !!!!


Funny. Where you live and where you're from seems to be very different for a lot of people I know.

I'm FROM the southern U.S. I'm IN the southwest. And man oh man are they different!

I've spent the bulk of my adult life searching for buttercream icing (apparently they stop making it west of Ft. Worth), wondering why everyone is obsessed with celebrities but not what their neighbors are up to (because in the south, honey, they ALL want to know your business)....

I love the southwest because there aren't many social restrictions, on the other hand I hate the lack of "civilization" and the traditions I grew up with. Typical American - always wanting something I don't have right now.

Around here, Thanksgiving means it has finally cooled off...and you can open the windows and let the house air out. Rarely are turkeys fried around here, but there are some yummy cranberry and turkey tamales! At Christmas you're as likely to see a wreath of chiles on the door as balsam (the balsam will be fake, the chiles won't), and Santa is probably sitting next to a Saguaro and is bilingual.

We hibernate from May til the monsoon - coming out when it rains. Back in around Sept. till it cools off around Halloween. We party outside from Nov. through April, and quite likely have a prickly pear margarita in hand.

How's that?
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#32 kareng

 
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Posted 19 November 2011 - 04:38 PM

I live in the Kansas City area (Mid-America). I live on the Kansas side. Here most people have yards, even apartment complexes have playgounds, pools, places for kids to ride bikes. We have lots of stuff for kids. Beautiful soccer, baseball & football facilities paid for with taxes. Lots of participation in organized sports. Excellant schools with excellant students. The kind of High Schools where a 3.7 GPA doesn't put you in the top 20% of your class. A big percentage attend religious services.

Today was a nice day, so lots of yard work & neighbors putting up Christmas lights. My 15 yr old & his dad did a service project then went camping with Boy Scouts. This is the Thanksgiving campout so they eat well!

Is that the kind of thing you were thinking of? We don't really have any local traditions on a big scale. We have a shopping area that is known for its Xmas light displays.

http://www.flickr.co...3128/136967516/
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#33 mushroom

 
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Posted 19 November 2011 - 05:12 PM

We don't do Thanksgiving down under, it's just going on summer, but we do do a mid-winter Christmas in June or July (you can have it whenever you want to :D ) where we can serve all the traditional northern Thanksgiving/Christmas foods - sometimes even with Santa making an appearance.

By Christmas summer is (should be) in full swing, so it's camping at the bach/crib, barbecues at the beach, hams, salads and seafood, pavlovas and fruit salad, and the whole country closes down from Dec. 24 through about January 7. If you need a plumber, forget it - make a swimming pool :D We have hundreds of private campgrounds which are jampacked with every kind of tent, home-made camper or caravan, camping vans (filled with foreign tourists who drive on the wrong side of the road), motorhomes , egads I'm starting to feel the need for elbow room :lol: Those who no longer have kids at home do not dream of taking vacation (holiday) at this time of year unless it is to a foreign country - they wait until February/March when school has gone back and the rain does not leak into your tent (so often) if you are still young enough to enjoy tenting :P Give me a good country inn in some remote location with a good chef , some good books, good bush walks where there are no sandflies (anyone who has been here will know why I say that :ph34r:) and I'm a happy camper.
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#34 IrishHeart

 
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Posted 20 November 2011 - 07:55 AM

I grew up in the Boston, Massachusetts area. My neighborhood was an immigrant melting pot and "clan-ish"...everyone knew everyone. Mrs. Jones would make an extra "P B and J sammy" when she made the ones for her own 5 kids if you were playing on the street when she called them inside AND she was also "allowed" to yell at you if you were misbehaving. :lol: There were no worries about children being safe back then because the closest neighbor knew "your business". This could be both good and bad. :rolleyes: The "fruit and veggie" guy came around with a truck once a week and he yelled "Bananas, tomatoes, potatoes, Stawwwwwberries", the milk was still delivered in glass bottles, and Dairy Dan was the ice cream truck that came every summer night, summoning the kids with the jingle we all recognized.

I let myself in after school with my own key from age 6 up and I knew if I needed anything, Mrs. Wolfe next door or my Aunt a few doors down would come to my rescue. Our low-to-middle class neighborhood included people of all cultures and races and I did really not know "color" or "race". We were all just "kids". (Poverty is a great equalizer.) Sundays included afternoon family dinners with my immigrant grandparents and dozens of cousins and aunts and uncles. It was a fun childhood and typical of that era and location in the city.

Not sure if any of these "traditions" exist anymore. :(

I rode my bike everywhere and took the subway at age 8 by myself. We walked to school. No school buses. Sunday outings were to the beach: The North Shore, New Hampshire or Cape Cod. During the week, we busied ourselves at the city pool where I learned to swim like a fish. I went to dancing school and dreamed of being a Radio City Hall Rockette. One lucky summer, I attended Girl Scout camp in the New Hampshire White Mountains for 2 weeks and I thought I had gone to heaven. I LOVED the fresh air, the trees, the mountains, lakes, the night sky so clear--- and the animals. I told my parents: "One day, I will live where it is quiet and clean and I can lay under the stars and watch the birds and animals play."

We had so much available to us in terms of rich New England history.
It was traditional for Bostonians to visit Plymouth Rock, Thoreau's Walden Pond, Salem Village-famous for the Witch trials--Cape Cod, Sturbridge Village, Old Ironsides, cheer for the Red Sox, Celtics, Bruins and Patriots and of course, walk the Freedom Trail.

Christmas meant a tree purchased from the local lot. I do not know how "Santa" managed to bring so many gifts to 3 kids whose parents worked long hours and had no "extras", but it was always magical! :)

Later, I had the incredible joy of teaching college students from all over the world (and probably learned more from them than they ever learned from me.)

I have lived in New York State for the last 28 years and the concept of the close-knit American neighborhood seems to have disappeared. Maybe it still exists in the suburbs? I can get to New York City in 3 hours and enjoy the nightlife, plays, museums and restaurants when I need a "city fix". I live in the countryside now -on a dirt road--and my closest neighbor is miles away. We enjoy the quiet, the clear night skies, the trees, fresh air and plenty of wildlife.

I got my wish. I guess some would call that realizing "the American Dream"? :)
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#35 irish daveyboy

 
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Posted 20 November 2011 - 06:04 PM

If you are interested in reading about Irish Customs and Culture then these are good places to start.

http://www.irishcultureandcustoms.com/


http://www.irishcult...tureCorner.html
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#36 Lisa

 
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Posted 20 November 2011 - 06:09 PM

If you are interested in reading about Irish Customs and Culture then these are good places to start.

http://www.irishcultureandcustoms.com/


[ur]http://www.irishcultureandcustoms.com/CultureCorner/CultureCorner.html[/url]



Hi DAVE! <wavy hand>
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#37 irish daveyboy

 
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Posted 21 November 2011 - 12:19 PM

Hi DAVE! <wavy hand>



Hi Lisa,

Posted Image

Posted Image
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Chronically Ill and lost 56lbs in 3 Months Prior to Diagnosis.
Diagnosed in Nov 2005 after Biopsy and Blood Tests
Cannot tolerate Codex Wheat Starch.
Self Taught Baker.
Bake everything from scratch using naturally gluten-free ingredients.

#38 mbrookes

 
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Posted 21 November 2011 - 02:11 PM

I am a WASP (white, anglo-saxon protestant) and from the deep South (Mississippi) which makes me a member of the only group in America that it is still acceptable to make fun of. Somehow, we don't care.

The area that I live in is an historic district and really is like a small town. We know our neighbors and can safely walk around at night.

This is where Southern Hospitality originated. Strangers are greeted and treated like frends.

I want to emphasize that the racial troubles that we are so famous for are greatly exaggerated. I don't even know anyone that I would think is a racist. There is no denying our trobled past, but we have come a very long way.

I have to brag here. Our food is the very best. Fried chicken, fresh garden vegetables,barbeque, all manner of sweets. Hooray for Southern cooking!
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#39 Juliebove

 
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Posted 21 November 2011 - 04:46 PM

Differences between places in the US? Well, I have lived in Connecticut on the East Coast, San Diego on the West Coast, and now I'm in the Black Hills of South Dakota, in the middle of the country.

When I moved from Connecticut to San Diego it was culture shock. The East Coast at that time was more conservative. (This was in the early 70's.) San Diego was more liberal, and so much more fast paced. In Conn. at that time, everything closed by 9PM. In San Diego, everything was open 24 hours.

Now, I'm in a tiny little town that rolls up the sidewalks at 6PM, even on the weekends. Our convenience store has now started staying open 24 hours. (They until just recently, closed at ten.) No one locks their doors here. In the winter, when you go to the grocery store, all of the cars in the parking lot are still running and unlocked. Our biggest crimes are usually DUI's and an occasional domestic disturbence. When any member of the community has a problem, the whole town turns out to help them.

I can't buy white cheddar cheese here. I can't get Starbucks ice cream here. I can't get Cape Cod chips here. The produce is starting to rot before they even unload it from the truck, and although we grow the best beef in the world, we can't get it at our grocery store. Most of the meats they carry come from Mexico. There is absolutely no seafood.

And even on my restricted diet, it is well worth putting up with the lack of amenities. I feel SAFE here. I feel like I'm part of everyone's family here. It's kind of like going back to the 1950's. I love it so much I will never leave. (If any of my friends from East or West want to see me, they have to come here.)

Oh, and one more thing. I have traveled to almost every state in the union, and the Black Hills DEFINITELY has the most beautiful scenery I've ever encountered.

I invite ALL of you to take a vacation here next summer. Come see what I'm talking about - but you'd better bring your own food! And bring me some while you're at it! :lol:


I got married and moved from the Seattle area to Cape Cod in the 90's. I felt totally out of place. Like a hippie. I couldn't believe the jobs that were available (not many) and what you were expected to do for so little money. Or the questions that were asked on the job applications. Like about your religion or what organizations you belonged to.

Stuff like that wouldn't be allowed here at all! Then when I couldn't get a good job I was told it was because of my Italian name. I was told if I changed it to my maiden name, Dow, I would get a job instantly.
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#40 ElseB

 
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Posted 22 November 2011 - 04:16 PM

Hi Lisa,

Posted Image

Posted Image

Its Diddl!!! (I'm referring to the mouse, for the unitiated :) )
I spent some time in Germany in high school and loved this cartoon character!
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#41 navigator

 
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Posted 30 November 2011 - 10:26 AM

I've really enjoyted reading all the responses. I live in a small market town in Scotland and we have two claims to fame. Firstly it was in Lanark that William Wallace first raised his sword in his fight for Scottish freedom. Secondly, we have the oldest celebration in Scotland, called Lanimers. Click on this link to find out all about. It really is worth a read.
http://www.lanarklan...to_lanimers.asp
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#42 love2travel

 
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Posted 01 December 2011 - 04:11 PM

I am Canadian but my ancestors are mainly from Germany (I have more family in Germany than here in Canada) and Scotland and England. However, I FEEL Croatian! :D

My Mom has an absolutely fascinating book that traces her family back to around 1100 - all handmade with locks of hair, old sketches, photographs, caligraphy - one of her relatives was a servant to Queen Anne in London. Wish I could have met her! Anyway, this book would be priceless. It is falling apart and is made of very old leather.
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#43 Ellie84

 
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Posted 02 December 2011 - 02:12 AM

My family history on fathers' side has been researched by a cousin I didn't know I had. I was researching our genealogy and then I found her. Her grandfather was a brother to mine.

As far as I know our family name will end shortly. My grandfather had 2 sons and 2 daughters, my dad got 2 daughters and my uncle is gay so no kids there. On my grandfathers' brothers' side there is only 1 person to pass it on but I haven't heard of him having a son yet. It would be a shame if the name died out, it's quite rare. As far as I know there are only 13 people in my country with that name, all direct family. In Germany there are more, but it's still rare.
My fathers' lineage can be traced to a very small area in the south of the Netherlands, at the border of Germany and the Netherlands. People from our name have been living in this contested area since approx. 1600. Before that time the name appeared in nothern Germany, at the border with Denmark.

On my mothers' side there is a small part of nobility, her fathers' name shows a connection to a duchy in the south of the Netherlands. Her mother is descended from French hugenots who fled the country because of their religious beliefs and found a safe haven here in the Netherlands.

Funny thing: nobody can say they're truly Dutch: 5 centuries ago large parts of the country were still under water. Dutch people have a very mixed ancestry: Frisians, Francs and Saxons. Some people from the south also have a little Spanish blood because the Netherlands have been Spanish territory for a time.
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27, F, from the beautiful area of Twente in the Netherlands. English is not my first language, so I apologize for any errors.

Symptoms started in 2007, but no link to celiac disease was found until 2009. I learned of celiac disease through the internet, my doctor never recognized it. She put me on a diet before tests were done, so the initial tests failed. My GI advised me to do a gluten provocation, which had to be stopped too soon to take a reliable biopsy. Based on symptoms such as vitamin deficiencies, GI problems and osteopenia my diagnosis now is: glutenintolerant, suspected celiac disease. This diagnosis was in march 2010, and I've been so much better ever since.

#44 Di2011

 
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Posted 02 December 2011 - 02:53 AM

the Netherlands has such a fascinating history. I had no idea!! I may have missed it in my tired and itchy state but can you let us know your family name?
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#45 Ellie84

 
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Posted 02 December 2011 - 03:10 AM

the Netherlands has such a fascinating history. I had no idea!! I may have missed it in my tired and itchy state but can you let us know your family name?


Well, we've heard all about it at school but I never found it really interesting until lately. At school it was all about remembering years and names, while I was more interested in the way society was influenced.
There's a lot of discussion going on about Dutch culture lately, because some people feel that immigrants are doing damage to that culture. In the meantime they forget that nearly all Dutch are partly foreign and that the Netherlands have a long and proud history of being a safe haven for political and ethnical refugees. They brought great wealth and diversity with them and that created our culture.

If people don't mind I'd rather not share my name for privacy reasons. We are talking about health issues here on this forum and I'm trying to rebuild my career after recovering.
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27, F, from the beautiful area of Twente in the Netherlands. English is not my first language, so I apologize for any errors.

Symptoms started in 2007, but no link to celiac disease was found until 2009. I learned of celiac disease through the internet, my doctor never recognized it. She put me on a diet before tests were done, so the initial tests failed. My GI advised me to do a gluten provocation, which had to be stopped too soon to take a reliable biopsy. Based on symptoms such as vitamin deficiencies, GI problems and osteopenia my diagnosis now is: glutenintolerant, suspected celiac disease. This diagnosis was in march 2010, and I've been so much better ever since.




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