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Who's In Their 20's?
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36 posts in this topic

Hi,

I'm 26 and from Maryland. It has been hard adjusting to my gluten intolerance as well as other allergies. You'll find this to be a very helpful and supportive board.

Traci

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Hi there! I'm 25 and was dxed about 1 month ago. I'm a grad. student at ASU and it's hard to be gluten-free. All the parties, socials, gatherings...free pizza by the Greek rush ....it's not much fun to be on the outside of all the "fun" and normal stuff. I was thinking about seeing if there is gluten-free student support group on campus, or maybe looking in to starting one? I mean, what do students stuck in the dorms eat when they buy a meal plan? Hang in there...I'm making all my own foods from scratch and it is a pain and does take a lot of time...but they taste good! I chewed my husband out the other day for eating my home-made gluten-free granola bars when we have a pantry full of the store bought ones...he said he liked mine better! Lol!

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It's nice to know that there are others out there that are young and living gluten free (or trying the best we can!). I've never met anyone with celiac disease so it makes me feel better to know that there are others like me :)

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I just turned 30 a few months ago (ok, 7 seven months ago).

I have been diagnosed since 1997.

The first couple of years were difficult, but they got easier.

You should always be reading about celiac disease and always be reading about food. I have plenty of cookbooks and food-educational sources at home. The more knowledge the better.

This site is great, better than any Doctor I have ever seen. Welcome!

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Hey everyone, my name is Ken and I'm 24 years old. I was diagnosed in October, and had been getting sick for about 5 years previously. I'm new to all this posting stuff, but I wanted to hear from more people my age that have this disease. GFSTUDENT, if you allow your body some time to heal; there's a good chance that you will be able to tolerate more foods in the future. Eating a very restrictive diet for a limited time is a small price to pay if it buys you years of health in the future. As someone else posted (I forget who), dealing with eating out with friends is a difficult situation for me. My friends will laugh when I bring my cooler of food on the golf course, as they're all toating their coolers of beer, but oh well. A quick note to everyone.. I recently returned from Disney World, which was the first vacation I have taken since being on the diet, and I would definitely recommend it to anyone. As long as you make all the reservations with advance notice and alert them to your restrictions, they were more than accomodating. Each head chef came over to talk to me, which made the trip a lot less stressful for me (and therefore my girlfriend). I'm living outside of Philly, so anyone in the area email me or post back... i haven't met anyone aside from 50 year olds with this, so it will be nice to talk to someone more my age.

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I'm 27 and was diagnosed with celiac disease slightly over a year ago, but I've had signs of it since infancy.

I'm in my twenties, too. I think people our age are more open to the idea of food causing illness, compared to my grandparents' generation. I think it's because there's more awareness now that not everything can be solved with a "suck it up, get over it, and move on" --type attitude. You know, the mentality that says, "if I don't see gushing blood, you're just fine." Has anyone else noticed this? In my experience, when I tell someone 30 years older than me what celiac disease is, I'm much more likely to get a skeptical reaction than if I tell someone my own age.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Yes, I've had a similar reaction even though I had most of the same health issues (and more) as the middle aged people I'd encounter. I was also told, "You're young; you'll bounce back from anything" repeatedly pre-diagnosis. I still haven't bounced back.

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I'm living outside of Philly, so anyone in the area email me or post back

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Hey Ken - I'm in grad school at Drexel!

Do you ever visit Mr. Ritts in Philly?

- Lauren

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Hey Ken - I'm in grad school at Drexel!

Do you ever visit Mr. Ritts in Philly?

- Lauren

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Hey Lauren - I've been to Mr. Ritts a couple of times. Their jewish apple cake is ridiculously good. what are you going to school for? i graduated from jefferson last year.

ken

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Ken,

I'm getting my masters in Publication Management. I have my bachelors in Rhetoric & Communications. For one of my grad classes last year, I "created" a magazine entirely about Celiac disease and the gluten-free diet :P

I think EVERYTHING at Mr. Ritts is ridiculously good! I'll have to try the apple cake next time. I got my birthday cake from them last year (my only request was that it had to have chocolate and it had to have peanut butter) and they came up with something that was to die for :D

It's cool to find out about others my age with celiac disease! And you're all so nice!

- Lauren

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I'm in my (late) 20's as well, but I have to say that I haven't had too much trouble with people regarding celiac disease overall. My husband's family have really been the only ones to have a strange reaction ("can't she just take some benadryl?").

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Welcome! I'm 27 (will be 28 in just over a week). I just found out a couple months ago that I have celiacs, but have most likely had it for nearly 10 years. Atleast now I know why I was always sick.

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    • You are right, the tests could be invalid.   All the celiac tests require you to be on a gluten-containing diet.  It is up to you to decide if you want to go gluten free.  You can do it.  Believe me, I know.  Hubby is not officially diagnosed.  He went gluten-free 15 years ago, based on the rather poor advice from my allergist and his GP.  It worked though.  But he would be the first to tell you that I have had way more support in terms of family and medical.    We think he has it.  Both of our families are riddled with autoimmine disorders.  I am the first to be diagnosed.   My Aunt went gluten free per the advice of her Chiropractor.  Her other doctors never suspected celiac disease.  The diet obviously worked for her.  Her daughter (my cousin) is a nurse.  She had an endoscopy but they did not check for celiac disease.  She chose to go gluten-free too since it worked for her mom.  Both will not do a gluten challenge.  However, my diagnosis has helped them get proper medical treatment.  My Aunt is very active in a celiac support group.    Now everyone in my family knows about celiac disease.  My own niece was just diagnosed with Crohn's, but her GI did test and will continue to test her for celiac disease.  You can develop additional autoimmune disorders at any time.   So far, a few other members have been tested.  No one else had had a celiac disease diagnosis yet.  Time will tell.  If I can save someone from the misery of struggling to get a diagnosis, then I can feel good.   Now, an official diagnosis will help you adhere to the diet .  You can get follow-up care.  Get checked for other things like SIBO, H. Pylori and cancer.  But ultimately, it is up to you.   Whatever you decided to do, please consider a family health history chart.  You might someday help a grandchild.   The stool tests?  In all my research, leading celiac experts do not recommend them.  http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/faq/why-dont-you-recognize-tests-stool-tests-or-otherwise-for-gluten-sensitivity-that-are-currently-available-through-companies-like-enterolab-or-cyrex/ gene testing?  Some 30% of the poulation carries the celiac genes.  It just tells you that you have the chance to develop celiac disease.  It can not diagnose you.    
    • The procedure is a breeze. You will go in, be sedated and go to sleep for a short nap and then it's over. Some people will have a bit of a sore throat but not everyone does. For me the hardest part of the endo was not being able to drink coffee when I got up. You seem to have been back on gluten for long enough to have the test but as CLady said there is a good chance your blood work may be negative. In your case you may want to continue eating gluten after the biopsy at least until you get your blood results. If they are negative consider going a bit longer and getting them redone.
    • I think the gene tests are accurate.  Not sure if thier interpretation of them is.   If you actually think have Celiac, you need to know that.  You  need to know how careful you must be.  You need a diagnosis to get gluten-free food in hospitals or nursing homes (if you can find one that does gluten-free food).  Because thsese "stool tests" are not medically accepted, it is unlikely that a real medical facility will consider you to have Celiac.   http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/faq/why-dont-you-recognize-tests-stool-tests-or-otherwise-for-gluten-sensitivity-that-are-currently-available-through-companies-like-enterolab-or-cyrex/
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