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How To Use Frozen Bread


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11 replies to this topic

#1 1974girl

 
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Posted 10 January 2012 - 09:52 AM

Ok, I know this is the dumbest question but I am only on day 2 of gluten free for my kids. I have all this frozen bread (Udis). I have never used frozen bread before. Can I thaw it out quick in the microwave or do I have to literally lay it out for a while? I don't need the whole loaf only a piece or two at a time. I keep reading to keep the bread in the refridgerator or freezer so I am not sure how to do this.
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#2 missmellie

 
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Posted 10 January 2012 - 10:04 AM

Ok, I know this is the dumbest question but I am only on day 2 of gluten free for my kids. I have all this frozen bread (Udis). I have never used frozen bread before. Can I thaw it out quick in the microwave or do I have to literally lay it out for a while? I don't need the whole loaf only a piece or two at a time. I keep reading to keep the bread in the refridgerator or freezer so I am not sure how to do this.


If you have frozen, already cooked, sliced bread, just remove the slices you need and thaw it on the counter, or in the gluten-free toaster, or microwave. If you're making a sandwich that won't be eaten for a while, don't bother to thaw it. It can thaw in the lunch box, or wherever. You might run into trouble separating the slices while they are frozen. Sometimes you need to break off a bigger "hunk" that what you actually need at the moment.

We all have to start learning someplace. :)
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#3 Darn210

 
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Posted 10 January 2012 - 11:09 AM

Couple seconds in the microwave wrapped in a paper towel. Flip it over and a few more seconds in the microwave. If I'm making a sandwich out of it, I let it come up to room temp while it is still in the paper towel (it absords the moisture.)
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#4 Takala

 
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Posted 10 January 2012 - 12:16 PM

There's no such thing as a dumb question, especially when the normal procedure for regular bread put in the refrigerator is the opposite, as refrigerated wheat bread molds quickly.

If you ever do your own gluten free baking, the higher protein type gluten free seeds such as amaranth are mold retardant. I've made dairy free, gluten free breads leavened with baking soda, with amaranth, potato, bean, almond base mixtures and experimented with how long I can leave them in the refrigerator without them going fuzzy, normal is at least 1 week to 9 days but I did have some buckwheat flatbreads make it to 2 weeks. B) Regular gluten-free rice based breads with yeast, left out on the counter at room temperature, especially if they have been previously frozen, go moldy much more quickly, so they should be frozen soon after purchase or baking.

Frozen cakes can also be thawed in the microwave, as well as baguettes, muffins and cupcakes, if you get a big batch of gluten free items and want to store them. Even corn tortillas can be frozen.
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#5 Wenmin

 
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Posted 10 January 2012 - 02:39 PM

I put the whole loaf in the refrigerator. I usually use it within a two week period. I have never had problems with it going bad in the refrigerator. When I need a slice, I toast it.

Wenmin
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#6 pricklypear1971

 
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Posted 10 January 2012 - 02:59 PM

I have decided I can put up with Rudi's regular if I want a slice of bread. I just toast it but at a lower setting, straight from the freezer. I find gluten-free breads burn easily on the toast setting.

For hamburger/hot dog buns I take them out when I start cooking, then I thaw in the micro 20 seconds at a time, wrapped in a damp paper towel. Otherwise they come out dry and hard. I heat them til they're barely warm then let them sit while I get everything else ready.
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#7 1974girl

 
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Posted 10 January 2012 - 03:07 PM

Thanks! I am sure I'll have a million other questions before this is all over! Now...on with the bread!
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#8 Cathey

 
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Posted 10 January 2012 - 04:27 PM

When I buy fresh bread (we only have Udi's available here) I put 2 slices in a ziplock sandwich bag and then back into the original bag it came in and freeze. It's easy to take a ziplock out each morning and defrost or toast. Just found a bakery 15 miles away and the loaf of bread is huge, I cut the slices in half. It all comes with time and what works for you, unfortunately it's all trial and error. Hope it works for you.
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#9 krystynycole

 
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Posted 10 January 2012 - 04:32 PM

I prefer it on toast than micro for taste preferences, but it all depends on your kiddos.
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#10 freeatlast

 
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Posted 11 January 2012 - 02:43 AM

I have decided I can put up with Rudi's regular if I want a slice of bread. I just toast it but at a lower setting, straight from the freezer. I find gluten-free breads burn easily on the toast setting.

I buy Rudi's multigrain and cinnamon raisin on a regular basis. I also toast by the slice, right out of the freezer, but *at a lower setting.*
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#11 xjrosie

 
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Posted 11 January 2012 - 06:30 AM

When I buy fresh bread (we only have Udi's available here) I put 2 slices in a ziplock sandwich bag and then back into the original bag it came in and freeze. It's easy to take a ziplock out each morning and defrost or toast. Just found a bakery 15 miles away and the loaf of bread is huge, I cut the slices in half. It all comes with time and what works for you, unfortunately it's all trial and error. Hope it works for you.
Cathey


I do the same thing, except I use wax paper to separate bread into sets of two slices, then shove as many as I can in a sandwich bag. That way, I put it all in the freezer and take out one sandwich bag at a time to put in the fridge. It saves a bit of money.
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#12 GFdad0110

 
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Posted 13 January 2012 - 01:00 PM

i've been eating gluten free my whole life and all ways put my bread directly from freezer into the toaster. It may require a butter knife to separate. Also if i plan on using it within a week i leave it in the fridge. I use "food for life" brown rice bread.
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