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Cold Weather Makes Me Hungry...
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6 posts in this topic

Oh man, I am having the worst winter munchies!

I could just eat and eat...I want SWEETS!

There's a box of KA chocolate cake mix in my pantry with my name on it...it would be sooo easy...

Am I the only one that gets like this???

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Our winters are extremely long. We usually have snow on the ground 5-6 months and it is certainly not uncommon to have many, many days of

-32F (and much colder). Don't even talk about the awful winds! The coldest I have been in was -65F. NOT GOOD. :angry:

With cold weather I am in the kitchen even more than usual. We grill regularly in the summer but not so much in winter. It would be just asking for death. :o

So, I am with you. In summer I find I am more active and in the winter become sluggish at times and my appetite increases sharply this time of the year. I rarely crave sweets but savoury things instead which can be as calorific (if not more). My goal is not to gain a single pound this winter. In fact, since going gluten free I have lost about 25 pounds which is great. I would like to lose 20 more but I am not focusing on the number - just how I feel. It sure has been nice to have to buy lots of new clothes! :D

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I'm in australia so we don't have freezing winters, at least where I live, but this year it pretty much rained all summer (hence all the flooding) so it was pretty cold, for summer at least. Then, if that wasn't enough, it pretty much rained for most of winter.

Rainy days make me crave bad food like KFC nuggets and yummy hot chips.

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Well, I think I'm cured.

Made a giant pot of Italian chicken soup ( chop chop chop), some Chebe focaccia, and a KA chocolate cake with buttercream frosting.

3 hours of chopping, mixing, and washing dishes later I was exhausted...

In the summers here I hate to eat - I'm in the desert SW and 100+ degrees makes my stomach turn if I have to stand in front of the stove and get hotter. Lots of salads and BBQ that time of year. So, "cold" is a relative term to us (anything under 60 - we're wimps!).

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I am in Canberra, Australia so we are unusual for the foreigners assumptions of Australia. Today is early Dec ie Summer and I am wearing a jumper/coat. We are high altitude and subject to the Antartic / South oceans weather pattern.

I'm hungry :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

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I have been eating like a horse lately! Now I'm in the Northeast U.S. (Philadelphia), so I imagine the temperature dropping may have something to do with it. My body may be telling me I need more insulation! :lol:

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