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What Doctors (Don't) Know


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#1 Duhlina

 
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Posted 29 December 2011 - 03:47 AM

I have a friend who is a doctor. He is a primary care doctor - I'd guess he's about 55-60 years old, he's not a GI specialist or anything like that. I was joking with him yesterday that the dog is happy that the treats I gave him for Christmas have wheat in them so he doesn't have to share them with me. My friend read the bag and said "Oh, they are made with barley flour so you can have them" :huh: Seriously?? He is a DOCTOR and he has no clue about Celiac? NONE?! I was really shocked when I heard him say that. It just really hit home that most doctors really have no clue what Celiac is. <sigh>
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#2 Ellie84

 
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Posted 29 December 2011 - 04:39 AM

celiac disease is a relatively new disease, it was discovered shortly after the second world war. Before the nineties it was considered a rare disease and doctors didn't learn much about it. It has become more well-known since the nineties, so the knowledge about it is slowly increasing. It's still poor with most doctors though, so it can be useful to drop off a leaflet with information about celiac disease. The Dutch coeliac association offers these leaflets to patients to show to their doctors.
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27, F, from the beautiful area of Twente in the Netherlands. English is not my first language, so I apologize for any errors.

Symptoms started in 2007, but no link to celiac disease was found until 2009. I learned of celiac disease through the internet, my doctor never recognized it. She put me on a diet before tests were done, so the initial tests failed. My GI advised me to do a gluten provocation, which had to be stopped too soon to take a reliable biopsy. Based on symptoms such as vitamin deficiencies, GI problems and osteopenia my diagnosis now is: glutenintolerant, suspected celiac disease. This diagnosis was in march 2010, and I've been so much better ever since.

#3 frieze

 
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Posted 29 December 2011 - 05:13 AM

celiac disease is a relatively new disease, it was discovered shortly after the second world war. Before the nineties it was considered a rare disease and doctors didn't learn much about it. It has become more well-known since the nineties, so the knowledge about it is slowly increasing. It's still poor with most doctors though, so it can be useful to drop off a leaflet with information about celiac disease. The Dutch coeliac association offers these leaflets to patients to show to their doctors.

http://www.glutenfreehub.com/little-known-facts-about-the-discovery-of-celiac-disease/
first identified in the 1' century AD.
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#4 Aly1

 
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Posted 30 December 2011 - 05:45 AM

Although celiac has been a known disease for quite a long time, it was considered a rare one until relatively recently. I think at this point in time patients have to read read read and educate themselves about the condition - we are not at the point where patients can just rely on their docs for guidance like they might with something like diabetes.

It's even worse if you are gluten intolerant and not celiac - it's only been a little over two years that the EXPERTS acknowledged that this condition is genuine...
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