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Need gluten-free Brands Of Wild Rice
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I'm looking to go rice free (but not wild rice free because it's different) and I wanted to try some wild rice. However, I find out that Lundberg Farms uses oats as a cover crop O_O I am very allergic to oats so I avoid them like the plague. I'm wondering what other brands of wild rice there are that would be safe. Any suggestions? I've only found one brand, Roland, but it looks like there might be cross contamination issues with it so I will have to call them on Monday.

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I'm not sure you have the correct information.

Wild rice grows in water:

http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/afcm/wildrice.html

And oats grow conventionally:

http://www.heirloom-organics.com/guide/va/guidetogrowingoats.html

Also, Lundberg states (quite sensibly) that they grow nitrogen fixers between rice crops:

http://www.lundberg.com/Commitment/Practices.aspx

As the weather allows, between rice crops, we plant nitrogen-fixing legumes as a cover crop on our organic and Eco-Farmed fields. "Planting purple vetch on our fields minimizes the need for supplemental fertilizer," says Lundberg farm manager, Marc Breckenridge

Along with vetch, we have experimented with bell beans, strawberry clover, adzuki beans, and clovers from Australia."We like to experiment with new cover crops to see if we can improve on our current method," Harlan explains.
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So what you're saying is the wild rice wouldn't come into contact with the oats at all? What about being processed on the same equipment? I'm pretty sensitive. I'm pretty sure oats are the reason I can't have Bob's Red Mill. Here's a discussion of how Lundberg does use oats as a cover crop, including links, as your link doesn't seem to say it.

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Hi Joe--I'm also pretty sensitive (and oat sensitive) and eat lots of Lundberg rices.

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Thanks for those links.

That slide show says they plow it back into the soil. It isn't processed on any equipment...

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I got a kind of wild rice that was grown traditionally and harvested by native Americans in canoes. You should look for those kinds.

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I got a kind of wild rice that was grown traditionally and harvested by native Americans in canoes. You should look for those kinds.

That's cool!

What's it called?

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Thanks for those links.

That slide show says they plow it back into the soil. It isn't processed on any equipment...

I mean the rice that is grown with the oats come into contact with the wild rice when they are being processed. That would be the way that the wild rice gets contaminated with oats.

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I'm going to call the Lundbergs on Monday. I'll Let you know what they say. They have always been nice people concerned with the quality of thier product.

These oats that are grown in the rice fields would not be cc'd with wheat. However, if you are very sensitive to oats, that might be a problem. I'll report back. My understanding is that they plant different things every year so maybe we can talk them out of oats in the future? :)

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I mean the rice that is grown with the oats come into contact with the wild rice when they are being processed. That would be the way that the wild rice gets contaminated with oats.

I think we posted at the same time. The oats are not grown at the same time as the rice. The oats or other plants are grown in the off season. They are composted back in, to enrich the soil. At least, according to the link about off season crops.

Rice is grown in a lot of water. If you read the link, they mentioned something about draining the water or the oats would rot & die.

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Typically cover crops are not allowed to sprout/seed/etc., its part of the nitrogen fixing process (although I usually hear about legumes, but whatever...). I doubt oats are fixing nitrogen, they are probably preventing erosion and adding biomass but again, whatever...

I don't know if your problem is with the plant or the seed.

There's always the chance some do sprout and are in the soil...

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Thanks Kareng, I appreciate that.

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That's cool!

What's it called?

This was about wild rice harvested by canoe. I can't remember the name of the one I got. I did a google search and a bunch come up.

Edited to add: I forgot that I have the name written down somewhere. It was Fanci Food. It was much better priced than a lot of the others too.

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I found a brand, Goose Valley, that makes wild rice. But then I read this part from their website "We have found that barley straw is effective in controlling the moss in our irrigation system

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I've been using the organic Canadian wild rice from North Bay Trading Co for years. Pricey, but you might want to check them out:

http://www.northbaytrading.com/canadian-organic-wild-rice/

Their products are marked gluten free but I have never asked about other crops that may be grown. I think they just grow rice.

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I found a brand, Goose Valley, that makes wild rice. But then I read this part from their website "We have found that barley straw is effective in controlling the moss in our irrigation system

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I've been using the organic Canadian wild rice from North Bay Trading Co for years. Pricey, but you might want to check them out:

http://www.northbaytrading.com/canadian-organic-wild-rice/

Their products are marked gluten free but I have never asked about other crops that may be grown. I think they just grow rice.

They sell dried veggies and fruit too. They look interesting. I don't see any gluten grains on their site.

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I talked to Diana at Lundberg Farms.

First, their equipment and machinery is only used for their products. There is no wheat grown anywhere in that area.

Wild rice is a slightly different plant then " regular" rice. It is grown the same way as " regular" rice.

Cover crops - these are grown completely by themselves in the off season. No rice is grown with them. It's usually purple vetch, a type of bean &/ or mustard plant. It is never wheat. Oat seeds are used in the mix of cover crops to help the seeds " flow" out of the airplane that is seeding the fields. If any oats grow , it is removed with the other cover crops ( I didn't ask how, probably some sort of harvesting machine). Then the left over bits are tilled back into the soil and allowed to decompose. They are very concious about not wanting anyof the cover crops to be mixed in with the rice.

The website has alot of info, too. If you have more questions, she said to feel free to call. The number is on the website.

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I talked to Diana at Lundberg Farms.

First, their equipment and machinery is only used for their products. There is no wheat grown anywhere in that area.

Wild rice is a slightly different plant then " regular" rice. It is grown the same way as " regular" rice.

Cover crops - these are grown completely by themselves in the off season. No rice is grown with them. It's usually purple vetch, a type of bean &/ or mustard plant. It is never wheat. Oat seeds are used in the mix of cover crops to help the seeds " flow" out of the airplane that is seeding the fields. If any oats grow , it is removed with the other cover crops ( I didn't ask how, probably some sort of harvesting machine). Then the left over bits are tilled back into the soil and allowed to decompose. They are very concious about not wanting anyof the cover crops to be mixed in with the rice.

The website has alot of info, too. If you have more questions, she said to feel free to call. The number is on the website.

Thanks! This has been very helpful. I am sitting here glutened bad from "Rice river farms dry roasted wild rice". I ate it plain, so, I know it's the rice. I got sick while eating it, instant migraine and hives on my lips, chest, and back, followed by brain fog, joint pain, exhaustion, depression, sinuses swelled shut, my whole body is swollen, just call me Mrs. Puff after Spongebob crashes the boat. It claimed to be gluten-free, but is manufactured in a facility with wheat, rye and barley, so I venture to guess that I got a big dose of CC. They had a disclaimer on their website claiming CC could be an issue with their products. I'm sicker than sick right now. I'm on day 3 of glutened hell, can't stop the depressive crying....sheeeesh. The hives are gone, thanks to a whole lot of benadryl! But all the other systems remain. It usually last 5-7 days.

It looks like I'll have to give Lundberg a try next time, however, I will not be in the mood for wild rice for a long long time even though I love it. There's just something about being violently ill that turns a person off on a food for a long time.. Kind of like being food poisoned...

I love your Avatar and the salmon breath quote. I laugh everytime I see that silly expression on your dogs face....to funny!

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