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Bread Machine Opinions?


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15 replies to this topic

#1 deannab

 
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Posted 21 November 2011 - 04:16 PM

To buy a bread machine, or not to buy a bread machine... that's the question. It's Christmas time, when appliances are cheaper, and I've really been toying with the idea of purchasing a bread machine. gluten-free bread is expensive, and I'd love to have something fresh (as the bread I purchase is always frozen).

Here are my questions to those with bread machines.

Is having a bread machine really worth it??

Is the bread as good (or better :) ) than- let's say- Udi's?

If you recommend purchasing a bread machine- which one should I go with? I know there are many with gluten-free settings, but I want to know which ones are worth my money.

Does it save you money?

Thanks for your advice!
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#2 Mizzo

 
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Posted 21 November 2011 - 04:38 PM

Sorry to tag onto your topic but.....

I am thinking the same thing. My dd will ONLY eat Udi's white, not multigrain, not Rudi's, not Kinnikinnick , not ANYTHING.

So I question if I can replicate that in a bread machine because otherwise it's not worth to me.

Anyone out there using a bread machine to make plain, simple, white bread like "Udi's" ? If so share your machine and recipe info please.
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#3 misslexi

 
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Posted 22 November 2011 - 12:49 AM

"The Gluten-Free Pantry Favorite Sandwich Bread Mix"

I've made that with and without a breadmaker. It is a mix, but its a decent white bread. I don't think I've tried Udi's...I've stopped even trying to buy commercial gluten free bread. Just from what I know in general of gluten free bread, I doubt there is a whole lot of difference...unless Udi's has the magical ability to be light, fluffy AND gluten free.

But honestly, thats a nice bread mix. I usually slice it thinly because it is on the dense side....but yumm grilled cheese sandwiches!

I can't recall any difference between using the breadmaker, or making it without. Breadmaker may have taken longer though...I was using the oven for something else so it was warm, when I made it without I just placed it on top to rise under a tea towel.

I make a very fluffy banana bread with just a pan and a recipe, but I'm pretty sure thats not the same lol.
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#4 Mizzo

 
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Posted 22 November 2011 - 04:13 AM

Nope not the same at all. I have made that brand in the oven and it's not like Udi's.

Udi's is as light and airy as a gluten-free bread can be. But very very small slices and at $6ish per loaf of 10-12 slices, it's expensive. It's also not always in stock because of it's likeability.

ANyone else know Udi's and use a bread machine?
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#5 fantasticalice

 
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Posted 22 November 2011 - 07:09 AM

I have 3 breadmakers sitting around. You pay shipping and you can have one. Last year I bought a new one with a gluten free setting, took it back. No matter which one you buy you have to mess with the damn thing. You can't just walk away. If you don't time it right and take the paddle out you have a huge hole in your bread. Not for me.

Myself? I would rather have a GOOD cookbook and a standing mixer. I bought mine refurbished for $150 and it's 450 watts. I'd never had one and let me tell you, I use it at least 5 times a week. It mixes everything, including meal-loaf, throw in leftovers that will work together and bake it in a loaf. Kind of like hash. I know, it sounds like jail food but I use tortillas, eggs, cheese, whatever I have, beans, corn, it all bakes up real good.

I'm serious, I live in CA. You pay postage, you can have one of these beasts!

alice
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#6 sa1937

 
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Posted 22 November 2011 - 07:36 AM

I also debated about getting a bread machine after buying just one totally inedible loaf of gluten-free bread. I was looking at a bread machine or a KitchenAid stand mixer. I bought the mixer as I thought it would be far more versatile and I didn't have room for both. It was the right decision for me.

We've had some recent discussions on bread machines. You might want to use that google button at the top right-hand corner of your screen and search the threads that come up.
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#7 thegirlsmom

 
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Posted 22 November 2011 - 10:28 AM

I have 3 breadmakers sitting around. You pay shipping and you can have one. Last year I bought a new one with a gluten free setting, took it back. No matter which one you buy you have to mess with the damn thing. You can't just walk away. If you don't time it right and take the paddle out you have a huge hole in your bread. Not for me.

Myself? I would rather have a GOOD cookbook and a standing mixer. I bought mine refurbished for $150 and it's 450 watts. I'd never had one and let me tell you, I use it at least 5 times a week. It mixes everything, including meal-loaf, throw in leftovers that will work together and bake it in a loaf. Kind of like hash. I know, it sounds like jail food but I use tortillas, eggs, cheese, whatever I have, beans, corn, it all bakes up real good.

I'm serious, I live in CA. You pay postage, you can have one of these beasts!

alice



So I have the mixer. I bought a nice one for making homemade bread and then I found out I had to go Gluten free. Have you found a good bread making cookbook?
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#8 bbuster

 
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Posted 22 November 2011 - 10:30 AM

Myself? I would rather have a GOOD cookbook and a standing mixer.


I agree. I use my KitchenAid stand mixer all the time.

We rarely buy bread - I make homemade. But I rarely make a normal loaf of bread. I do a lot of rolls, buns, mini-loaves, etc. That way I can just bake what will be eaten right away, and freeze the rest of the dough. Then I have some ready-made dough when I just need a little.

I experiment a lot with recipes, and I find all the variables too much to predict rise time and even bake time, so I prefer to eyeball it.
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#9 misslexi

 
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Posted 22 November 2011 - 11:15 AM

Nope not the same at all. I have made that brand in the oven and it's not like Udi's.

Udi's is as light and airy as a gluten-free bread can be. But very very small slices and at $6ish per loaf of 10-12 slices, it's expensive. It's also not always in stock because of it's likeability.

ANyone else know Udi's and use a bread machine?


Really?? Good to know its possible, but thats very expensive for me. Thanks for the info though! I had no idea. I'm not even sure I've seen it in stores here before.
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#10 Pac

 
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Posted 22 November 2011 - 12:50 PM

I've never seen or eaten Udi's bread and I have local brand (czech) bread machine so I can only add a few general tips that might help. (or might be totally useless, who knows :) ).

My bread machine has 12 programs. I only use three:
"rise" - to let dough rise in steady temperature (20-48C) or to make yoghurt or any other fermented food. If you live in cold areas, this is the most important function. I cannot imagine making my sourdough buckwheat bread without it.
"jam" - to make home-made jam
"manual" which is a complete baking program where you set manualy lenght of each step - mix, rise, knead, bake... There are like ten separate steps but I only use baking since I always mix the dough myself and let it rise with the separate "rise" function.
I think I don't even have any "gluten-free bread" option on my bread machine.

As for the fluffy white bread - I have no idea how to make that in a bread machine. My recipe for fluffy bread needs high temperatures for baking and bread machine only bakes in 95-115C. IMHO, if you just want fluffy, yeast leavened bread, you don't need a bread machine, normal oven will do much better.

I am inherently unable to follow or make any exact recipe but here is my best try:

Mix:
2/3 of starch (potato, tapioka, schaer 'Mehl')
1/3 of "flour" - buckwheat, masa harina
(optional) little bit of thickening agent like tapioka flour (gari), guar gum or flax seed.

For half kilo of flour I use about 16g of fresh yeast, two spoons of butter and one teaspoon of honey and a little less than teaspoon of salt. Add water until the the dough is easy to mix with hand but not too liquity. Let it rise for about 30 minutes in oven with pot of hot water, pre-heated oven to 250C, put the bread in and lower temperature to 220C, bake for about 40 minutes. If there are big holes in the bread, there was either too much water or too much yeast or both. :)
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#11 Ginsou

 
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Posted 22 November 2011 - 01:18 PM

I have a Zojirushi bread machine Model BCC-X20 and a Cuisinart stand mixer Model SM-55. I can honestly say my stand mixer gets the most use. I'm also able to purchase both Udi's and Rudi's bread locally. I have never been able to find a recipe that I'm really crazy about that comes close to Rudi's or Udi's bread. I did make a loaf of King Arthur white bread that was delicious straight out of the oven, but within 1 day it was just like all other gluten free breads. I am anxious to try their multi-grain bread, just haven't had the time.
I have Annalise Roberts Gluten Free Baking Classics for the Bread Machine cookbook that gives specific recipes for the Z machine, and have only tried 1 recipe that came out so-so.I did not find that the Z machine with 2 paddles mixed the bread any different than a machine with 1 paddle. The Z machine makes a loaf of bread that is more horizontal than vertical.....but you are left with 2 holes in the bread from the paddles and you need to use a 2 lb. recipe.

I would go with a stand mixer....Kitchen Aid usually has a rebate coupon around the holidays, which helps.
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#12 Pamela1077

 
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Posted 23 November 2011 - 09:57 PM

I have 3 breadmakers sitting around. You pay shipping and you can have one. Last year I bought a new one with a gluten free setting, took it back. No matter which one you buy you have to mess with the damn thing. You can't just walk away. If you don't time it right and take the paddle out you have a huge hole in your bread. Not for me.

Myself? I would rather have a GOOD cookbook and a standing mixer. I bought mine refurbished for $150 and it's 450 watts. I'd never had one and let me tell you, I use it at least 5 times a week. It mixes everything, including meal-loaf, throw in leftovers that will work together and bake it in a loaf. Kind of like hash. I know, it sounds like jail food but I use tortillas, eggs, cheese, whatever I have, beans, corn, it all bakes up real good.

I'm serious, I live in CA. You pay postage, you can have one of these beasts!

alice



Out of the breadmakers that you have bought, which brand or model do you recommend? I too am looking at buying one. I have been on this gluten free diet for 3 weeks or so and I miss bread so bad. My kids have went back to white bread as we can't afford $4/ loaf when we pay $1 a loaf. Thanks, Pam
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#13 x0xteenyx0x

 
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Posted 24 November 2011 - 02:44 PM

I was also looking into buying a bread machine. I made the gluten free pantry french bread and pizza mix in the oven the other week and it turned out pretty good (a little heavy, but good), so i thought a bread machine would make the bread more light and fluffy. But looking into this i see most people say it turns out better in the oven, and more of a mess to clean up with the machine..

What do you guys think?

Christine
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#14 mamaw

 
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Posted 24 November 2011 - 06:35 PM

We love the zorjirushi--- a true workhorse that will last for years...
There also is the Bready which is SIMPLE to use but you need to buy the gluten-free mixes for that one&it is pricey..I know a couple who owns this & they love how simple it is but again on sale $50.00 off but the mixes gets expensive....
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#15 Korwyn

 
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Posted 25 November 2011 - 05:58 AM

Ours is a Breadman Pro which has a gluten-free cycle. Got it for $99 on sale at Amazon. Love it! It comes with a recipe for a generic white bread, that while not 'light' is actually a very good recipe. I replaced the soy flour with sorghum and it works really well. It's the recipe that I used to make bread for our dressing for dinner yesterday.
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Undiagnosed for 20 years since first symptoms.
March 2009 - Negative Blood work
April 24, 2009 - Gluten-free
April 29, 2009 - Notably positive response to gluten-free Diet.
May 2, 2009 Dairy Free
May 6, 2009, Soy Free
May 27, 2009 Enterolab Results: Positive Anti-gliadin IgA, tTG IgA, Casein, HLA DQ2.2, HLA DQ8
June 4, 2009 Refined sugar free (except Raw Honey, pure Maple syrup)
June 29, 2009, Dad diagnosed Celiac by GI specialist via blood work and dietary response.
July 2009, Dad's gene test: double DQ8! Thanks Dad - I'll try to get you something nice for Christmas! :)
August 8, 2009 Really Soy free this time - Thanks Blue Diamond for the soy lecithin in the almond milk! :(




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