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Baffled By Little Caesars Pizza


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14 replies to this topic

#1 Loch

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Posted 07 February 2012 - 08:21 PM

I just signed up here because a questions be gnawing at me and I can't seem to find any answers. This seemed the best category to post under but if there is better please point me to it. I'm just a bit gluten sensitive while my mom has celiacs. She can have some pretty bad reactions within minutes of even small cross contamination. I'm not as strict with my diet as I should be and occasionally will eat quick food with gluten while out with friends.

From me straying from time to time I found that I never had any symptoms after eating Little Caesar Pizza. This was still shortly after my mom was diagnosed and I started to pay more attention to how I feel after I eat different food. So my mom, still dearly missing some gluteny foods, tried a slice after I told her how I thought it was odd as other pizza will wreak havoc on me. It's been awhile and we've return to that same Little Caesars multiple times and neither of us have had any noticeable problems from eating it.

My questions would be any ideas why something so obviously made with wheat, says so on their website, wouldn't give us problems(in my moms case acid reflex, nausea, fever, cramps, vomiting, and other intestinal distress), and can continuing to eat them still prove to be harmful?

TL:DR
Why would someone with celiac not be bothered by Little Caesars Pizza?
Can it still be harmful?
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#2 kwylee

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Posted 08 February 2012 - 01:03 PM

I have tested negative for Celiac as well, but I did test positive on another showing that my body was producing antibodies to gluten, which means that for years prior to my antibody test, my body would be on the defensive anytime I ingested gluten in any amount. I had become lightheaded all day every day, but gluten intolerance manifests in many ways and the symptoms can vary drastically one person to the next. Gluten can create systematic inflammation internally and lead to many diseases and autoimmune conditions too numerous to list here, not the least of which is Celiac, MS, Lupus, RA, diseases of the skin and thyroid, cancer, and in my case, attack of the brain and nervous system.

That slice of gluten filled pizza is doing harm to your mother's body, and if you feel like you are sensitive, chances are you could wind up like me as well. I ate it for 55 years before I found out what was making me dizzy and scared. Luckily, I found out in time to take it out of my diet and recover. But if people who are poisoned by gluten continue to ingest it, the outcome will not be as happy. Please consider all of this, especially the next time you let your mom take just one piece, it's just not worth it.
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K Wylee

Gluten Intolerant, Positive test, June 2010
Casein sensitivity, Positive test, June 2010
Reactive to soy, most processed foods & preservatives, June 2010

#3 xjrosie

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Posted 08 February 2012 - 06:03 PM

My two daughters diagnosed with Celiac had no symptoms whatsoever. It just happened to show up on routine blood tests for my younger daughter who has diabetes. When they did the scope, it was severely affected by the gluten. So just because you don't feel anything doesn't mean it's not doing any harm.

I don't know what is in your area, but I'm sure there are other pizza places that could have gluten free offerings? Here in Michigan, we have Passport Pizza and Dan Good Pizza - both are knowledgeable about CC and Celiac too.
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#4 Korwyn

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Posted 09 February 2012 - 03:39 AM

Do they have a sourdough crust? And if so is that the crust you are eating?
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Undiagnosed for 20 years since first symptoms.
March 2009 - Negative Blood work
April 24, 2009 - Gluten-free
April 29, 2009 - Notably positive response to gluten-free Diet.
May 2, 2009 Dairy Free
May 6, 2009, Soy Free
May 27, 2009 Enterolab Results: Positive Anti-gliadin IgA, tTG IgA, Casein, HLA DQ2.2, HLA DQ8
June 4, 2009 Refined sugar free (except Raw Honey, pure Maple syrup)
June 29, 2009, Dad diagnosed Celiac by GI specialist via blood work and dietary response.
July 2009, Dad's gene test: double DQ8! Thanks Dad - I'll try to get you something nice for Christmas! :)
August 8, 2009 Really Soy free this time - Thanks Blue Diamond for the soy lecithin in the almond milk! :(

#5 Takala

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Posted 09 February 2012 - 07:31 AM

No, I looked up online what sort of crust they used and found a discussion forum of pizza makers talking about it, they use a high gluten flour, yeast, and a slow, cold rise:
http://www.pizzamaki...hp?topic=1515.0

Agree that both of them should knock it off with encouraging the other one the regular pizza consumption.
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#6 Loch

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Posted 09 February 2012 - 06:22 PM

Thank you for the replies. I figured it could be harmful, at the least I knew it wasn't healthy. I should do more research. I really don't get the lack of symptoms for just one thing. I can't think of anything else I've eaten with gluten that I don't get sick on anymore.

It's really not a good reason but we are a busy and poorish family. Everything seems to make a steep jump in price if it has the words "Gluten Free" on them.

There are some local pizza places that offer gluten free pizza, but there seems to be little care or thought made to eliminated cross contamination. Getting sick on one places pizza. They said they only have one stove so that's where we figure the problem is. They say that it's more targeted at people making a dietary choice and not for people with an allergy. I've read that currently people can call their product gluten free even if there is a risk of cross contamination. While the other place it just of miserable quality.
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#7 sa1937

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Posted 10 February 2012 - 05:07 AM

Loch, welcome to the forum! You definitely need to give up your Little Caesars pizza. Why don't you start making your own? It'll be so much better, not to mention safe, and it's really not that difficult. It just takes a little practice. Plus you can choose whatever toppings you like. Check out The Pizza Crust Thread to find lots of recipes. You could become the pizza-making expert in the family!!! Posted Image
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Endoscopy with Positive Biopsy - April 9, 2010
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#8 GFinDC

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Posted 10 February 2012 - 09:09 AM

Good idea SA. Loch, Kinickinick makes gluten-free pizza crusts. You can find them in the freezer section of stores.
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Proverbs 25:16 "Hast thou found honey? eat so much as is sufficient for thee, lest thou be filled therewith, and vomit it."
Job 30:27 My bowels boiled, and rested not: the days of affliction prevented me.
Thyroid cyst and nodules, Lactose / casein intolerant. Diet positive, gene test pos, symptoms confirmed by Dr-head. My current bad list is: gluten, dairy, sulfites, coffee (the devil's brew), tea, Bug's Bunnies carrots, garbanzo beans of pain, soy- no joy, terrible turnips, tomatoes, peppers, potatoes, and hard work. have a good day! :-) Paul

#9 sa1937

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Posted 10 February 2012 - 09:19 AM

Good idea SA. Loch, Kinickinick makes gluten-free pizza crusts. You can find them in the freezer section of stores.

I bet homemade is even better!!! Posted Image
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Sylvia
Positive Celiac Blood Panel - Dec., 2009
Endoscopy with Positive Biopsy - April 9, 2010
Gluten Free - April 9, 2010

#10 love2travel

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Posted 10 February 2012 - 09:39 AM

I bet homemade is even better!!! Posted Image

I'm with you, Sylvia! FAR better. :D
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<p>Confirmed celiac disease February 2011 from biopsies. Strictly gluten free March 18 2011.Diagnosed with fibromyalgia April 13 2011.3 herniated discs, myofascial pain syndrome, IT band syndrome, 2 rotator cuff injuries - from an accident Dec. 07 - resulting in chronic pain ever since. Degenerative disc disease.Osteoarthritis in back and hips.Chronic insomnia mostly due to chronic pain.Aspartame free May 2011.

When our lives are squeezed by pressure and pain, what comes out is what is inside.

#11 sa1937

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Posted 10 February 2012 - 09:43 AM

I'm with you, Sylvia! FAR better. :D

My son-in-law even makes gluten-free pizza as my daughter is also celiac. She says it's even better than the best gluten-free pizza they've had in Denver...and Denver is a gluten-free haven.
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Sylvia
Positive Celiac Blood Panel - Dec., 2009
Endoscopy with Positive Biopsy - April 9, 2010
Gluten Free - April 9, 2010

#12 ndw3363

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Posted 10 February 2012 - 10:08 AM

I understand money is a problem that makes this diet difficult sometimes. That is why you have to learn to cook - I'm lucky in that I love to do it. But I know some people don't. Unfortunately, in order to have variety and a healthy diet, it's necessary at times. I hardly ever buy anything that is specifically labeled GLUTEN FREE. I buy chicken, pork, beef, frozen vegetables, rice, really good dark chocolate (my splurge), and other things. I found that I don't care for a lot of gluten free substitutes - so I just eat things that would naturally be gluten free anyway - that way I don't have to substitute. But boy do I miss pizza - so I do feel your pain. I slipped once...I was on vacation in FL in Nov, and someone ordered a pizza. I had at it. Felt great the whole rest of the trip. However about a week later, I was exhausted, short of breath, the tingling in my legs came back, my anxiety took over, and I didn't want to leave the house. So just because I didn't feel bad after I ate that pizza, doesn't mean that it didn't kick my butt for making a bad choice. Still a struggle to make smart choices every day (and I've been gluten-free for a year) - but one day at a time right? haha - spoken like true carbohydrate addict. :D
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#13 dsbsnag

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Posted 17 September 2012 - 10:45 AM

You've got to keep in mind that not all of your reactions are going to be physical. Trust me you are reacting to this -- whether you feel it or not. Do some googling on "silent celiac disease".

This gluten goes from the gut to your brain. It may not be manifesting itself physically; but, trust me it is neurologically.
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#14 ravenwoodglass

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Posted 23 September 2012 - 08:02 AM

You've got to keep in mind that not all of your reactions are going to be physical. Trust me you are reacting to this -- whether you feel it or not. Do some googling on "silent celiac disease".

This gluten goes from the gut to your brain. It may not be manifesting itself physically; but, trust me it is neurologically.

Welcome to the board. Very wise words for a first post.
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Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

#15 joelmw

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Posted 24 September 2012 - 09:15 AM

You've got to keep in mind that not all of your reactions are going to be physical. Trust me you are reacting to this -- whether you feel it or not. Do some googling on "silent celiac disease".

This gluten goes from the gut to your brain. It may not be manifesting itself physically; but, trust me it is neurologically.


I just want to loudly second this.

I was diagnosed with celiac disease almost exactly a year ago. Frankly, since I've been gluten-free, I am not sure when I specifically get "glutened" but I can tell you for sure that the cumulative impact of gluten was devastating--extreme fatigue, brain fog, cramps--and quantifiable. I showed marked improvement within a couple of weeks and wouldn't dream of taking the chance that I'd go back to how I was feeling before changing my diet--not to mention the untold consequences that I didn't notice.

One of things that troubles me most on these forums is hearing folks suggest with confidence that a food isn't affecting them because they didn't have a noticeable physical reaction. I think it's kinda cool that they can sometimes be so sure, but extremely dangerous to assume that they will always know. There are just too many variables and our body's systems are too complex for me to take such claims seriously.

Gluten is poison. I'd no sooner eat something with gluten in it than chew on d-con or drink a cocktail made with paint thinner.

I agree that gluten-free often equals expensive, but I find that that's typically because folks are trying to eat "substitute" foods. I'm not gonna say I don't occasionally enjoy some gluten-free pizza, but for the most part I avoid grains altogether, concentrating on vegetables and meat. I know it's a personal thing, but I don't really miss the bread and can certainly live without doughy products.
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