Get email alerts Get Celiac.com E-mail Alerts  




Celiac.com Sponsor:
Celiac.com Sponsor:




Ads by Google:






   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

2 Questions: Oats And Rice?
0

14 posts in this topic

How long after being gluten-free can you try gluten-free oats again safely? I know they were a problem for me when going gluten-free, but I do miss oatmeal, I was hoping I could try them again in the near future. I am at 2 months gluten free, with 2 glutened incidents.

Also, do I need to buy rice thats gluten free, or is it 'safe' to assume all rice is gluten free? I have gone with the safety of only buying gluten free labeled rice, but I am wondering if I am being overly cautious.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:

I always get sick when I eat oats, no matter what. So I don't eat them at all. Try cream of rice, it's good. :)

Personally, I wouldn't risk oats so soon.

I don't buy gluten free rice, but I buy it in bulk at an Asian market and it comes from a rice only facility and is unprocessed. I don't know if there's a risk ordinarily. It might be good to look at what other things were made in the same facility.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most of the medical articles I've read say to introduce oats only when you are fully recovered and antibodies gone, or after six months gluten-free, whichever is longer. They also say that you should have followup blood testing after six months eating oats (assuming you had a positive blood test to begin with).

I don't worry about rice, other than to give it a good rinse. I never buy from bulk bins, but I do buy normal grocery store or oriental market rice. Lundburg grows really nice organic, certified gluten-free rice if you are really concerned.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How long after being gluten-free can you try gluten-free oats again safely? I know they were a problem for me when going gluten-free, but I do miss oatmeal, I was hoping I could try them again in the near future. I am at 2 months gluten free, with 2 glutened incidents.

Also, do I need to buy rice thats gluten free, or is it 'safe' to assume all rice is gluten free? I have gone with the safety of only buying gluten free labeled rice, but I am wondering if I am being overly cautious.

To be honest with you, I was diagnosed with Celiac and then went home to get well. I did not involve doctors after the diagnosis because I don't like or trust them. They did such a crappy job diagnosing me, I wasn't going to trust them with getting me well.

I did not read anything about oatmeal and waiting to heal before trying it. I always ate a lot of oatmeal because I am a hiker and it's good fuel and keeps you full. I bought some certified gluten-free oats and started eating them about 2 months after I was diagnosed. Never had a single problem and felt great after eating them. I should add I was deathly ill at time of diagnosis and couldn't eat much of anything. It may be because I was used to the amount of fiber in them and they didn't bother me that way or I didn't expect a reaction. Sometimes when you re-introduce foods, that can create a lot of anxiety in some people and that can upset your stomach. People are different but if you like oats and ate a lot of them before diagnosis, then there is no reason to wait so long. If you feel well then try a small amount and if you have a problem, put them back on the shelf and wait longer. 2 months may be long enough for you to tolerate them well but you will never know until you give it a shot. The advice you see that says wait a year is an average and some people can re-introduce oats much sooner, while others cannot. I use Gifts of Nature certified gluten-free oats and they are delicious!

I do not require a company to label their product gluten-free with regards to rice but check to see if they manufacture other heavily gluteny things. I wouldn't eat packaged rice mixes unless they are clearly labeled gluten-free but many people use Asian markets as a source for their rice without any issues. Many companies will not mark their rice as gluten free, even when it is, because rice is naturally gluten free.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you are going to try gluten free oats add it back in slowly. It is suggested serving sizes on some of the gluten free bags of oats. About 3 Tablespoons (or under)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites




I didn't try gluten free oats until more than a year after going gluten free. Two reasons, I couldn't find any certified gluten-free oats anywhere, and they're way too high in net carbs for my liking! Now I eat them only on occasion, and usually only when I'm baking something for Grove feasts, when I can't use nut flours due to other members who have severe allergies.

I avoid rice also, due to net carb content. It's just filler, with no real nutritive value IMO.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I didn't try gluten free oats until more than a year after going gluten free. Two reasons, I couldn't find any certified gluten-free oats anywhere, and they're way too high in net carbs for my liking! Now I eat them only on occasion, and usually only when I'm baking something for Grove feasts, when I can't use nut flours due to other members who have severe allergies.

I avoid rice also, due to net carb content. It's just filler, with no real nutritive value IMO.

Oatmeal and brown rice are a good source of fiber and nutrients and are not the type of carbs to worry about, unless you are a diabetic. I can see your point about white rice being a filler with no nutritive value but not the case with the others. They are a good addition to most people's diets, unless you have a medical problem which would prohibit consumption. All carbs are not created equal and there is just too much fear of them out there.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One important thing to note about oats is that just because you feel okay when you eat them doesn't mean it is definitely not harming your intestines. I think it would be a good idea to get your villi and/or blood checked after eating oats to make sure everything is doing okay.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One important thing to note about oats is that just because you feel okay when you eat them doesn't mean it is definitely not harming your intestines. I think it would be a good idea to get your villi and/or blood checked after eating oats to make sure everything is doing okay.

That is a good point, without doubt, but I have my blood work regularly checked and it's always fantastic. Plus, if oats were damaging your intestines, over time you would start to notice symptoms or just be "off". Since going gluten-free 7 years ago, I have had zero stomach issues, except for the rare glutening.

Gastro symptoms were the number one symptom for me and the pain was excruciating.

Oats really are safe for many Celiacs. I know quite a few who eat oats without any problems but they were oat eaters long before diagnosis. The medical profession likes to scare people without making the actual facts readily available. Not everyone can tolerate them but many can and they shouldn't be scared into omitting them from their diet. It should always be certified oats but they are easy to find nowadays. Expensive, but easy to find.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oats really are safe for many Celiacs. I know quite a few who eat oats without any problems but they were oat eaters long before diagnosis. The medical profession likes to scare people without making the actual facts readily available. Not everyone can tolerate them but many can and they shouldn't be scared into omitting them from their diet. It should always be certified oats but they are easy to find nowadays. Expensive, but easy to find.

The facts are readily available. Most celiacs tolerate oats, but a few celiacs have gotten villous atrophy in studies with very clean oats. The oat reaction is common enough that it's been documented in studies, and common enough that we have folks on the board who can't eat them. It makes sense to try because oats are a lovely grain, but also to use reasonable care.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The facts are readily available. Most celiacs tolerate oats, but a few celiacs have gotten villous atrophy in studies with very clean oats. The oat reaction is common enough that it's been documented in studies, and common enough that we have folks on the board who can't eat them. It makes sense to try because oats are a lovely grain, but also to use reasonable care.

I'm sure a few Celiacs have had villous atrophy from eating oats but I am pretty sure it is in the minority, otherwise oats would be excluded from the diet by most Celiac organizations. I think I made a point of saying you should include this grain in your diet but go slowly and stop if you have any problems with it. If I am feeling well after many times of ingesting oats, I call that a success and don't worry about any ill effects. I just can't be that paranoid about it.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm sure a few Celiacs have had villous atrophy from eating oats but I am pretty sure it is in the minority, otherwise oats would be excluded from the diet by most Celiac organizations. I think I made a point of saying you should include this grain in your diet but go slowly and stop if you have any problems with it. If I am feeling well after many times of ingesting oats, I call that a success and don't worry about any ill effects. I just can't be that paranoid about it.

Why do you keep using words like "scare" and "paranoid"? I don't understand why you are attacking me. The facts are very straightforward, that oats act as gluten in some celiacs.

Since you apparently haven't read it, here's the CSA recommendation (which is very close to my original answer since both are based on the biomedical literature).

http://www.csaceliacs.info/guide_to_oats.jsp

"Oats appear to be suitable for some people with celiac disease, but not all. Thus oats are not yet a risk free choice for all people with celiac disease. If choosing to include oats, limit risk by choosing specially handled, uncontaminated oats and consuming no more than 50 g/day. Most physicians advise people, newly diagnosed with celiac disease, to wait until their health is restored before ingesting oats. Waiting one year to introduce uncontaminated oats in the diet is commonly suggested to increase a successful introduction.

The appropriateness of oats in the gluten-free diet has been pondered for over 20 years. Studies continue with mixed results on this subject. Some studies have conclusions that do not match the data collected for that study. Today, there is no way to predict ahead of time, which celiacs will or will not be able to successfully consume oats.

Until there is clarity in the research, oats is not a risk free choice for those on a gluten-free diet. As always, each individual is responsible for managing the inevitable risks related to living gluten-free. Each person develops a personal criteria for making decisions that will achieve their optimum health and well-being. For some people that means oats and others are oats free."

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You've got good advice on how to reintroduce oats. I am very envious of those who can eat them and wish I could. Good luck on reintroducing them..

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oatmeal and brown rice are a good source of fiber and nutrients and are not the type of carbs to worry about, unless you are a diabetic. I can see your point about white rice being a filler with no nutritive value but not the case with the others. They are a good addition to most people's diets, unless you have a medical problem which would prohibit consumption. All carbs are not created equal and there is just too much fear of them out there.

absolutely, not all carbs are created equal. However, grains, whether oats or rice, are still going to raise your blood glucose levels considerably, and whether or not you're diabetic, this is NOT a good thing. One serving of oats 103.38 grams of carbohydrates with only 16.5 grams of fiber for a net carb impact of 86.88 (or if you prefer the Glycemic Index rating, it's 54, compare it with Betty Crocker vanilla cake at only 42! (source - Harvard medical school))

I prefer to get my carbs and fiber from vegetables that are not also going to give me blood glucose spikes and crashes. And no, I am not diabetic, and I plan to keep it that way! I firmly believe that everybody could benefit from less grains, more veggies.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      104,357
    • Total Posts
      920,529
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • The doctors just made me feel like I was crazy because they did not have a clue of what was wrong with me. I did a stool test (positive) and I did a genes test (positive for two gluten sensitive genes, one in each chromosome).  Blood test are not so foolproof, if you read the comments/experiences in such topic you will see the problems. Biopsy can give a false negative if taken from an undamaged area. If you have medical problems that go away once on a gluten free diet then gluten is the problem. The medical establishment profit from managing your medical problems and big pharma makes money by pushing pills so we need to be careful because they won't benefit if a gluten-free diet solve your problems. Since I started a Gluten free diet I have been free of the following: (all related to Celiac)  Irregularity, Intestinal noise, Irregular stool, Tooth enamel defects, Rash in upper arms, Abdominal swelling, depression, fatigue, irritability, lactose intolerance, 
      loss of memory, dandruff, uncontrollable bladder, suicidal thoughts, unable to sleep, Canker sores/ Mouth ulcers, high blood pressure, and probably others that I did not realize. I was at the end of my rope, thanks to Google and the people that are able to talk about this I was able to get my life back. I am passionate about this because I know how bad its can get. 
    • Well, I have never cruised on Carnival, but I am sure they can accommodate you.  I assume that you have already alerted them that you require gluten free meals.  If not, please contact Carnival immediately. Here are my own tips.  Some folks eat off the buffet line, but not me or hubby except for coffee/drinks and baked potatoes (jacketed) and fruit that we wash in the restroom (people touch everything!)  Okay, I am OCD, but my last glutening which occurred the previous summer made me sick for three months (GI tested my antibodies to prove it).   When we board, I go to the buffet restaurant ASAP and ask to speak to the Head Waiter (they are usually there greeting customers and often trying to up sell to specialty restaurants.   Let them know you have celiac disease and must be gluten free.  They may try to tell you that each dish is clearly marked gluten free, but really?  Who's to say that some other passenger is not going to switch spoons (or I have seen passengers wandering around with serving spoons...I kid you not!  The staff usually will  go downstairs and fetch a gluten free meal for me from the main dining room's kitchen as there is usually a dedicated area for allergies.  We have to wait up to 20 minutes or so but it is worth it.  Starving?  Get a baked potato wrapped in foil until your gluten-free meal arrives.  Now, do not do this every single time.  Those folks have to go down several levels to fetch food and you don't want to be a pain.  But if the main dining area is closed, they need to make an effort to keep you safe.  On our last cruise, we were advised not to eat anywhere but the main dining room and that included room service (they are not trained to handled allergies).  My headwaiters have sent goodies (prepackaged gluten free rolls and cookies for us to keep in our room.  We can always grab whole fruit (I wash it first) to snack on.  I bring gluten-free non-perishable items with me to eat while at port in case we can't find anything (which can be often).  Again, when we get back to our ship, we contact our headwaiter and he/she can prepare some snacks until we have dinner.   Be grateful and not picky.   We eat all meals in the dining room (or at least as much as possible).  Our headwaiter had a few other celiacs on our cruise this summer, so they prepared some gluten-free waffles, etc. for our breakfast!  What a treat!  At breakfast, we'd have different waiters, so our headwaiter would always instruct our waiters each and every time!  They even let me tour the kitchen and showed me the allergy section.   The only time I did not feel safe was at the buffet.  We once ordered gluten-free pizza and I realized (I watched) that that restaurant didn't really have the gluten-free thing down), do I called him on it.  Got the manager etc.  So, be careful.  Other cruises made us frozen Udi"s which was just fine with us.  They covered it up in foil so that we would not get any cross contamination from their pizza oven. So, have fun!   Tipping?  We prepaid our gratuities, but we gave our headwaiter an extra $200.00 for his time.  For us, it was well worth the service and safety of our food.  It does not hurt to slip some of the tip ahead of time (like after your first meal!)  
    • <strong>Celiac Disease & Gluten-free Diet Information at Celiac.com. Gluten Free Diabetes ::The 3 Step Trick that Reverses Diabetes Permanently in ... View the full article
    • I had a biopsy done (2 samples, 1 on a lesion and 1 next to lesions), and also more bloodwork done. All came back negative. However, I only had been eating gluten for 2 weeks prior, and it took a week of gluten for lesions to reappear. I also used a topical steroid off and on (1x a week approximately) for a month or so before testing. The dermatologist told me to stay off gluten though, and said she wants to do more allergy testing (her next open testing appt is in 6 months!!). I know I'm not the DR, but I dont think it's allergies...without a doubt, my skin begins clearing about 2 weeks post gluten-free diet...this is without changing anything else in my lifestyle. And when i had to go back on gluten before my biopsy, it took about a week, but did reappear. Now, about 2 weeks post biopsy and gluten-free, it had begun clearing until i worked outside all day in heat, humidity,  sweat etc and it has definitely irritated all the places that were healing (not new breakouts, just aggravating what was going away!). All that being said, i have a friend who is an MD( who's hobby is to attend conferences on skin conditions!), and she has told me that without a doubt, I have celiac/DH.  I think I just feel like I need test results and paperwork to show for it...especially to show family members who are unsupportive (gross understatement!) of the extreme changes I've had to make!
    • Sorry ! I have never cruised before.  Just wanting to follow your topic.  Good luck! Have a great,  safe vacation.  
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Entries

  • Recent Status Updates

  • Who's Online (See full list)

  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      61,432
    • Most Online
      1,763

    Newest Member
    rbeckler60
    Joined