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Can Someone Explain My Results?


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15 replies to this topic

#1 dain.sorensen

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Posted 22 November 2011 - 02:16 PM

After 2 and 1/2 years of feeling crummy, snorting steroid sprays, eating ant-acids and having trouble breathing I asked my ear nose and throat speciaist if all of my problems could be from food. He said he did not think so because he sent me for a skin test for allergies and they were all negative. But after reading on the internet about gluten and other allergies, I asked if he would send me for a blood test. I got my blood test back and he tells me my IgA and IgG are higher then they should be. He said the IgA was worse then the IgG. He then went on to tell me I most likely have a gluten sensitivity/intolerance/celiac. So I have dropped gluten and feel quite a bit better, but at times I get all my symptoms back. I watch my diet closely and know I have not eaten any gluten.

Did the positive tests for IgA and IgG indicate I have a problem with gluten? Or did these tests actually say there something is bothering your immune system and these 2 anti-bodies are elevated? What I am wondering is if these tests are completly specific to Gluten or could these high results be from my body reacting to another subsstance such as dairy, soy, etc...

Some clarification would be fantastic!

I have talked to a friend who is a nutritionist and she told me that these blood tests are not specific. She said any food could be raising these antibodies.

Please comment if you have any knowledge that could help me.

Thanks
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#2 ravenwoodglass

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Posted 22 November 2011 - 03:57 PM

It would be helpful if you could post the actual test results, the names of the tests and the lab reference range.
It does sound like your in the right place. If you are going to be having an endoscopy then you need to keep eating gluten until that is done. Some doctors will diagnose on blood tests that are positive and response to the diet.
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Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

#3 dain.sorensen

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Posted 22 November 2011 - 04:03 PM

It would be helpful if you could post the actual test results, the names of the tests and the lab reference range.
It does sound like your in the right place. If you are going to be having an endoscopy then you need to keep eating gluten until that is done. Some doctors will diagnose on blood tests that are positive and response to the diet.


But do you know if there is Gluten specific blood tests? or are the blood tests that doctors order just to check to see if your antibodes are up or down? Would the same blood test be done for someone with a possible soy or dairy allergy?
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#4 Metoo

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Posted 22 November 2011 - 04:39 PM

These are celiac specific, it's the bodies antibody reaction to gluten. Your doctor is correct you should pursue a endoscopy biopsy for celiac.
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#5 dain.sorensen

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Posted 22 November 2011 - 04:51 PM

These are celiac specific, it's the bodies antibody reaction to gluten. Your doctor is correct you should pursue a endoscopy biopsy for celiac.


Can you ask for blood tests to be done on other specific proteins? (soy/dairy)
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#6 mushroom

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Posted 22 November 2011 - 05:04 PM

The following are the celiac specific blood tests:

Anti-Gliadin (AGA) IgA
Anti-Gliadin (AGA) IgG
Anti-Endomysial (EMA) IgA
Anti-Tissue Transglutaminase (tTG) IgA
Deamidated Gliadin Peptide (DGP) IgA and IgG
Total Serum IgA

Are these the tests you got your results on?

There is no specific equivalent panel to test for intolerance to dairy or soy. A majority of these intolerant of gluten will be intolerant of dairy lactose until they heal from the gluten damage.
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Neroli


"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

------------

Caffeine free 1973
Lactose free 1990
(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's
Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004
Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007
Soy free March 2008
Nightshade free Feb 2009
Citric acid free June 2009
Potato starch free July 2009
(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009
Legume free March 2010
Now tolerant of lactose

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

#7 dain.sorensen

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Posted 22 November 2011 - 05:27 PM

The following are the celiac specific blood tests:

Anti-Gliadin (AGA) IgA
Anti-Gliadin (AGA) IgG
Anti-Endomysial (EMA) IgA
Anti-Tissue Transglutaminase (tTG) IgA
Deamidated Gliadin Peptide (DGP) IgA and IgG
Total Serum IgA

Are these the tests you got your results on?

There is no specific equivalent panel to test for intolerance to dairy or soy. A majority of these intolerant of gluten will be intolerant of dairy lactose until they heal from the gluten damage.


I see my family doctor this friday to go over results, so I will post them when I have them. All the information I have is from my specialist telling me over the phone.

I def feel better since dropping gluten but something else is still bugging me. My main symptoms since I have had problems with my health are, nasal inflammation, post nasal drip, fatigue, not so fun bathroom breaks. I am almost positive Soy is contributing to my problems since going gluten free. I have now dropped Soy, but have obviously been wondering if there was a test for it. I did not want to drop it if it was not the problem.

Even if there is no exact test for Soy/Dairy, the immune system would still be on alert if something was bugging it though....and this would show up in the blood...? or am I wrong...
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#8 mushroom

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Posted 22 November 2011 - 06:17 PM

You can have ELISA tests for food allergies and skinprick tests also, but there is considerable dispute about their reliability in someone whose immune system is already revved up by gluten. Your autoimmunity is hyper right now and may react to a lot of things that it will not react to later when all the little antibodies to gluten are allowed to go off duty.

Notwithstanding that, many of us are intolerant to dairy (many more initially who can tolerate it later) and many more of us are soy intolerant as well as gluten intolerant, so those are both possible additional intolerances you are experiencing. If you want to feel better, drop them all from your diet, eat a clean, whole foods diet of meat, fish, fruits, veggies, nuts, seeds, rice that you prepare yourself and see if everythng calms down. Then you can individually challenge dairy (try hard cheese first - that may be okay with very little lactose - then yogurt - also low lactose.) If both of those are okay try some milk or ice cream (heavy lactose) and that will tell you what you need to avoid. Then you can try something like some edamame beans in a stir fry to test out the soy, or eat a little tofu. At this point, try to avoid all processed foods and all the gluten replacement foods (except perhaps some Tinkyada pasta) - and eat foods that are easy to digest to promote the healing process. :) Quickest way to feel better.
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Neroli


"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

------------

Caffeine free 1973
Lactose free 1990
(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's
Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004
Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007
Soy free March 2008
Nightshade free Feb 2009
Citric acid free June 2009
Potato starch free July 2009
(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009
Legume free March 2010
Now tolerant of lactose

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

#9 Skylark

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Posted 22 November 2011 - 06:21 PM

Tests for food intolerances are notoriously inaccurate. The best thing is to do exactly what you have done - remove it from your diet and see if you feel better.
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#10 rosetapper23

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Posted 22 November 2011 - 08:46 PM

Just wanted to add that soy is good for NO ONE, so....since many celiacs cannot tolerate soy and it's bad for everyone's health, you might consider eliminating it, as well. It's a myth that soy is good for you.
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#11 dain.sorensen

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Posted 23 November 2011 - 09:58 AM

Just wanted to add that soy is good for NO ONE, so....since many celiacs cannot tolerate soy and it's bad for everyone's health, you might consider eliminating it, as well. It's a myth that soy is good for you.


Can you explain to me why Soy is bad for someones health?
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#12 Skylark

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Posted 23 November 2011 - 10:43 AM

Can you explain to me why Soy is bad for someones health?

This article summarizes the health issues with soy pretty well, and the importance of fermentation for healthy soy-based foods. Sorry it doesn't have peer-reviewed references but the anti-nutrient and goitrogenic properties of soy are well-documented in the medical literature.
http://americannutri...whole-soy-story
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#13 dain.sorensen

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Posted 23 November 2011 - 11:07 AM

This article summarizes the health issues with soy pretty well, and the importance of fermentation for healthy soy-based foods. Sorry it doesn't have peer-reviewed references but the anti-nutrient and goitrogenic properties of soy are well-documented in the medical literature.
http://americannutri...whole-soy-story


Thanks for the article.
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#14 Korwyn

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Posted 23 November 2011 - 11:17 AM

I def feel better since dropping gluten but something else is still bugging me. My main symptoms since I have had problems with my health are, nasal inflammation, post nasal drip, fatigue, not so fun bathroom breaks. I am almost positive Soy is contributing to my problems since going gluten free. I have now dropped Soy, but have obviously been wondering if there was a test for it. I did not want to drop it if it was not the problem


My recent reply here. I break out many of my symptoms with what I've found them to be linked to as a primary cause.
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Undiagnosed for 20 years since first symptoms.
March 2009 - Negative Blood work
April 24, 2009 - Gluten-free
April 29, 2009 - Notably positive response to gluten-free Diet.
May 2, 2009 Dairy Free
May 6, 2009, Soy Free
May 27, 2009 Enterolab Results: Positive Anti-gliadin IgA, tTG IgA, Casein, HLA DQ2.2, HLA DQ8
June 4, 2009 Refined sugar free (except Raw Honey, pure Maple syrup)
June 29, 2009, Dad diagnosed Celiac by GI specialist via blood work and dietary response.
July 2009, Dad's gene test: double DQ8! Thanks Dad - I'll try to get you something nice for Christmas! :)
August 8, 2009 Really Soy free this time - Thanks Blue Diamond for the soy lecithin in the almond milk! :(

#15 dain.sorensen

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Posted 30 November 2011 - 12:49 PM

This reply is quite late, I appologize. The only two red flags my doctor said he seen in my blood test results were, IgA Gliaden was almost 20, and my IgG was 13 or 14. He explained that these are both supposed to be below 10. I had also gone gluten free for a short period of time when I had my blood test.
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