Get email alerts Get Celiac.com E-mail Alerts  




Celiac.com Sponsor:
Celiac.com Sponsor:




Ads by Google:






   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

  • Announcements

    • admin

      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Hubby Causes Insomnia? Suggestions?
0

18 posts in this topic

Okay, I had started developing aches and pains and insomnia. Don't ask which came first, because I don't know...

Well, hubby travels frequently (but was home for December)....and left for a week long trip Monday.

Every day I have felt better. I have slept longer and deeper each day. I feel like a new person.

We both snore, but his snoring wakes me up, and evidently it bothers me even when I "sleep".

So, I bought some Breathe Right strips for him, and ear plugs for me. He's going to be just thrilled but I can't think of anything else...a friend suggested a mouth piece (works for her hubs -she has sleep issues when he snores).

Lack of sleep is contributing to so many aches, swelling in my hands, mental function and my daily functioning. I can't do it...

Any other suggestions?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Try an get him to sleep on his side. Easier said then done I know. I had to slide my hand flat under his back then make a fist. The uncomfortable feeling of having a fist in your back works instantly. Be ready to guide him unto his side.

If the snoring has been increasing over time, send him to the dentist. Some dental issues cause snoring.

I can't sleep without my husband's snoring. The dentist "fixed" something and he stopped snoring suddenly. I couldn't sleep and had to resort to leaving the t.v. on. :rolleyes:

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've done the side thing but he has a hard time (shoulder injury) AND he snores on his side (so do I).

We're quite the pair.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can try:

Get him to sleep on his side, a pillow with a neck support--it cradles the head and stops the snoring, a white noise machine--it works well for me.

Separate bedrooms ?(last resort)

I refused to do that--I like him next to me :)

My guy tends to snore if he flips on his back. I sympathize with you because I am such a light sleeper, I wake up if the guy down the road snores. :rolleyes:

We need our sleep!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The best thing both you and your husband could do, is to go and seek medical advice from your GP. As snoring is playing havoc with both your lives. Even though my parents sleep in their room, both of them wake me up during the night as well as my brother. They all snore and it is a real pain.

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The best thing both you and your husband could do, is to go and seek medical advice from your GP. As snoring is playing havoc with both your lives. Even though my parents sleep in their room, both of them wake me up during the night as well as my brother. They all snore and it is a real pain.

That would be great but I've found it goes something like dx'ing Celiac....

The mouth piece is what my hubs had a long time ago for teeth grinding..of course, he needed major dental work directly after he got it so it no longer fit. I have had mouth pieces suggested by doctors - the first things they suggest are side sleeping, allergies, devices, seperate beds...so it takes a while to arrive at new alternatives. Oh, and of course they want to give you pills.

I have considered requesting a sleep study.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have considered requesting a sleep study.

This certainly couldn't hurt. Snoring can sometimes accompany sleep-disordered breathing -- apnea, noctural desaturation, etc. (which can be hard on the heart) which a sleep study could diagnose and a CPAP or BiPAP mask could fix. Some people don't tolerate these well, but some find that their quality of sleep is dramatically better. I imagine it would increase the quality of your sleep, anyway -- it has to be easier to sleep through the hum of a CPAP unit than deal with frequent awakenings from snoring.

Good luck!

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My hubby used to snore loud enough to wake the dead, but even worse..he'd stop snoring. I'd nudge him and he'd make a snort and resume. It got really bad and I insisted he see the Dr. about it. It turned out he has severe sleep apnea. He now uses a CPap machine. It's like sleeping next to someone on a noisy ventilator. :blink:

I finally retreated to the guest room. My sleep improved quite a bit. We still "visit" each other, but sleep seperately.

I hope you find a solution.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We talked about it last night...

We're going to try the strips and earplugs and probably a mouth guard, and take it from there. He's open to more energy and if better sleep (less snoring) does it he's probably in board.

A CPAP would be difficult for frequent business travel, no?

He should be home in 2 hours! Yay!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A CPAP would be difficult for frequent business travel, no?

I don't know a lot about it, but I do know that they make CPAP machines specifically for travel that can also be used as the main home unit when not traveling.

It's great that you guys are able to talk about it. Hope the strips and mouth guard work! Glad he'll be home soon! :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had modest success with nasal strips and a product called Alkalol, an herbal liquid solution to flush the nostrils and sinuses. If you try it, be sure to buy the accessory "nasal douche cup" (no kidding). It seemed to soothe my inflamed sinuses, which was the primary cause of my snoring. It partly moderated my snoring, but not completely. Since going gluten-free my nasal Inflamation seems to have calmed down so I do not have to use it much any more. PS you may notice "caramel coloring" on the label. I confirmed with manufacturer that this was from corn and not wheat... Good luck and sweet dreams....

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My husband has a bad snoring issue and yes, it does mess with your own sleep. My hubby now has a specially fitted mouth piece. He first tested for sleep apnea and there was a slight issue but not enough to have to be hooked to machine at night. He tried the breathing strips, didn't work. I was sleeping with a pillow ovber my head but still many times would find myself trying for an hour to get him to stop sleeping and then I would have a time getting back to sleep. It didn't always have a spare room but I spent many nights sleeping on the couch.

I then found this ad for a mouth poiece and I bought it for him. IT WORKED! only thing is it shifted his bottom jaw forward and made his jaw ache the next morn so he went to the dentist. They fitted him with his own mouth piece to wear at night that has just the right tension and is built for his mouth. IT WORKS like a charm.

Alcohol will make the snoring worse so if he has anything to drink he now just sleeps in the spare room.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My husband snores terrible. He has had chronic sinus issues for a long time and had sinus surgery a few years back. Recently I convinced him to use a neti pot to irrigate. I've noticed he is snoring less. He also mentioned that he doen't have as much post nasal drainage and it is helping to relieve some of his "allergy" symptoms.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, we tried the strips last night. The snoring was bad at all - but some nights he's worse than others so who knows.

My earplugs fell out in the middle of the night...so I'll need different ones if they prove to be a solution.

I did wake up once - I think I was having a hot flash or had too many blankets. Couldn't go back to sleep easily so I turned in the tv for white noise and was out like a light.

I do notice I sleep in my side more when he's in the bed (even if I have plenty of room foot lay flat) and THAT isn't good since I wake up with a backache. And I wake up several times because of the backache...so it's a constant effort to remember to sleep on my back. We have a king size bed - cant get any more room (unless I kick the 80 lb dog off, but he jumps down after we all fall asleep, anyway).

I tried a nose strip, too. I woke up twice trying to rub it off. Finally took the stupid thing off.

So, overall not bad. Forgot to take my Claritin last night and I'm all stuffed up. Yuck.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hope you work out something that helps you both sleep better. Ear plugs didn't work for me. I need to be able to hear household noises like the phone, dogs, and what about the smoke alarm? :o

My hubby has a "home" CPap and a travel one, which is more compact. He travels for his job and goes to other countries. In Europe the airports really look the machine over to make sure it isn't some sort of explosive device. :lol:

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I sleep with earplugs myself, also due to my husband's incessant snoring. I swear it sounds like an army of chainsaw murderers coming to get me. I found that until I got used to earplugs I would take them out in my sleep. I still take one or both out some nights. It took some time to get the hang of getting them in just right, it's practically an art form. It's possible that you did the same rather than them falling out, but of course I've been known to be wrong. I use the pink ones called Sleep Pretty in Pink, they're fairly cheap at Wal-Mart.

We have also gone to the last resort of separate rooms, but he's so loud I still need earplugs. :lol:

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My fiances CPAP machine is pretty easy to travel with. It has a case that looks just like a lunch bag with a strap.

His would be medium sized though. He has a mouth and nose mask, and there's a smaller one just for your nose. However, especially with the mouth and nose combo, people often need/want to moisturize the air that's constantly blowing in your face, and that means a container of distilled water as well. They're also not cheap.

However, even if your hubby doesn't travel with it, it could still be worth having it at home. He should get tested for sleep apnea regarldess of how well you sleep though anyways...

Of course, that said, CPAP machines will only work properly for the type of sleep apnea where the person's airway gets blocked. There's another type the autonomic reaction to breathe is messed up, so even if the airway is open breathing might not happen. The vast majority of sleep apneas are actually a combination of both of these. My bf definitaly has a combination, although no one diagnosed him with that. But I can tell because his breathing is super shallow and terribly uneven, and then when he hasn't breathed for awhile he often gets a spasm and then starts to breathe again, and he does that even with the CPAP. It's the jostling that bothers me the most.

Honestly though, there's nothing wrong with sleeping separately, or at least trying it out. Nothing wrong with using the couch. You could even fall asleep next to him and then if/when you wake up, change to another bed or couch. Both my bf and I will do that on occasion. Doesn't say a thing about your relationship.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My parents went to separate rooms because they like about 10-degrees different temperatures at night and dad coughs a lot from allergies. They are both much happier. It's hard to have a happy and affectionate marriage when you're walking around sleep-deprived.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      102,669
    • Total Posts
      914,345
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Japan (Tokyo And Kyoto) Gluten Free
      i would  tend to agree with your mom and that comes from more than  30 years in and out of Japan. the  quality of the produce, meat and fish tends to be much better than the US  becsaue it gets to market  much faster and becasue there is a demand  for quality  above the demand for low price.  As it was pointed out, this  has  nothing to do with gluten.    There  are  alot of things you can  eat  in just about any restaurant  but there are things to learn like onigiri -- rice balls,  are seemingly innocent  but  90% of htem contain wheat starch.  most larger  grocery stores and  department store basements  you can  get  gluten free soy sauce. ---  most  chefs still assume that  soy sauce is soy  so never  take anyones  word for it when it comes to soy sauce. Of al the mixed  salads at  family mart, 7-11 and lawsons  only the gobo salad was  safe. good luck    
    • Gluten free backing food
      We are prepared for earthquakes at home, in our car and at work.  That means keeping tins of sardines, gluten-free cereal bars,  SPAM, nuts, chicken, fish, rice, etc. in our earthquake kits.  I have to go through it every three to four months to rotate out some of the foods (e.g. cereal bars).  I mark it in our planner.  It works for us.  Tasty?  Appetizing?  I bet my kid will be thankful to have food to eat in the event of an emergency.  
    • Blood sugar, hunger, celiac
      How much fat are you consuming?  Going lower carb and not adding in fats can make you hungry.   So, do you know that Type 1 diabetes is strongly linked to celiac disease?    I would ask your doctor for a GAD antibodies test to rule out type 1.   https://celiac.org/celiac-disease/celiac disease-and-diabetes/ http://www.celiac.nih.gov/CDandDiabetes.aspx   I basically eat to my meter and that translates to a Low Carb High Fat diet.  Keeps my doctor happy with my lab results! 
    • Lower left abdominal, left pelvic & other random pains
      VERY good point cyclinglady, very good point!!!!
    • Even gluten-free Foods Triggering Reaction After Initial Glutening?
      I was glutened in July.  Badly.  I have NO clue as to what got me.  I suspect two things 1) a gluten free store- brand, product that might have been mis-labeled and 2) a prescription generic medication (contacted the manufacturer to confirm a gluten-free status but got the old liability statement of no guarantees).  Both items were NEVER consumed by my gluten free hubby who acts as my canary.     I probably got glutened again by eating out while on vacation even though I only at at restaurants recommended by other celiacs.  The rest of the time I was at my parent's house and I have a dedicated kitchen there for us.   Who knows?  But I was sick with anxiety, tummy issues, vomiting, the works.  It was strange since anemia was my original symptom and I really did not have tummy issues at the time of my diagnosis.  So, celiac symptoms can evolve at least for me!  Six weeks after my first sign of a glutening, I was tested by my new GI because I was not getting well.  He thought I had SIBO or bile duct issues. I asked for celiac blood testing.    Turns out it was gluten all along!   During my glutening, I became lactose intolerant again, could only eat stewed foods because everything hurt to get through my digestive tract.   I was a basket case for three months.    Did I mention new problems resulting from my glutening?  Hives, itching, vomiting, passing out and tummy aches almost daily.  Anti-histamines helped.    My GP thinks I am her most "allergic" patient.  Except it was more like a histamine intolerance or a mast cell issue not allergies.   Who knows?  The hives eventually resolved as I healed from my glutening.    I refuse to test the two items that were suspect.    No way!    Three months later, I got dairy back.  Six months later I am eating gluten free anything....without any issues.  I also do not take any meds (except for Armour Thyroid) , supplements, eat out and I avoid even processed gluten-free items.  But, I feel great.     I suppose that I will eventually slip up and get glutened again.  But I am working hard not too.  I like feeling well.   So, really look to your diet.  I bet you just keep getting glutened.  Stick to whole foods, follow the FODMAP diet and wait.  Wait.  Wait.    
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Entries

  • Recent Status Updates

  • Who's Online (See full list)

    There are no registered users currently online

  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      59,686
    • Most Online
      1,763

    Newest Member
    Rene53
    Joined