Jump to content



   arrowShare this page:
   

   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

 
Ads by Google:
Celiac.com Sponsor:                                    


Photo
- - - - -

Explaining Celiac To People Without Talking About Poop?


  • Please log in to reply
22 replies to this topic

#16 Skylark

Skylark

    Glutenologist

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,490 posts

Posted 11 December 2011 - 01:51 PM

I find that people are pretty skeptical of my allergies to the point where they do ask what happens if i eat gluten and don't just accept that I'm allergic to it. If it happens I give them the whole explanation to make them as uncomfortable as possible....
I like to think it might help the next person they meet with celiac. :D

Hehee. I've done this too for people who wouldn't take NO for an answer.
  • 0

Celiac.com Sponsor:

#17 colfax

colfax

    New Community Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 11 December 2011 - 09:24 PM

Thanks for your thoughts, everyone. It's really helpful to hear about how other folks deal with this conversation. Maybe I just have really nosy acquaintances, or maybe a lot of my socializing just revolves around food, but thus far every time the gluten-free thing has come up, people have wanted to know more about it. It's usually just in a casually curious sort of way though. I like the food poisoning analogy as a way to answer the question without really answering it.
  • 0

#18 srall

srall

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 528 posts

Posted 12 December 2011 - 05:34 AM

I also have pictures of my rash on my phone, and before and after pics of my 8 year old with her various rashes (hives and white pimply bumps) as well as her deep sunken eyes with black circles, scabs all over her mouth and lips and dried brittle thinning hair (she was 7 at the time). In 2 years I've only had one "friend" who pushed me so hard that I whipped those pictures out. She was very skeptical that I had diagnosed both of us (because the doctors weren't helping) and even though both her doctor and my doctor were completely supportive, my friend just thought I was being overly protective crazy mama.

Most people will accept food allergy, or celiac (people are catching on), or food poisoning symptoms...I like that one. I even say GI problems and nausea...I had so many other symptoms that resolved I could keep someone "entertained" for several minutes. I do agree that if you think something is personal you don't have to talk about it. The one thing I'll say is I have a couple of people who when asking me questions started to look at their own symptoms. One girlfriend is now also gluten free/soy free and dairy free, and another friend is TRYING to be gluten free. It's just such a hard commitment and until you're convinced that the gluten is what is making you sick, there is heavy denial.

Good luck to you. It sounds like you have figured out a good reply. Food poisoning was my favorite also.
  • 0

#19 lovegrov

lovegrov

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,537 posts

Posted 12 December 2011 - 06:22 AM

Tell them about anemia, severe fatigue, and fogginess so bad that you can't function mentally.

richard
  • 0

#20 aeraen

aeraen

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 112 posts

Posted 12 December 2011 - 10:47 AM

It does make me chuckle,sometimes, at how free we all are here in discussing a subject that most would never think to bring up outside this forum :o . Its nice to have a comfortable place to ask questions that we could not ask anywhere else. :)

When I don't want to go into a litany of woes, I simply say that the long-term consequences of gluten intolerance are vast and can, eventually, be deadly. But that the short-term effects of being glutened can be (here, I pause slightly for dramatic effect) "inconvenient". Believe me, EVERYBODY understands what I mean.
  • 1

#21 Haylsinator

Haylsinator

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 62 posts

Posted 13 December 2011 - 02:49 PM

It does make me chuckle,sometimes, at how free we all are here in discussing a subject that most would never think to bring up outside this forum :o . Its nice to have a comfortable place to ask questions that we could not ask anywhere else. :)

When I don't want to go into a litany of woes, I simply say that the long-term consequences of gluten intolerance are vast and can, eventually, be deadly. But that the short-term effects of being glutened can be (here, I pause slightly for dramatic effect) "inconvenient". Believe me, EVERYBODY understands what I mean.


Brilliant! :D Thanks to the OP for asking this, I can't believe it never occurred to me. I think a worry-weight has been lifted off of my chest after reading these responses.
  • 0
Diagnosed with Celiac Disease by blood test: late November 2008

Consciously Gluten Free starting end of November 2008

#22 Chad Sines

Chad Sines

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 279 posts

Posted 14 December 2011 - 08:22 AM

Butt, butt (spelling intended), why would you not want to talk about poop?? Everybody poops. :)

I like the food poisoning explanation. I usually just say upper and lower GI issues. If they probe more, I say that I start out nauseous and it does not end (emphasis added) well.

Ironically, just saying "I have celiac. Eating anything with gluten in it makes me really sick." works 99% of the time except for those who honestly want to know more about it. Many often know friends or family members with it.
  • 1

#23 lynnelise

lynnelise

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 474 posts

Posted 14 December 2011 - 08:38 AM

If pressed I say eating gluten is like giving myself dysentery. They can draw their own conclusions from that. lol
  • 0


0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Celiac.com Sponsors: