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Need Help Settling A Gluten Disagreement


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22 replies to this topic

#16 StephanieL

 
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Posted 23 December 2011 - 06:15 PM

I don't ask "is it okay if it's XYZ/gluten free?" because if I am bringing it, they can eat it or not! If they don't like "vegan/veg/allergy friendly/gluten-free" they'll pass just like if they don't like peas or carrots! Also, because so many people ASSume that these kinds of foods taste bad, it's kind of nice for them not to know and take one, like it and find out AFTER that it's gluten-free!

I agree that if they don't like them the won't ask you to bring them again next year ;)
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#17 Gemini

 
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Posted 23 December 2011 - 08:48 PM

I think that people who have known allergies or intolerances would ask about the offending ingredients before assuming that it ok to eat. For example the gluten rolls I would have brought would have both dairy and eggs. They have buttermilk and are brushed with egg. The only unusual ingredient in either recipe is a small amount of xanthum gum, which is actually in many main stream products. I don't know a single person who has a food allergy or intolerance who doesn't ask about the ingredient they can't have before eating unlabeled foods. Plus these people are were ok after eating the gluten free birthday cake my mother in law bought from a gluten free bakery.

The common call is for packaged goods. Not homemade items. The rolls I'm bringing are all homemade. Plus, I'm not saying that I'm going to lie and say that the rolls I made are gluten rolls.


I wouldn't worry about whether or not anyone else has a food sensitivity because you are right...it would have been brought up or the person with issues would certainly be checking the food ingredients before eating them.
You were asked specifically to bring rolls and you do gluten free ones. I wouldn't tell anyone either because there's no need to......homemade gluten-free rolls taste as good, if not better than the gluten ones. I love not telling people and then wait for their look of surprise when they realize the gluten-free ones are delicious. Why is there always a big issue with people over what's in the rolls? Do people get as uptight when eating ethnic food? I have found that gluten eaters will eat anything and not question what's in them. Most people don't know what's in the food their eating anyway!

Make the gluten-free ones...what a treat! Homemade rolls!
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#18 Googles

 
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Posted 23 December 2011 - 11:08 PM

Just remember to grab your own rolls before people start passing them around and possibly cc'ing them. As soon as they touch food with gluten and then the rolls, you have the potential of cc.

I also agree that you don't have to make an announcement of it. If they ask you can tell them, otherwise go and enjoy. It would be weird (I think) for you to bring (or them to expect) you to bring something you can't eat.
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#19 Juliebove

 
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Posted 23 December 2011 - 11:55 PM

I would bring both. People won't like the gluten-free ones even if you don't tell them. If you do tell them they won't try them. In my mind there is no sense spending more money to make gluten-free stuff for people who don't need them. Just buy the wheat rolls. Nobody will care that you bought them.

Frankly I would be far more worried about the rest of the meal.
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#20 Strawberry_Jam

 
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Posted 24 December 2011 - 04:37 AM

Screw gluten. I wouldn't pay for it. Buying gluteny things just props up the system that keeps us down, yo! :P


if they don't like your gluten-free rolls, they can deal. they can load up on stuffing or whatever else they want to put in their faces.

I think it's cruel to have to bring food you can't eat to an event, boughtten or not.
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gluten-free 25 Feb 2011
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25 yrs old
diagnosed Celiac through biopsy and blood test (WAY positive) as of 25 Feb 2011


#21 Katrala

 
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Posted 24 December 2011 - 04:52 AM

I would bring both. People won't like the gluten-free ones even if you don't tell them. If you do tell them they won't try them. In my mind there is no sense spending more money to make gluten-free stuff for people who don't need them. Just buy the wheat rolls. Nobody will care that you bought them.

Frankly I would be far more worried about the rest of the meal.


I don't necessarily agree that people won't like them even if you say they are gluten-free. There are good gluten-free rolls and then there are gluten-free rolls that pay homage to the stereotype we try to avoid. :)

However, I do think you bring up a good point regarding cost. The cost of making gluten-free rolls for a large group of people can be quite large.

At my family gatherings, most food is homemade, but the rolls are actually one thing that we typically buy.

Is it possible the family asked you to bring rolls because they thought it would be something you could just buy instead of having to make? Maybe they thought they were making it easier on you?
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#22 tarnalberry

 
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Posted 24 December 2011 - 11:17 AM

I'm in the "don't advertise" camp. Not that you shouldn't tell people if they ask what's in them or if they are gluten free or why you are eating them, of course. But you are gluten free and you were asked to bring rolls - it's not an unreasonable assumption that you are going to bring gluten free ones. I would, also, only do this if you can bring gluten free rolls that are suitably good. Maybe they don't have to fool people that they're wheat, but that they are good enough in their own right to eat. (And face it, who hasn't had someone bring something to a dinner that, frankly, isn't that good, regardless of ingredients?)

When I made cookies to hand out as gifts this year, I didn't think twice about giving a whole bunch of non-gluten free people gluten-free cookies. (One was even vegan - gasp!) Everyone *LOVED* them (and I posted a link to the recipes a few days ago ;). ) I did get one friend asking if one of the cookies was gluten free *and* vegan, because he didn't think they could taste quite that amazingly good with so many "modifications" in a recipe. But it was more a confirmation question, like "those are gluten free, aren't they?", than anything else.
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#23 GFinDC

 
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Posted 24 December 2011 - 01:23 PM

Ok, so is your husband not going to tell his family they are gluten-free rolls? Has he been sworn to a code of roll silence? :D

If I was him I'd be spillin' the beans for sure. What if they eat them and then discover they are gluten-free and didn't know it before hand? Good heavens, Christmas dinner ruined by a shocking subterfuge! :D

Just tell them they are gluten-free because you are gluten-free. That way if they have a problem they can bring their own gluteney rolls. They are going to find out you eat gluten-free eventually, and they may even accept that part of your husband's and their son's life. People are actually reasonable sometimes! What will happen next Christmas? Will everyone look at you wondering if you are sneaking gluten-free food into their Christmas dinner? Or will they wonder what wonderful new gluten-free food you will bring that they never had before? Easy way out, tell, reveal, disclose.

Sometimes people put a little cocoa powder in gluten-free baked goods to give them a darker color.

I hope you have a Merry Christmas!
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Proverbs 25:16 "Hast thou found honey? eat so much as is sufficient for thee, lest thou be filled therewith, and vomit it."
Job 30:27 My bowels boiled, and rested not: the days of affliction prevented me.
Thyroid cyst and nodules, Lactose / casein intolerant. Diet positive, gene test pos, symptoms confirmed by Dr-head. My current bad list is: gluten, dairy, sulfites, coffee (the devil's brew), tea, Bug's Bunnies carrots, garbanzo beans of pain, soy- no joy, terrible turnips, tomatoes, peppers, potatoes, and hard work. have a good day! :-) Paul




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