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Please Help Chronic Severe Insomnia


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#16 love2travel

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Posted 17 January 2012 - 10:10 AM

I can not imagine your pain. You have a much more severe case than I do. Thank you for responding. I have tried Ativan and a couple of other drugs that made me feel horribly depressed the next day. Trazodone worked for awhile, but not much anymore. Thanks for letting me know there's something available as a last resort. I wish you all the best.

It is not easy but I try to remain hopeful and positive (most days, at least!). Too bad that Ativan makes you feel so yucky. I have not yet tried Trazodone because I have heard mixed reviews on it. Maybe it would be worth a try for me. But this combination of muscle relaxants and analgesics seem to be helping me to sleep more but I feel so out of it during the day. I still feel that perhaps trying Zopiclone could really be of benefit to you. My doctors have assured me it is not habit forming (it is not for me).

All the best to you as well as you seek help. Remember there is ALWAYS hope. No matter what. :)
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<p>Confirmed celiac disease February 2011 from biopsies. Strictly gluten free March 18 2011.Diagnosed with fibromyalgia April 13 2011.3 herniated discs, myofascial pain syndrome, IT band syndrome, 2 rotator cuff injuries - from an accident Dec. 07 - resulting in chronic pain ever since. Degenerative disc disease.Osteoarthritis in back and hips.Chronic insomnia mostly due to chronic pain.Aspartame free May 2011.

When our lives are squeezed by pressure and pain, what comes out is what is inside.

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#17 newbietlh

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Posted 02 February 2012 - 10:46 AM

I am currently seeing a Naturopath (ND) for the same issue. So far, I've been tested for allergies, vitamin deficiencies and thyroid issues. All of which I have some of. I am also in the process of collecting saliva samples to test my reproductive hormone levels, cortisol and melatonin. What my treatment plan will end up being, I don't know, but I feel that each little bit of testing is helping. And I am here b/c my regular doctor and insurance wouldn't do the things I needed them to do and simply, didn't understand what I needed or how to do it. I've really had to do a lot of learning on my own and advocating for myself. I suggest two resources that should be a great help to you: The Hormone Diet, by Natasha Turner, ND and the website www.womentowomen.com. Both of these resources talk about the confluences of diet and bodily systems and make recommendations that our regular doctors normally overlook.

So, it could be anything that anyone above mentioned. It could be a combination of things. I just encourage you to think outside the box in terms of seeking help.

Also, as a psychologist, I understand the importance of knowing WHY you aren't sleeping and not just taking some pill to fix it. You start taking some sleeping pill and then you need more and more. If you understand why, you can at least address the root of the problem.

Lastly, I've tried Ashwaganda Root with some success. I took it at night with my calcium/mag supplements. That has really helped me get to sleep a lot better. I still have trouble staying asleep, though. But, I'm working on it!

Good luck to you!
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#18 newbietlh

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Posted 02 February 2012 - 10:54 AM

I second Learner01. The journal idea is helpful. Track water, food, supplements, bowel movements, aches and pains, exercise, sleep, weight, and anything else you can think of. I noticed a few patterns when I did that.

Also, the book I previously recommended, the Hormone Diet, will tell you when and how to get various hormones tested. My doctor didn't keep track of the time of the month, the WNL ranges were not current and he didn't do full panel testing. So, basically, the testing I got done through my regular MD was worthless. Hence my switch to an ND.
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#19 RiceGuy

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Posted 03 February 2012 - 09:06 AM

The recommendation of magnesium is worth pursuing, as is other nutrient deficiencies. Epsom salt baths are supposed to be helpful too, which is not surprising since Epsom salt is a form of magnesium.

For years I could not sleep well at all. Nothing seemed to help. That was before going gluten-free, but even afterward, sleep wasn't something which I could do effectively. But while addressing other issues, I started taking magnesium and a methylcobalamin (vitamin B12) sublingual tablet. It wasn't long before I was sleeping like never before! Haven't had any trouble sleeping since, and of course I continue the supplements, for that and other reasons.

Vitamin B12 (as well as other B vitamins and nutrients) are necessary for the brain to produce melatonin. And without melatonin, normal sleep/wake cycles are impacted if not impossible. The form I recommend is a sublingual methylcobalamin tablet (not a liquid), with a 5mg potency. Try taking it 60-90 minutes before bedtime. Source Naturals makes one which is gluten-free. You may need to take it more than once per day at first, if your levels are extremely low. Fortunately, B12 has no known level of overdose.

One important point is that blood tests cannot identify a B12 deficiency accurately. The body will rob B12 from organs and tissues in order to maintain the level in the blood. So by the time the blood shows a deficiency, your entire body can be depleted. The body can store vitamin B12 for many years, so it can take that long for symptoms to emerge. In other words, the underlying problem might have been ongoing for a long long time.

Regardless of what any tests say, I'd suggest a gluten-free diet, and the supplements. As was stated, getting tested for Celiac before going gluten-free is important, if you wish a formal diagnosis. But do keep in mind that even the best tests are not particularly accurate enough to rely on. So once you're satisfied that you've gotten all the tests you desire, try a gluten-free diet. The fact that other family members have Celiac says a lot.

Lastly, though I don't recommend this, I'll mention it since nobody else has of yet. There are melatonin supplements available, which you might find necessary at first. But do understand that if it helps, it may mean that your brain doesn't have the nutrients it needs to produce melatonin as it should. So you won't be addressing the real problem by taking melatonin, which will undoubtedly lead to other issues later.
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#20 peeptoad

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Posted 03 February 2012 - 12:21 PM

Lastly, though I don't recommend this, I'll mention it since nobody else has of yet. There are melatonin supplements available, which you might find necessary at first. But do understand that if it helps, it may mean that your brain doesn't have the nutrients it needs to produce melatonin as it should. So you won't be addressing the real problem by taking melatonin, which will undoubtedly lead to other issues later.


Can you give a little more information about this? I'm about to start taking sublingual melatonin because of chronic insomnia. Are the nutrients you're referring to simply magnesium and B12? I've taken magnesium before (250mg) and it gave me diarrhea, so I quit taking it. I even tried breaking the tablets in half and they still gave me problems. :(
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