Jump to content



   arrowShare this page:
   

   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

 
Ads by Google:
Celiac.com Sponsor:                                    


Photo
- - - - -

Stinky Gluten Free Bread


  • Please log in to reply
14 replies to this topic

#1 alwaysamazed

alwaysamazed

    New Community Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 07 February 2012 - 10:30 AM

Does anyone know why gluten free bread has a distinct weird smell to it? I bake homemade gluten free bread for my daughter and had tried several different recipes, but they all have that weird smell/taste. I am currently using Sorghum flour, rice flour, Tapioca starch/flour, and/or potato starch. I feel bad she has to eat this stinky stuff...
Any ideas would be appreciated!
  • 0

Celiac.com Sponsor:

#2 missmellie

missmellie

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 62 posts

Posted 07 February 2012 - 05:12 PM

Does anyone know why gluten free bread has a distinct weird smell to it? I bake homemade gluten free bread for my daughter and had tried several different recipes, but they all have that weird smell/taste. I am currently using Sorghum flour, rice flour, Tapioca starch/flour, and/or potato starch. I feel bad she has to eat this stinky stuff...
Any ideas would be appreciated!


I can't explain "stinky stuff". But, the ingredients you are using are not wheat flour. Nothing you make from them is going to smell like the aroma of wheat flour bread.
  • 0


Miss Mellie

Aug. 2010 IgA+ Gliadin; IgA+ Casein; IgA+ Egg; IgA+ Soy.
Sept. 2010 IgG+ for cow's milk, peach, yeast, chili pepper, egg white & yolk, lentil, soy, cola nut, coriander/cumin/dill, nutmeg/peppercorn, sesame seed, turkey, and wheat


Hypothyroidism, arthritis, GERD, overweight, chronic sleeping issues

#3 come dance with me

come dance with me

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 401 posts

Posted 07 February 2012 - 07:44 PM

I make bread and it smells and tastes fine. I bought bread, and it was in the fridge for a few days. The first time I opened it when we first bought it there was no bad smell to it, but a few days later I opened it again and for some reason it had the smell of bad wine, or fermented grapes. No wine or grapes, so I don't know what caused the smell but it hasn't happened when I have baked bread.
  • 0
Lord please give me patience, because if you give me strength, I may just beat the living crap out of someone...

#4 ptkds

ptkds

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 495 posts

Posted 08 February 2012 - 07:11 AM

It's probably the Sorghum. Try using rice flour instead. When I make bread, it doesn't smell or taste funny. It's not exactly like wheat bread, but the taste is good.

Hope this helps!!
  • 0

ptkds

Mom of 4 beautiful girls (the 2 youngest are only 10 months apart!)
Diagnosed with Celiac disease on November 8, 2006; gluten-free as of 12-1-06.

DD#2 13 years old; diagnosed on November 28, 2006. gluten-free as of 12-7-06.
DD#3 9 years old; diagnosed through blood work in October 2006. Gluten-free as of mid-November and doing GREAT!!
DD#4 8 years old; had a scope done on 6-22-07 (at 14 months old) and the dr saw stomach ulcers, but all test results were negative. GI dr told us to put her on the gluten free diet anyway. She is gluten free as of 6-22-07.


#5 DoggieMama

DoggieMama

    New Community Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts

Posted 05 June 2012 - 10:48 PM

I like you have a rank smell to the breads i have baked. i have tried all sorts of flours..and had no luck. I have used Oat bran, millet, brown rice, sorghum, buckwheat,almond, and coconut flours. all of them have the same smell...and darker in color when i know Brown rice flour isnt. i am thinking/wandering if it may be some ingredients causing it instead of the flour. but i dont know.. It tastes fine but it smells horrible. I have even added cinnamon just to mask the smell. its helped some but not enough for me. I love the smell of bread and this homemade stuff stinks.
I would love to know myself what the smell is.. I was googling about it and ended up at this comment...so i am new here.
  • 0

#6 Ginsou

Ginsou

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 346 posts

Posted 06 June 2012 - 11:17 AM

I like you have a rank smell to the breads i have baked. i have tried all sorts of flours..and had no luck. I have used Oat bran, millet, brown rice, sorghum, buckwheat,almond, and coconut flours. all of them have the same smell...and darker in color when i know Brown rice flour isnt. i am thinking/wandering if it may be some ingredients causing it instead of the flour. but i dont know.. It tastes fine but it smells horrible. I have even added cinnamon just to mask the smell. its helped some but not enough for me. I love the smell of bread and this homemade stuff stinks.
I would love to know myself what the smell is.. I was googling about it and ended up at this comment...so i am new here.


Are you perhaps smelling yeast? When I make a homemade gluten free bread, I can smell the yeast in it...but when I purchase commercial gluten free bread I do not notice the yeast smell.
  • 0

#7 DoggieMama

DoggieMama

    New Community Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts

Posted 06 June 2012 - 02:08 PM

Are you perhaps smelling yeast? When I make a homemade gluten free bread, I can smell the yeast in it...but when I purchase commercial gluten free bread I do not notice the yeast smell.



No, there isnt any yeast in this recipe. there is lemon juice, baking soda, xanthan gum, and some recipes have apple cider vinegar. both have had the same odor..with and without APV. i have changed up flours and everything. there are three things i have changed. i purchased a ceramic Paula Deen loaf pan flax seed flour and also I am letting the dough set..like the recipe calls for..for up to an hour..then stick into oven.
I cant imagine any of these affecting it. baffled..
  • 0

#8 Pac

Pac

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 156 posts

Posted 06 June 2012 - 02:55 PM

No, there isnt any yeast in this recipe. there is lemon juice, baking soda, xanthan gum, and some recipes have apple cider vinegar. both have had the same odor..with and without APV. i have changed up flours and everything. there are three things i have changed. i purchased a ceramic Paula Deen loaf pan flax seed flour and also I am letting the dough set..like the recipe calls for..for up to an hour..then stick into oven.
I cant imagine any of these affecting it. baffled..



Do you always use xanthan gum? I don't like the smell and taste of xanthan gum at all so that might be what you are smelling. When I use comercial gluten free mixes, they always have xanthan gum and they always have this weird smell and taste. Bread I make from plain flours smells good. If you use tapioca flour, I don't think you need the xanthan gum at all.
  • 0

#9 mamaw

mamaw

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,954 posts

Posted 06 June 2012 - 04:25 PM

Some gluten-free flours can become rancid & stink if not kept in fridge...
  • 0

#10 SensitiveMe

SensitiveMe

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 111 posts

Posted 06 June 2012 - 05:18 PM

Can you list every ingredient you are putting into the bread...maybe this will help those here figure out the problem. And I am wondering what oil you are using.

I have been making bread (in a bread machine) for 2 years and never did it smell stinky. I don't use sorghum though but brown rice flour, tapioca starch and potato starch. I don't keep them in the fridge...but I do keep the safflower oil I use to make the bread in the fridge because oils can get rancid.
I have changed from using xanthan gum to using guar gum and I will say I like guar gum better not only for taste but smell also. I changed because I couldn't get a straight answer as to what xanthan gum was made from other than from some rotting vegetable such as cabbage or corn. And since I found out I am also allergic (or sensitive) to corn I have stuck to using the guar gum.
  • 0

#11 psawyer

psawyer

    Moderator

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,030 posts

Posted 06 June 2012 - 05:54 PM

I changed because I couldn't get a straight answer as to what xanthan gum was made from other than from some rotting vegetable such as cabbage or corn.

If by the term "rotting vegetable" you mean that the process involves fermentation, you are correct.

But, to me, the term "rotting" in this context is rather inflammatory. By your usage, cider would be "rotting apples;" wine would be "rotting grapes;" and beer would be "rotting barley." I doubt many here would agree with those labels.
  • 0
Peter
Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000.
Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986
Markham, Ontario (borders on Toronto)

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

#12 SensitiveMe

SensitiveMe

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 111 posts

Posted 06 June 2012 - 06:34 PM

I am sorry if someone may take my usage of the words "rotting vegetables" as inflammatory. Actually I was quoting the exact words that were used on the packages of Bob's Red Mill Xanthan Gum where they were explaining how Xanthum was made as a myobacterium and they used the term "rotting vegetables such as cabbage" etc.

But that was 2 years ago and I have since noticed that there is no such wording now on the packages. I would agree that the term of rotting vegetables is not very pleasant and neither was the term myobacterium...and it's no wonder to me that they have now changed the packages to no longer say that. But I am sure their original intent was to explain in simple terms how xanthan gum was made. And sorry again if someone may have thought I was using inflammatory terms or criticizing xanthan gum.
  • 0

#13 Jestgar

Jestgar

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,755 posts

Posted 06 June 2012 - 06:46 PM

I am sorry if someone may take my usage of the words "rotting vegetables" as inflammatory. Actually I was quoting the exact words that were used on the packages of Bob's Red Mill Xanthan Gum where they were explaining how Xanthum was made as a myobacterium and they used the term "rotting vegetables such as cabbage" etc.

Seriously?? Wonder how long it took them to fire THAT marketing genius.
  • 0
"But then, in all honesty, if scientists don't play god, who will?"
- James Watson

My sources are unreliable, but their information is fascinating.
- Ashleigh Brilliant

Leap, and the net will appear.

#14 BPW in TO

BPW in TO

    New Community Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts

Posted 30 July 2012 - 07:50 AM

No, there isnt any yeast in this recipe. there is lemon juice, baking soda, xanthan gum, and some recipes have apple cider vinegar. both have had the same odor..with and without APV. i have changed up flours and everything. there are three things i have changed. i purchased a ceramic Paula Deen loaf pan flax seed flour and also I am letting the dough set..like the recipe calls for..for up to an hour..then stick into oven.
I cant imagine any of these affecting it. baffled..


My family is relatively new with the whole gluten free thing. We have recently started trying to bake bread. I also have a problem with the smell. Fortunately, my daughter doesn't notice it (She is the confirmed Celiac - my wife and I are awaiting blood tests). I find the smell to be mild when buying store bought bread, but severe when baking it myself. I recently made a loaf with new ingredients that was much worse. I was assuming that it was the corn flour, but you don't seem to be using that. (I based that on the fact that the last loaf seemed to have a higher corn percentage, including Masa Harina)

My next guess was the Apple Cider vinegar, but I guess that can't be right if you don't have that in all your recipes. The rest of your ingredients seem different, and the only common ingredient seems to be the xanthan gum. So, I think that's what I will try and change next time. I have had Guar gum, soghum flour and gelatin suggested - anyone have any comments?

I wish I could describe the smell. To me, it is extraordinarily foul and chemical like. I know I have a sensitive nose, but it is interesting that neither my wife nor my daughter seem to notice it.
  • 0

#15 JNBunnie1

JNBunnie1

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,326 posts

Posted 31 July 2012 - 04:11 AM

Seriously?? Wonder how long it took them to fire THAT marketing genius.

I know, right? HAHAHAH!!!!!
  • 0
If you're going through hell, keep going. ~Winston Churchill


0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Celiac.com Sponsors: