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Bread Recipe Please


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#1 Chrissyb

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Posted 02 January 2012 - 10:34 AM

I am so excited that I got a Kitchenaid Stand Mixer for Christmas all I want to do is make some bread. Does anybody have an fairly easy recipe for bread. I just want to use the dough hook. I know I am kind of strange.
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#2 pricklypear1971

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Posted 02 January 2012 - 10:38 AM

If you haven't made gluten-free bread before why not start with a mix? I tried KAF, and GFP French, and I think Namaste??

I haven't used the hook on any of them...I have a jet engine Kitchenaid...

I'm going to make a King Cake next weekend. Now THAT will need a hook.
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Apparently there is nothing that cannot happen today. ~ Mark Twain

Probable Endometriosis, in remission from childbirth since 2002.
Hashimoto's DX 2005.
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Genetic tests reveal half DQ2, half DQ8 - I'm a weird bird!

#3 ciamarie

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Posted 02 January 2012 - 07:27 PM

Here's a link to a thread I saved to a gluten-free baking file I created: http://www.celiac.co...-sandwich-bread

It's a long thread with a few variations. I've made the recipe without a stand mixer and discovered I prefer to use less water, so I reduced the water by 1/4 cup. Enjoy!
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#4 sa1937

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Posted 03 January 2012 - 05:12 AM

Chrissy, how wonderful that you got a KitchenAid stand mixer for Christmas! I think Prickly's suggestion of starting with a mix is a good one, which will give you an opportunity to get a feel for gluten-free dough, which is really more like a batter.

I bought my KitchenAid shortly after diagnosis and I have yet to use the dough hook. I find the flat paddle is the one attachment I do use when making gluten-free bread. That said, I am stilling trying to bake that *perfect* loaf of gluten-free bread.
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#5 freeatlast

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Posted 03 January 2012 - 05:32 AM

Here's a link to a thread I saved to a gluten-free baking file I created: http://www.celiac.co...-sandwich-bread

It's a long thread with a few variations. I've made the recipe without a stand mixer and discovered I prefer to use less water, so I reduced the water by 1/4 cup. Enjoy!

Ciamarie, is this what you mean for the recipe? I copied and pasted someone elses's version with 1 t. less xanthan gum and the flour mix in cups. Also went to KA's website and put their blend at the bottom:

Ingredients
* 1 Tbsp. yeast
* 1 Tbsp. sugar
* 1 ½ cups warm water
* 2 ½ cups of King Arthur Gluten-Free Multi-Purpose Flour (decrease by ¼ c.)
* 2 tsp. xanthan gum
* 1 tsp. salt
* 3 large eggs
* 1 ½ Tbsp. oil
* 1 tsp. apple cider vinegar
Directions:

1. Mix yeast, sugar and water in a small bowl. Let it rise for 15-20 minutes. You should have at least 1 ½ inch of foam on top of water.

2. In other, bigger bowl mix all dry ingredients very good (by hand or with spatula).

3. Put eggs, oil and vinegar in a bowl from your stand mixer and mix for 3-4 minutes, until the mixture will be creamy. Shut down the mixer.

4. Add proofed yeast into egg mixture and all dry ingredients. Mix everything on medium for 4-5 minutes. Scrape the sides at least once.

5. Spray a non-stick spray into your bread pan, scoop the dough with the help of spatula into pan and make a loaf. Let it rise for 50-60 minutes. The dough must reach the top of pan.

Bake on 375 for 55-60 minute. After you will take the bread out of oven, cool it down for 20-30 minute before you will slice it. Store in Ziploc bag on the counter in your kitchen. It will be good for 3-4 day. You can freeze it, but I can't tell you how it will taste later because I never did. It's always gone before I can do that.

Tips from our bakers:
•*Make your own blend
Many of our gluten-free recipes use our King Arthur Gluten-Free Multi-Purpose Flour, which includes ingredients that reduce the grittiness sometimes found in gluten-free baked goods. Our flour also increases the shelf life of your treats, keeping them fresh longer.

The following make-at-home blend, featuring stabilized brown rice flour, works pretty well when substituted; and it tastes better than a blend using regular brown rice flour.

Whisk together 6 cups (32 ounces) King Arthur stabilized brown rice flour; 2 cups (10 3/4 ounces) potato starch; and 1 cup (4 ounces) tapioca flour or tapioca starch. Store airtight at room temperature. Note: You can substitute white rice flour for the brown rice flour if you like; it'll make your baked goods grittier (unless you manage to find a finely ground version).
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Proofreader, copy editor, herb gardener and an evolving gluten-free cook.

Had a reaction to wheat, oats, rye, and barley in a lab test done by a homeopathic doctor in 1997. Have been mostly gluten-free since then. Also highly allergic to MSG.

Here's a quote I ran across when researching self-advocacy for children with special needs that I like: "Our subconscious picks up on each positive action we take on our own behalf, lifting the spirit and deepening our self-respect." Kat James

#6 freeatlast

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Posted 03 January 2012 - 07:11 AM

I bought both kinds of yeast in Dec. so I plan to make some yeast bread this week (my first time baking with yeast):

Questions:
Do I need a thermometer for the warm water? If not, how warm should it be? Luke warm, very warm, or what? Where should I put the bread while it is rising? In the oven? If so, what temperature?

Thanks!
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Proofreader, copy editor, herb gardener and an evolving gluten-free cook.

Had a reaction to wheat, oats, rye, and barley in a lab test done by a homeopathic doctor in 1997. Have been mostly gluten-free since then. Also highly allergic to MSG.

Here's a quote I ran across when researching self-advocacy for children with special needs that I like: "Our subconscious picks up on each positive action we take on our own behalf, lifting the spirit and deepening our self-respect." Kat James

#7 ciamarie

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Posted 03 January 2012 - 01:11 PM

The recipe I thought I linked to had flour measurements in tablespoons, I'll copy it below. And I have to admit that my tiny kitchen isn't very warm during the winter, so the dough has taken a while to rise, the 2 or 3 times I've tried it. I'm still pretty new to gluten-free baking. I leave it on the counter, spray a little oil on top and put some plastic wrap on the top of the pan. The oil is so the wrap doesn't stick, or at least doesn't stick much, so you don't need a ton of it. I use one of those misto gadgets with some light olive oil in it for the 'spray'. And although it rises, it has tended to collapse a little in the middle when I bake it, so I have yet to make a perfect loaf of bread. My banana breads come out much better as far as having a good shape (no yeast, etc.). But even my collapsed bread has been edible, it's a work in progress.

As for water temperature, you basically want it luke-warm, it shouldn't feel hot. If it gets too hot, that will kill the yeast, but if it's too cold the yeast won't 'activate'. Below is the recipe from the thread I linked, I think I selected that recipe because it used ingredients I had on hand. Also, I use guar gum instead of xanthan gum, 1/4 teaspoon per cup of flour. When I used more than that, I thought it was too rubbery.

Ingredients:

12 Tbsp. white rice flour
12 Tbsp. brown rice flour
8 Tbsp. potato starch
8 Tbsp. tapioca starch
1 teaspoon salt
1 Tbsp. Xantam gum

3 large eggs
1 ½ Tbsp. of oil
1 tsp. apple cider vinegar
l Tbsp. yeast

1 Tbsp. sugar
1 ½ cup of warm water

Directions:

1. Mix yeast, sugar and water in a small bowl. Let it rise for 15-20 minutes. You should have at least 1 ½ inch of foam on top of water.
2. In other, bigger bowl mix all dry ingredients very good (by hand or with spatula).
3. Put eggs, oil and vinegar in a bowl from your stand mixer and mix for 3-4 minutes, until the mixture will be creamy. Shut down the mixer.
4. Add proofed yeast into egg mixture and all dry ingredients. Mix everything on medium for 4-5 minutes. Scrape the sides at least once.
5. Spray a non-stick spray into your bread pan, scoop the dough with the help of spatula into pan and make a loaf. Let it rise for 50-60 minutes. The dough must reach the top of pan.

Bake on 375 for 55-60 minute. After you will take the bread out of oven, cool it down for 20-30 minute before you will slice it. Store in Ziploc bag on the counter in your kitchen. It will be good for 3-4 day. You can freeze it, but I can't tell you how it will taste later because I never did. It's always gone before I can do that.

This is very close the the blend ratio that KA gives on their website.

(image) shows her qty is 1.5cups white/brown rice flour, 0.5 cup potato starch, 0.5 cup tapioca starch (and King Arthur has same ratio except theirs is 0.25cup tapioca flour or starch)

From same OP on that thread, some tips:
By baking so many breads I found this:

1. You need to use only regular yeast. The rapid yeast would make your bread to rise faster, but the final results wouldn't be so good- bread wouldn't be very high and it will sink 5 minutes after you will take it out from oven.

2. I'm also using extra large eggs in the recipe. I will mix them with mixer for about 5 minutes with oil and apple cider.

3. I will mix the dough with the stand mixer for at least 5 minutes on level 5-6 (medium high).

4. I will put dough into a bread pan and leave outside in the kitchen to rise for l hour. If the kitchen is to cold, I will put the unbaked bread on top of burner of my stove/oven for the last 10 minutes when the oven is heating up to 375F. It will help to pull the dough higher.

5. The bread must reach the top of the bread pan and only then I will put it into oven.

6. I will bake it always for 1 hour. When you will take it out, do not stick a knife in the bread. Use tooth pick, if you need to check. Don't cut the warm bread neither. It will sink right down. Do not open your oven to check the bread. Do not take the bread out of the oven and put it back in. The bread will sink right away. You can check on bread maybe 55 minutes later, but my experience is that it's perfectly done after 1 hour.

This bread will sink up to a half of inch when done.

7. Don't put the warm bread into a plastic bag. The steam will make it to sink much more and the bread will get moldy very fast, or turn sour. I will leave it out for 3-4 hours before I will put it in a plastic bag.

If you think that something will happen to it, it will not.

This bread is good for 3-4 days kept only in a plastic bag. You don't have to put it into fridge, if you will use it in that time. I never did. It's gone by that time.
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#8 pricklypear1971

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Posted 03 January 2012 - 02:03 PM

When I add liquid to yeast I make it a bit warmer than my finger. Not hot, just warmer.

I also rise my bread in the oven, I usually turn the oven on for 2-3 minutes, turn it off and turn the light on. I also put a pan of hot water in there on a bottom rack. But I live in AZ with zero humidity...

The oven stays warm and calm, and works well for me. Again, don't get it hot. Like a warm summer day.

I cover most with Saran wrap. I find a bit of oil on the wrap is important with gluten-free bread since its delicate and you only have one rise.
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Apparently there is nothing that cannot happen today. ~ Mark Twain

Probable Endometriosis, in remission from childbirth since 2002.
Hashimoto's DX 2005.
Gluten-Free since 6/2011.
DH (and therefore Celiac) dx from ND
.
Responsive to iodine withdrawal for DH (see quote, above).

Genetic tests reveal half DQ2, half DQ8 - I'm a weird bird!

#9 beebs

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Posted 03 January 2012 - 02:08 PM

Do you like Irish Soda bread - if so this is the bomb, it is the best bread I have ever had - I can't eat most of the gluten-free bread because they are disgusto!

I use half the sugar in the recipe

Gluten-free buckwheat bread



Photography by John Paul Urizar


There’s no need to miss out the joys of delicious bread with this gluten-free buckwheat bread recipe. See notes section for Low FODMAP diet tip.

Ingredients (serves 8)
1 1/2 cups gluten-free plain flour
1/2 cup buckwheat flour
3 teaspoons gluten-free baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons caster sugar
2 eggwhites
1 cup reduced-fat milk
1/2 cup vegetable oil
2 tablespoons seed mix with pine nuts

Method
Preheat oven to 180°C/160°C fan-forced. Grease a 6cm-deep, 9cm x 19cm (base) loaf pan.
Sift flours, baking powder and salt into a large bowl. Stir in sugar. Using an electric mixer, lightly beat eggwhites until just frothy. Stir in milk and oil. Add eggwhite mixture to flour mixture. Beat for 2 to 3 minutes or until smooth.
Pour mixture into prepared pan. Smooth top with a spatula. Press seed mix lightly into mixture. Bake for 55 minutes to 1 hour or until a skewer inserted in the centre of bread comes out clean. Stand in pan for 10 minutes. Turn out onto a wire rack to cool.
Notes
You could serve this loaf very thinly sliced for mini open sandwiches or lightly toasted and spread with jam or honey. You could replace seed mix with pepitas, sunflower seeds or sesame seeds.

Low FODMAP diet tip: If you are lactose intolerant, the amount of milk used in this recipe is suitable for most people, however you can replace with lactose free milk if you wish.
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#10 Mizzo

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Posted 06 January 2012 - 04:44 AM

Another rising trick is to heat water in a microwave for about 2-3 minutes (should boil rapid). Open the door ,take out water and put in the plastic wrapped covered bread dough, shut door quickly and let sit. The moist heat from the Microwave lasts a while surprisingly.
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#11 Bubba's Mom

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Posted 06 January 2012 - 08:39 AM

I know you've asked for bread recipes..but most gluten-free bread is more like a batter and don't need the hook.
I understand your wanting to play with all the gadgets on your new Kitchenaid. They're fun! Why not use that dough hook to mix up a meatloaf..or meatballs? You can use gluten-free bread crumbs or smashed up Rice Chex for the filler. :D
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#12 freeatlast

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Posted 06 January 2012 - 05:14 PM

Another rising trick is to heat water in a microwave for about 2-3 minutes (should boil rapid). Open the door ,take out water and put in the plastic wrapped covered bread dough, shut door quickly and let sit. The moist heat from the Microwave lasts a while surprisingly.

Thanks, Mizzo. That sounds really easy!
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Proofreader, copy editor, herb gardener and an evolving gluten-free cook.

Had a reaction to wheat, oats, rye, and barley in a lab test done by a homeopathic doctor in 1997. Have been mostly gluten-free since then. Also highly allergic to MSG.

Here's a quote I ran across when researching self-advocacy for children with special needs that I like: "Our subconscious picks up on each positive action we take on our own behalf, lifting the spirit and deepening our self-respect." Kat James

#13 freeatlast

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Posted 06 January 2012 - 05:16 PM

When I add liquid to yeast I make it a bit warmer than my finger. Not hot, just warmer.

I also rise my bread in the oven, I usually turn the oven on for 2-3 minutes, turn it off and turn the light on. I also put a pan of hot water in there on a bottom rack. But I live in AZ with zero humidity...

The oven stays warm and calm, and works well for me. Again, don't get it hot. Like a warm summer day.

I cover most with Saran wrap. I find a bit of oil on the wrap is important with gluten-free bread since its delicate and you only have one rise.

What kind of oil? Do you have the oil face down on dough?
  • 0
Proofreader, copy editor, herb gardener and an evolving gluten-free cook.

Had a reaction to wheat, oats, rye, and barley in a lab test done by a homeopathic doctor in 1997. Have been mostly gluten-free since then. Also highly allergic to MSG.

Here's a quote I ran across when researching self-advocacy for children with special needs that I like: "Our subconscious picks up on each positive action we take on our own behalf, lifting the spirit and deepening our self-respect." Kat James

#14 freeatlast

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Posted 06 January 2012 - 05:22 PM

Do you like Irish Soda bread - if so this is the bomb, it is the best bread I have ever had - I can't eat most of the gluten-free bread because they are disgusto!

I use half the sugar in the recipe

Gluten-free buckwheat bread



Photography by John Paul Urizar


There’s no need to miss out the joys of delicious bread with this gluten-free buckwheat bread recipe. See notes section for Low FODMAP diet tip.

Ingredients (serves 8)
1 1/2 cups gluten-free plain flour
1/2 cup buckwheat flour
3 teaspoons gluten-free baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons caster sugar
2 eggwhites
1 cup reduced-fat milk
1/2 cup vegetable oil
2 tablespoons seed mix with pine nuts

Method
Preheat oven to 180°C/160°C fan-forced. Grease a 6cm-deep, 9cm x 19cm (base) loaf pan.
Sift flours, baking powder and salt into a large bowl. Stir in sugar. Using an electric mixer, lightly beat eggwhites until just frothy. Stir in milk and oil. Add eggwhite mixture to flour mixture. Beat for 2 to 3 minutes or until smooth.
Pour mixture into prepared pan. Smooth top with a spatula. Press seed mix lightly into mixture. Bake for 55 minutes to 1 hour or until a skewer inserted in the centre of bread comes out clean. Stand in pan for 10 minutes. Turn out onto a wire rack to cool.
Notes
You could serve this loaf very thinly sliced for mini open sandwiches or lightly toasted and spread with jam or honey. You could replace seed mix with pepitas, sunflower seeds or sesame seeds.

Low FODMAP diet tip: If you are lactose intolerant, the amount of milk used in this recipe is suitable for most people, however you can replace with lactose free milk if you wish.

What kind of flour do you use for the gluten free plain flour and how much of each kind? Also, there is no xantham gum in it. Does it rise ok? Finally, what is caster sugar. Thanks for your help on this recipe.
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Proofreader, copy editor, herb gardener and an evolving gluten-free cook.

Had a reaction to wheat, oats, rye, and barley in a lab test done by a homeopathic doctor in 1997. Have been mostly gluten-free since then. Also highly allergic to MSG.

Here's a quote I ran across when researching self-advocacy for children with special needs that I like: "Our subconscious picks up on each positive action we take on our own behalf, lifting the spirit and deepening our self-respect." Kat James

#15 pricklypear1971

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Posted 06 January 2012 - 05:38 PM

Gluteny breads would say roll it in oil (oil in a big bowl, roll the ball of dough around in it).

Since gluten-free breads usually go in the pan, rise once, then bake - id just put a light layer of oil over the top surface where the wrap will hit. The goal is to create a seal, and stop the wrap from sticking. You can use any neutral oil - safflower, etc.


Btw, caster sugar is "baker's sugar". It's finely ground so it dissolves quickly. Its NOT powdered sugar. If you can't find it just use regular granulated sugar.
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Apparently there is nothing that cannot happen today. ~ Mark Twain

Probable Endometriosis, in remission from childbirth since 2002.
Hashimoto's DX 2005.
Gluten-Free since 6/2011.
DH (and therefore Celiac) dx from ND
.
Responsive to iodine withdrawal for DH (see quote, above).

Genetic tests reveal half DQ2, half DQ8 - I'm a weird bird!


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