Jump to content



   arrowShare this page:
   

   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

 
Ads by Google:
Celiac.com Sponsor:                                    


Photo
- - - - -

Blood Type And Celiac


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 GlutenFreeSA

GlutenFreeSA

    New Community Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 23 November 2011 - 07:47 AM

Hi I have been wondering if specific blood type is more prone to Celiac than others? I am O- and have had conversation with several people with Celiac and amazingly most of them were O- coincidence?
  • 0
glutenfreesa

Celiac.com Sponsor:

#2 Jestgar

Jestgar

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,755 posts

Posted 23 November 2011 - 07:57 AM

No.

see this thread:

http://www.celiac.co...our-blood-type/

Most Caucasians are type O

http://www.redcrossb...ood/blood-types
  • 0
"But then, in all honesty, if scientists don't play god, who will?"
- James Watson

My sources are unreliable, but their information is fascinating.
- Ashleigh Brilliant

Leap, and the net will appear.

#3 kwylee

kwylee

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 303 posts

Posted 23 November 2011 - 08:59 AM

It's an interesting thought since type O is the original bloodtype on the planet, and they only ate meat, vegetables, seeds & some roots, but I wasn't surprised to read that gluten intolerance is common across all blood types, and I think that's because the introduction of grain into our diets is relatively new by evolution standards. Perhaps if modern science researched the makeup of someone who is truly NOT intolerant to gluten in the least, they may be able to discern much more than blood type as the reason. But first they'd have to find someone like that - I wonder if they could.
  • 0
K Wylee

Gluten Intolerant, Positive test, June 2010
Casein sensitivity, Positive test, June 2010
Reactive to soy, most processed foods & preservatives, June 2010

#4 Jestgar

Jestgar

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,755 posts

Posted 23 November 2011 - 09:14 AM

It's an interesting thought since type O is the original bloodtype on the planet,

Not true:

http://www.bibliotec...ncia_life24.htm

Given the above facts, blood types AB and O seem to be a combination of A+A, A+B or B+B (AB as exclusive and O as inclusive) - whereas A and B themselves appear to be separate original groups. Only if the father and mother are "A AND B" or "B AND A" blood type can the child then be born with any of the human blood groups A, B, AB or O. This negates current theory that O is the original blood type, especially since the man-apes have little or no O blood type and no AB blood type at all.
A and B are very likely the originals. Chimp + Gorilla? The spot at which the territories of the chimps and gorillas meet is also the region of the oldest human skulls in Africa


  • 0
"But then, in all honesty, if scientists don't play god, who will?"
- James Watson

My sources are unreliable, but their information is fascinating.
- Ashleigh Brilliant

Leap, and the net will appear.

#5 kwylee

kwylee

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 303 posts

Posted 23 November 2011 - 09:24 AM

That's excellent info, thanks!
  • 0
K Wylee

Gluten Intolerant, Positive test, June 2010
Casein sensitivity, Positive test, June 2010
Reactive to soy, most processed foods & preservatives, June 2010

#6 lovegrov

lovegrov

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,536 posts

Posted 23 November 2011 - 09:25 PM

The blood type theory has been proposed and is bunk.

richard
  • 0

#7 mushroom

mushroom

    Mushroom

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,448 posts

Posted 23 November 2011 - 09:50 PM

I knew it all along!!! I am chimpanzee :D , hub is GORILLA!!
  • 0
Neroli


"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

------------

Caffeine free 1973
Lactose free 1990
(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's
Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004
Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007
Soy free March 2008
Nightshade free Feb 2009
Citric acid free June 2009
Potato starch free July 2009
(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009
Legume free March 2010
Now tolerant of lactose

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

#8 General Ludd

General Ludd

    New Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • Pip
  • 11 posts

Posted 04 April 2012 - 06:58 AM

Hi I have been wondering if specific blood type is more prone to Celiac than others? I am O- and have had conversation with several people with Celiac and amazingly most of them were O- coincidence?


It is almost certainly a coincidence, but the question is certainly a valid one. Type O blood is the most common blood type, therefore a sample of the population will return a larger number of celiac patients with type O blood, a slightly smaller number with type A and much smaller numbers of the other types. Most people with celiac also have dark hair. It is a natural and wholly expected human tendency to seek out patterns. Once we think we see a pattern we need to verify it. The scientific method is an entirely accessible system designed to control for bias and to filter valid patterns from invalid ones.

This issue of blood types and digestive traits was promoted by a naturopath by the name of Peter J. D'Adamo. (D'Adamo, Peter J, and Catherine Whitney 4 Blood Types, 4 Diets: Eat Right 4/For Your Type, New York: Putnam and Sons. 1996. 392pp). This book is, in my mind, a great example of unverified pattern seeking. Nowhere in the entire text does he cite any valid, repeatable research supporting his claims, many of which are quite significant. One claim that caused me great concern was when he stated quite authoritatively that people with type O blood are prone to hyperthyroidism (ibid. p 53). There is absolutely no evidence to support this claim. It is true, however that a larger number of people with type O blood will have hyperthyroidism because there are more people with type O blood. The entire book is basically an untested hypothesis published as definitive science. While some may claim it is possible he is right, it is also possible he is quite wrong. Without evidence there is nothing there but an idea that needs validation.

A good scientist uses his/her intuition to ask good questions, but relies on the rigors of the scientific method to establish if his questions lead to valid answers or not. D'Adamo cuts past the testing and jumps to certitude without any facts to back up his claims. Anecdotes (which he seems to rely on the most for his "proof") are not valid because they represent cases he has selected to prove his point, not randomly sampled subjects compared to a cohort of control subjects.

We must not leave science only to the scientists. Each one of us must take the responsibility to be a critical thinker and consumer and promoter of verifiable and accurate information. This is especially important for those of us who need good, reliable information to protect ourselves from the dangers of exposure to gluten and other toxins (to us). While D'Adamo's book has a disclaimer stating that the authors claim no liability for their recommendations, and insist the book be used as a source of "information to help the reader cooperate with physicians and health care providers..." ([i]Ibid p. IX). However. like the "nutritional supplements" sold in health food stores and pharmacies, the fine print about lack of scientific evidence is decidedly overshadowed by the large print that makes clear and definitive medical claims.

Sorry for the wordy and probably overly pedantic response. Please do not take this as a criticism of you. It is always good to ask questions.
  • 0
I have been lactose intolerant since 1990. I went gluten free in 2010 after bloating, cramping, increasingly foul gas, and uncomfortable itching on the tail end of things was becoming unbearable. After a short time without gluten I'd felt better than I'd felt in years. I generally eat a low-fat, high-fiber diet full of colorful foods. I eat meat only when I eat out (at places I trust).

My IgA came back at low-normal levels, and I have not had gut biopsy for celiac because I was gluten-free for at least a month before I could get in to see a GI specialist. By then I wasn't about to eat gluten again just so I could have an invasive procedure that might tell me I shouldn't eat something I already know is making me sick.

#9 Skylark

Skylark

    Glutenologist

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,490 posts

Posted 04 April 2012 - 07:29 AM

Hi I have been wondering if specific blood type is more prone to Celiac than others? I am O- and have had conversation with several people with Celiac and amazingly most of them were O- coincidence?

Given that type O is the most common in the US, it's probably coincidence. :)
  • 0


0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Celiac.com Sponsors: