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#1 Elizabeth5220

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Posted 27 December 2011 - 08:27 AM

Question:

If someone is not celiac, or gluten-sensitive or intolerant, and goes off of gluten for a month and then eats gluten and has a reaction, is that indicative of some level of intolerance? Or would a 'normal' person have a reaction just due to the reintroduction of a different type of food?

I am in the process of self-diagnosis...don't have good health insurance nor the income to support co-pays. Two years ago I went gluten-free for about 9 months and then went on vacation and ate gluten...convincing myself I didn't have an issue. After the gluten-filled meal I awoke in the middle of the night with horrible stomach cramps and GI problems. I went gluten-free again for two months and then gave up.

Now I am gluten-free for a month. I think I feel a little better but I'm just not sure. I guess my question is...would a normal person have a reaction after a period of abstinence? Or just someone with intolerance/sensitivity or celiac?
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#2 ravenwoodglass

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Posted 27 December 2011 - 08:35 AM

Question:

If someone is not celiac, or gluten-sensitive or intolerant, and goes off of gluten for a month and then eats gluten and has a reaction, is that indicative of some level of intolerance?


Those who don't have an issue with gluten can stop and start eating it again and again with no problems.
By dropping it and then adding it back in you are doing a challenge. Your having a reaction is indicitive of a problem with gluten and is part of the diagnostic picture.
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Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

#3 Elizabeth5220

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Posted 27 December 2011 - 09:31 AM

Those who don't have an issue with gluten can stop and start eating it again and again with no problems.
By dropping it and then adding it back in you are doing a challenge. Your having a reaction is indicitive of a problem with gluten and is part of the diagnostic picture.

Thank-you! That is what I thought but just wasn't sure!
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