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Blood Type And Celiac
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Hi I have been wondering if specific blood type is more prone to Celiac than others? I am O- and have had conversation with several people with Celiac and amazingly most of them were O- coincidence?

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It's an interesting thought since type O is the original bloodtype on the planet, and they only ate meat, vegetables, seeds & some roots, but I wasn't surprised to read that gluten intolerance is common across all blood types, and I think that's because the introduction of grain into our diets is relatively new by evolution standards. Perhaps if modern science researched the makeup of someone who is truly NOT intolerant to gluten in the least, they may be able to discern much more than blood type as the reason. But first they'd have to find someone like that - I wonder if they could.

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It's an interesting thought since type O is the original bloodtype on the planet,

Not true:

http://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/ciencia/esp_ciencia_life24.htm

Given the above facts, blood types AB and O seem to be a combination of A+A, A+B or B+B (AB as exclusive and O as inclusive) - whereas A and B themselves appear to be separate original groups. Only if the father and mother are "A AND B" or "B AND A" blood type can the child then be born with any of the human blood groups A, B, AB or O. This negates current theory that O is the original blood type, especially since the man-apes have little or no O blood type and no AB blood type at all.

A and B are very likely the originals. Chimp + Gorilla? The spot at which the territories of the chimps and gorillas meet is also the region of the oldest human skulls in Africa

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That's excellent info, thanks!

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The blood type theory has been proposed and is bunk.

richard

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I knew it all along!!! I am chimpanzee :D , hub is GORILLA!!

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Hi I have been wondering if specific blood type is more prone to Celiac than others? I am O- and have had conversation with several people with Celiac and amazingly most of them were O- coincidence?

It is almost certainly a coincidence, but the question is certainly a valid one. Type O blood is the most common blood type, therefore a sample of the population will return a larger number of celiac patients with type O blood, a slightly smaller number with type A and much smaller numbers of the other types. Most people with celiac also have dark hair. It is a natural and wholly expected human tendency to seek out patterns. Once we think we see a pattern we need to verify it. The scientific method is an entirely accessible system designed to control for bias and to filter valid patterns from invalid ones.

This issue of blood types and digestive traits was promoted by a naturopath by the name of Peter J. D'Adamo. (D'Adamo, Peter J, and Catherine Whitney 4 Blood Types, 4 Diets: Eat Right 4/For Your Type, New York: Putnam and Sons. 1996. 392pp). This book is, in my mind, a great example of unverified pattern seeking. Nowhere in the entire text does he cite any valid, repeatable research supporting his claims, many of which are quite significant. One claim that caused me great concern was when he stated quite authoritatively that people with type O blood are prone to hyperthyroidism (ibid. p 53). There is absolutely no evidence to support this claim. It is true, however that a larger number of people with type O blood will have hyperthyroidism because there are more people with type O blood. The entire book is basically an untested hypothesis published as definitive science. While some may claim it is possible he is right, it is also possible he is quite wrong. Without evidence there is nothing there but an idea that needs validation.

A good scientist uses his/her intuition to ask good questions, but relies on the rigors of the scientific method to establish if his questions lead to valid answers or not. D'Adamo cuts past the testing and jumps to certitude without any facts to back up his claims. Anecdotes (which he seems to rely on the most for his "proof") are not valid because they represent cases he has selected to prove his point, not randomly sampled subjects compared to a cohort of control subjects.

We must not leave science only to the scientists. Each one of us must take the responsibility to be a critical thinker and consumer and promoter of verifiable and accurate information. This is especially important for those of us who need good, reliable information to protect ourselves from the dangers of exposure to gluten and other toxins (to us). While D'Adamo's book has a disclaimer stating that the authors claim no liability for their recommendations, and insist the book be used as a source of "information to help the reader cooperate with physicians and health care providers..." (Ibid p. IX). However. like the "nutritional supplements" sold in health food stores and pharmacies, the fine print about lack of scientific evidence is decidedly overshadowed by the large print that makes clear and definitive medical claims.

Sorry for the wordy and probably overly pedantic response. Please do not take this as a criticism of you. It is always good to ask questions.

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Hi I have been wondering if specific blood type is more prone to Celiac than others? I am O- and have had conversation with several people with Celiac and amazingly most of them were O- coincidence?

Given that type O is the most common in the US, it's probably coincidence. :)

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    • Hello, I see you posted this a long while ago, and perhaps--I hope-- it's no longer a matter of concern, but I thought I'd mention that shortly before I was diagnosed for celiac's, I had distinct yellow blotches on the corners of my eyelids toward my nose. Some months after I had stopped eating gluten, the yellow gradually went away, and--as it just reappeared now several years later, I googled the issue again.  I am only speculating here, but I do believe it is related to liver problems, which, in turn, are related to celiac's. I don't think liver function tests cover all aspects of liver health. I say this because when I was pregnant I developed a temporary liver condition called interhepatic colestasis of pregnancy (ICP), but my liver function tests had been fine. (The condition is diagnosed based on bile levels in the blood, not on liver function). I discovered upon some research that (of course!) ICP  can be associated with celiac's disease.  My hunch is this-- that celiac's presents two problems to the liver: 1) the malabsorption of nutrients--esp. Vit. K2-- that are vital liver health; 2) since gluten registers as a toxin to the immune system (I think?), perhaps the liver gets overloaded processing so much toxic material. Or perhaps there's some other reason. At any rate, poor liver health and celiac's do seem to be linked, according to a few articles I've found. Anyway, hope your problems are resolved now.  
    • my daughter did stool test from enterolab but this gluten sensitive blood test is from http://requestatest.com/tests/search    
    • OK, was your daughter tested by a doctor or did you do one of these order online stool tests? And the same question goes for your tests. Can you give a link to the company?
    • NO. Approx. 1/3 of the population carries the genes for celiac but that does NOT mean they will ever present with celiac. Only a small percentage of them will. A gene test is really used more to rule out celiac rather than to diagnose it. What I meant was that since your daughter is diagnosed and IF you carry one or both of the celiac genes then there is a greater chance you are celiac or "early stages" especially in light of your symptoms. All 3 of those factors weighed together was what I was referring to.
    • by the way, I do find the lab who does the gluten sensitive test Gluten Allergy IgE Test This test is used to determine if a person has an allergic reaction to gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye.  Roughly 1 in 30 adults and 1 in 40 children suffer from a Gluten Allergy.  An IgE test looks for antibodies which develop in a person who has a particular allergy.  Gluten Allergy can display symptoms similar to other conditions such as Celiac Disease.  Unlike an allergy, Celiac Disease can do permanent harm to the body if left untreated.  Allergy testing when a person is experiencing symptoms can help identify or rule out an allergy as the cause.

      Gluten Allergy is typically less severe than other Gluten related conditions like Celiac Disease.  People with Gluten Allergy will often experience abdominal discomfort, bloating, gas, constipation, or diarrhea when they eat products containing gluten.  These symptoms usually stop when a person cuts gluten out of their diet.

      A Gluten Allergy IgE test can be ordered to help determine if someone allergic to gluten.  This test can also be ordered when a person is testing for Celiac Disease and has had negative results on Celiac specific antibody tests.  An allergy test can also be ordered prior to Celiac testing to rule out Gluten Allergy as a likely cause for a person’s symptoms.
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