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Bread Recipe Please
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I am so excited that I got a Kitchenaid Stand Mixer for Christmas all I want to do is make some bread. Does anybody have an fairly easy recipe for bread. I just want to use the dough hook. I know I am kind of strange.

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If you haven't made gluten-free bread before why not start with a mix? I tried KAF, and GFP French, and I think Namaste??

I haven't used the hook on any of them...I have a jet engine Kitchenaid...

I'm going to make a King Cake next weekend. Now THAT will need a hook.

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Here's a link to a thread I saved to a gluten-free baking file I created:

It's a long thread with a few variations. I've made the recipe without a stand mixer and discovered I prefer to use less water, so I reduced the water by 1/4 cup. Enjoy!

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Chrissy, how wonderful that you got a KitchenAid stand mixer for Christmas! I think Prickly's suggestion of starting with a mix is a good one, which will give you an opportunity to get a feel for gluten-free dough, which is really more like a batter.

I bought my KitchenAid shortly after diagnosis and I have yet to use the dough hook. I find the flat paddle is the one attachment I do use when making gluten-free bread. That said, I am stilling trying to bake that *perfect* loaf of gluten-free bread.

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Here's a link to a thread I saved to a gluten-free baking file I created:

It's a long thread with a few variations. I've made the recipe without a stand mixer and discovered I prefer to use less water, so I reduced the water by 1/4 cup. Enjoy!

Ciamarie, is this what you mean for the recipe? I copied and pasted someone elses's version with 1 t. less xanthan gum and the flour mix in cups. Also went to KA's website and put their blend at the bottom:

Ingredients

* 1 Tbsp. yeast

* 1 Tbsp. sugar

* 1 ½ cups warm water

* 2 ½ cups of King Arthur Gluten-Free Multi-Purpose Flour (decrease by ¼ c.)

* 2 tsp. xanthan gum

* 1 tsp. salt

* 3 large eggs

* 1 ½ Tbsp. oil

* 1 tsp. apple cider vinegar

Directions:

1. Mix yeast, sugar and water in a small bowl. Let it rise for 15-20 minutes. You should have at least 1 ½ inch of foam on top of water.

2. In other, bigger bowl mix all dry ingredients very good (by hand or with spatula).

3. Put eggs, oil and vinegar in a bowl from your stand mixer and mix for 3-4 minutes, until the mixture will be creamy. Shut down the mixer.

4. Add proofed yeast into egg mixture and all dry ingredients. Mix everything on medium for 4-5 minutes. Scrape the sides at least once.

5. Spray a non-stick spray into your bread pan, scoop the dough with the help of spatula into pan and make a loaf. Let it rise for 50-60 minutes. The dough must reach the top of pan.

Bake on 375 for 55-60 minute. After you will take the bread out of oven, cool it down for 20-30 minute before you will slice it. Store in Ziploc bag on the counter in your kitchen. It will be good for 3-4 day. You can freeze it, but I can't tell you how it will taste later because I never did. It's always gone before I can do that.

Tips from our bakers:

*Make your own blend

Many of our gluten-free recipes use our King Arthur Gluten-Free Multi-Purpose Flour, which includes ingredients that reduce the grittiness sometimes found in gluten-free baked goods. Our flour also increases the shelf life of your treats, keeping them fresh longer.

The following make-at-home blend, featuring stabilized brown rice flour, works pretty well when substituted; and it tastes better than a blend using regular brown rice flour.

Whisk together 6 cups (32 ounces) King Arthur stabilized brown rice flour; 2 cups (10 3/4 ounces) potato starch; and 1 cup (4 ounces) tapioca flour or tapioca starch. Store airtight at room temperature. Note: You can substitute white rice flour for the brown rice flour if you like; it'll make your baked goods grittier (unless you manage to find a finely ground version).

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I bought both kinds of yeast in Dec. so I plan to make some yeast bread this week (my first time baking with yeast):

Questions:

Do I need a thermometer for the warm water? If not, how warm should it be? Luke warm, very warm, or what? Where should I put the bread while it is rising? In the oven? If so, what temperature?

Thanks!

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The recipe I thought I linked to had flour measurements in tablespoons, I'll copy it below. And I have to admit that my tiny kitchen isn't very warm during the winter, so the dough has taken a while to rise, the 2 or 3 times I've tried it. I'm still pretty new to gluten-free baking. I leave it on the counter, spray a little oil on top and put some plastic wrap on the top of the pan. The oil is so the wrap doesn't stick, or at least doesn't stick much, so you don't need a ton of it. I use one of those misto gadgets with some light olive oil in it for the 'spray'. And although it rises, it has tended to collapse a little in the middle when I bake it, so I have yet to make a perfect loaf of bread. My banana breads come out much better as far as having a good shape (no yeast, etc.). But even my collapsed bread has been edible, it's a work in progress.

As for water temperature, you basically want it luke-warm, it shouldn't feel hot. If it gets too hot, that will kill the yeast, but if it's too cold the yeast won't 'activate'. Below is the recipe from the thread I linked, I think I selected that recipe because it used ingredients I had on hand. Also, I use guar gum instead of xanthan gum, 1/4 teaspoon per cup of flour. When I used more than that, I thought it was too rubbery.

Ingredients:

12 Tbsp. white rice flour

12 Tbsp. brown rice flour

8 Tbsp. potato starch

8 Tbsp. tapioca starch

1 teaspoon salt

1 Tbsp. Xantam gum

3 large eggs

1

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When I add liquid to yeast I make it a bit warmer than my finger. Not hot, just warmer.

I also rise my bread in the oven, I usually turn the oven on for 2-3 minutes, turn it off and turn the light on. I also put a pan of hot water in there on a bottom rack. But I live in AZ with zero humidity...

The oven stays warm and calm, and works well for me. Again, don't get it hot. Like a warm summer day.

I cover most with Saran wrap. I find a bit of oil on the wrap is important with gluten-free bread since its delicate and you only have one rise.

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Do you like Irish Soda bread - if so this is the bomb, it is the best bread I have ever had - I can't eat most of the gluten-free bread because they are disgusto!

I use half the sugar in the recipe

Gluten-free buckwheat bread

Photography by John Paul Urizar

There

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Another rising trick is to heat water in a microwave for about 2-3 minutes (should boil rapid). Open the door ,take out water and put in the plastic wrapped covered bread dough, shut door quickly and let sit. The moist heat from the Microwave lasts a while surprisingly.

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I know you've asked for bread recipes..but most gluten-free bread is more like a batter and don't need the hook.

I understand your wanting to play with all the gadgets on your new Kitchenaid. They're fun! Why not use that dough hook to mix up a meatloaf..or meatballs? You can use gluten-free bread crumbs or smashed up Rice Chex for the filler. :D

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Another rising trick is to heat water in a microwave for about 2-3 minutes (should boil rapid). Open the door ,take out water and put in the plastic wrapped covered bread dough, shut door quickly and let sit. The moist heat from the Microwave lasts a while surprisingly.

Thanks, Mizzo. That sounds really easy!

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When I add liquid to yeast I make it a bit warmer than my finger. Not hot, just warmer.

I also rise my bread in the oven, I usually turn the oven on for 2-3 minutes, turn it off and turn the light on. I also put a pan of hot water in there on a bottom rack. But I live in AZ with zero humidity...

The oven stays warm and calm, and works well for me. Again, don't get it hot. Like a warm summer day.

I cover most with Saran wrap. I find a bit of oil on the wrap is important with gluten-free bread since its delicate and you only have one rise.

What kind of oil? Do you have the oil face down on dough?

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Do you like Irish Soda bread - if so this is the bomb, it is the best bread I have ever had - I can't eat most of the gluten-free bread because they are disgusto!

I use half the sugar in the recipe

Gluten-free buckwheat bread

Photography by John Paul Urizar

There

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Gluteny breads would say roll it in oil (oil in a big bowl, roll the ball of dough around in it).

Since gluten-free breads usually go in the pan, rise once, then bake - id just put a light layer of oil over the top surface where the wrap will hit. The goal is to create a seal, and stop the wrap from sticking. You can use any neutral oil - safflower, etc.

Btw, caster sugar is "baker's sugar". It's finely ground so it dissolves quickly. Its NOT powdered sugar. If you can't find it just use regular granulated sugar.

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What kind of flour do you use for the gluten free plain flour and how much of each kind? Also, there is no xantham gum in it. Does it rise ok? Finally, what is caster sugar. Thanks for your help on this recipe.

Hi Freeatlast - have you ever had Irish soda bread? Its that kind of texture - so not so much a sandwhich type bread (although I do use it for that) more of a get it out of the over and butter it and enjoy with a cuppa tea kind of bread. Seriously though - i am a very unwilling gluten free person- I have not found one bread on the market that I like, I seriously despise it all, but I love this one. The baking soda helps it rise - although I tend to add a little bit more than it says so it rises more. Our brands are probably different - but I have used both Orgran and white wings- I am sure it'll work with any that you find. Do forget to add the seeds- it gives it that lovely texture -mmmm.

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Caster sugar is also known as superfine sugar. :)

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Hi Freeatlast - have you ever had Irish soda bread? Its that kind of texture - so not so much a sandwhich type bread (although I do use it for that) more of a get it out of the over and butter it and enjoy with a cuppa tea kind of bread. Seriously though - i am a very unwilling gluten free person- I have not found one bread on the market that I like, I seriously despise it all, but I love this one. The baking soda helps it rise - although I tend to add a little bit more than it says so it rises more. Our brands are probably different - but I have used both Orgran and white wings- I am sure it'll work with any that you find. Do forget to add the seeds- it gives it that lovely texture -mmmm.

I don't know how to find super fine sugar in the US. Maybe someone can help me with this, also.

In addition, which flours did you use for the plain flour and how much of each did you use? Thanks! I have tried really hard to find a good bread recipe and I don't have a Kitchen Aid. Could I use a regular mixer for this recipe?

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I bought a bread machine with a gluten free setting, I just chuck the whole lot in that.

Do you get Orgran flour there?

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I bought a bread machine with a gluten free setting, I just chuck the whole lot in that.

Do you get Orgran flour there?

No, haven't seen it anywhere. Does it have potato starch and tapioca flour in the mixture? Just wondering how much starch to put in. Thanks!

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Oh goodness - I have no idea how to make my own flour! Sorry! I just use pre bought stuff. Do you have a good brand there? Not sure about the sugar - but did want to say that I've mixed this recipe by and and it still turns out great.

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I don't know how to find super fine sugar in the US. Maybe someone can help me with this, also.

In addition, which flours did you use for the plain flour and how much of each did you use? Thanks! I have tried really hard to find a good bread recipe and I don't have a Kitchen Aid. Could I use a regular mixer for this recipe?

If you cannot find superfine sugar, just stick granulated sugar into your blender or food processor and process until it is very fine. It is far cheaper than buying it! :P

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Oh goodness - I have no idea how to make my own flour! Sorry! I just use pre bought stuff. Do you have a good brand there? Not sure about the sugar - but did want to say that I've mixed this recipe by and and it still turns out great.

Ok. Thanks!!!!

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Hi my name is pat just found this web site, i have a bread recipe that is quite good tastes ok

I do not have a machine I make mine by hand, I use orgran self raising flour and brown rice flour

and white rice flour, also wards baking flour, 3 eggs, one cup of soya milk, one cup of water

if needed, 2 desserts spoons of nettelex marge.

have two bowls ready, have bread container ready, place all dry ingredients in to larger bowl,and

mix leave for a while, get other bowl for wet ingredients, place eggs in bowl one at a time,mix

then add marge, then add milk and mix, add half the water, add wet to dry not all at once small amount

at a time till all mixed, if needed use extra water, if mix looks ok without extra water, fine

place mix in to bread container and put in preheated oven on 180 degress.

cook for 20 to 30 minutes, check after 25 see if is cooked if not leave for 5 mins more, when cooked

take out of oven, leave on side covered with a clean teatowel, til cold then cut up

and have some, any left over can be frozan in to separte bags. enjoy. :)

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If you cannot find superfine sugar, just stick granulated sugar into your blender or food processor and process until it is very fine. It is far cheaper than buying it! :P

Thank you! I will try that.

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