Jump to content

Follow Us:  Twitter Facebook RSS Feed            




   arrowShare this page:
   

   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

 
Celiac.com Sponsor:                                    


Photo
- - - - -

How Long Does It Take For Skin To Clear Up?


  • Please log in to reply

25 replies to this topic

#16 oakpoint9

 
oakpoint9

    New Community Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 13 posts
 

Posted 07 September 2005 - 11:08 AM

The doctor diagnosed it as a fungal infection.  I am treating the rash with antifungal cream.  I bought the store brand (tocopheral may have been the active ingredient", then got a coupon for Lamisil brand name and bought that.  Basically you just buy the athlete's foot medicine.  I used the powder first and switched to the cream this time.  The lamasil should work in two weeks per directions, where the store brand took four weeks per directions.  Doctor can also prescribe oral antifungal...the creepy comercial with the little cartoon dermadaphyte under the toenail...if the fungus needs to be treated aggresively.

The reason I read is that because our skin is weak, it is prone susceptible to the fungal infection.  We can get it anywhere we have the open sores or poor skin quality.  Mine happens to be the worst on my hands.  My mother has an aggressive spot on her ankle.  My sister has one on her leg and arm.  My other sister has it on the top of her foot.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


So your family members are all DH? I have tried to get y sisters to test, but to no avail.
Thanks for you help, I think that I have Lamasil at home.
  • 0

Celiac.com Sponsor:

#17 polishprincess

 
polishprincess

    New Community Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
 

Posted 07 September 2005 - 11:17 AM

Family doesn't really admit to having it, but they know it makes them feel better when they do gluten-free. Two sisters are very strong supporters. We all have both the GI and skin. The GI makes it obvious that you have it, especially when the food goes right through you, followed my the mind fog. My poor mother has had a rash on her leg for over 40 years. It is horrible. She is just now trying to be gluten-free. She fights it and eats bad food and then gets very sick, starts to forget things and begins to itch the rash. Same with my sisters. I suffered the worst and the longest. I am over my desire for gluten foods. But the day they come out with a magic pill I am eating a Big Mac:)
  • 0

#18 oakpoint9

 
oakpoint9

    New Community Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 13 posts
 

Posted 07 September 2005 - 02:23 PM

Me too!!!
Mom past away with ovarian cancer. Had DH for 25 yrs. cheated all the time.
I beleive that the two were related. She did not have the options that we have today.
She was never test for Celiac, I do not think the doctors had a clue.
Took me 3 years to determine that my rashes were DH, no doctor even mentioned the possiblity. If I did not know about her "allergy" I would still be a mess.
Thanks for the ear.
  • 0

#19 tarnalberry

 
tarnalberry

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,542 posts
 

Posted 07 September 2005 - 03:34 PM

DH, from what I understand, can take months to clear. You may want to eliminate as much iodine from his diet at the moment as well, as that can make the DH worse (and last longer).

The dry skin is almost certainly exacerbating things, and I presume you've tried all the various things like moisturizing lotions or even directly using almond oil and increasing the amount of fat in his diet, so I'm don't have any other creative ideas! (Oh, maybe the oil in the bathwater thing. If you put him in a warm bath, then after 10 minutes, add a bit of bath oil (any pure oil will do), let him soak another 10 minutes, then pat dry, it can help. It's important to get those 10 minutes in without the oil first, though.)
  • 0
Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"
Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy
G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004
Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me
Bellevue, WA

#20 Connie37

 
Connie37

    New Community Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts
 

Posted 07 September 2005 - 04:25 PM

Hi Everyone,

I guess I need some reassurance here.  Our 5 year old son was diagnosed with celiac about 6 weeks ago and we removed gluten and dairy and eggs from his diet.  We've noticed a change in his mood... he seems to be more energetic and less moody.  He's happier.  But his skin still looks awful.

I should say that his skin did improve in the sense that the little sores have gone away.  So that's good.  But he still scratches constantly and that tears up his skin, so he's bleeding all the time.  His skin is DRY-DRY-DRY and red and inflamed all over his arms and legs.

We have been as vigilant as we know how to be.  We make most of his food from scratch and I read labels diligently on all products.  If he's getting accidental exposure then it's got to be miniscule.  Our other son has a peanut allergy, so we're used to read labels and providing alternative treats.  We have not slacked off.

Does it just take a long time for the skin to heal?  I am so tired of people comment on how bad he looks.  We have been working so hard to keep gluten out of his diet that it would be nice if we saw more results.

Thanks,

Carrie

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


  • 0

#21 Connie37

 
Connie37

    New Community Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts
 

Posted 07 September 2005 - 04:26 PM

Hi Everyone,

I guess I need some reassurance here.  Our 5 year old son was diagnosed with celiac about 6 weeks ago and we removed gluten and dairy and eggs from his diet.  We've noticed a change in his mood... he seems to be more energetic and less moody.  He's happier.  But his skin still looks awful.

I should say that his skin did improve in the sense that the little sores have gone away.  So that's good.  But he still scratches constantly and that tears up his skin, so he's bleeding all the time.  His skin is DRY-DRY-DRY and red and inflamed all over his arms and legs.

We have been as vigilant as we know how to be.  We make most of his food from scratch and I read labels diligently on all products.  If he's getting accidental exposure then it's got to be miniscule.  Our other son has a peanut allergy, so we're used to read labels and providing alternative treats.  We have not slacked off.

Does it just take a long time for the skin to heal?  I am so tired of people comment on how bad he looks.  We have been working so hard to keep gluten out of his diet that it would be nice if we saw more results.

Thanks,

Carrie

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


  • 0

#22 Connie37

 
Connie37

    New Community Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts
 

Posted 07 September 2005 - 04:36 PM

[quote name='Connie37' date='Sep 7 2005, 07:25 PM']

I am new also. My daughter is newly diagnosed. They took several biopsys of her skin and the Mayo clinic give us the results.

One of the newest things we are learning is the possibility of contamination in all the cookware and plastic ware. We just gave away most everything.

The microscopic size of gluten contaminates the finest scrape or scratch in your dishes, pots or bowls.

I learned this from reading other celiacs who are sharing their experiences.

You might want to ask some other people. Another place we looked was at the car seat and high chair of her children. They had bits of crackers in them.

I know how difficult it is to watch your child suffer, but I know it will improve. We are still struggling with the outbreaks.

Some of the vanilla flavoring may be our problem. We don't know if the alcohol in vanilla is a potential problem.

After we got rid of the cookware, her rashes cleared immediately (in about 7 days) for a short time then something went wrong.
  • 0

#23 carrielynn

 
carrielynn

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 64 posts
 

Posted 12 September 2005 - 02:32 PM

I am new also. My daughter is newly diagnosed.  They took several biopsys of her skin and the Mayo clinic give us the results.

One of the newest things we are learning is the possibility of contamination in all the cookware and plastic ware.  We just gave away most everything.

The microscopic size of gluten contaminates the finest scrape or scratch in your dishes, pots or bowls.

I learned this from reading other celiacs who are sharing their experiences.

You might want to ask some other people.  Another place we looked was at the car seat and high chair of her children.  They had bits of crackers in them.

I know how difficult it is to watch your child suffer, but I know it will improve.  We are still struggling with the outbreaks.

Some of the vanilla flavoring may be our problem.  We don't know if the alcohol in vanilla is a potential problem.

After we got rid of the cookware, her rashes cleared immediately (in about 7 days) for a short time then something went wrong.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Our son's skin got better briefly too, then got bad again. I am hitting my head against the wall, have checked everything he ingests. Our doctor said it will just take awhile for his skin to heal (6 months or more). But poor little buddy! He looks AWFUL today. I have to say his skin seems to get worse when there is more ragweed in the air (and it's at a high level here), so I'm thinking (and hoping) it's the ragweed allergy and not that he accidentally got gluten. (Not that I want him to have an allergic reaction... you know what I mean.)

I'm sure his immune system is pretty reactive, given everything he's gone through.

I did check our vanilla and don't think that's the problem.

We got new dishes. We're using metal pots and pans. I don't want to give those away and hope they aren't contaminating his food. If that's the case, we won't ever be able to leave the house and eat at anyone else's house and he won't ever be able to live in dormitory in college. (Don't really want to go down that path.) We haven't cooked wheat type foods in them anyway.

Oh well, we'll keep plugging away and hoping that it gets better. Thanks for your thoughts.

Carrie
  • 0

#24 LauraZ

 
LauraZ

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 28 posts
 

Posted 11 October 2005 - 06:56 PM

Carrie,
My heart goes out to you. You just want your kids to have the same options as other kids, but we know that they simply can't. My kids are getting used to packing their own gluten-free cupcake or brownie when they go to someone's bd party; they know they have to turn down classroom treats. They are also dairy intolerant, so Halloween, with all that milk chocolate, is going to be hard. You are doing such a good job with your vigilance and your quest for knowledge on behalf of your kids. Good for you.

I will throw one more oil into the mix here, which I haven't seen mentioned... Emu oil. I had a patch of eczema on the back of my leg as I was going gluten-free. Itched like crazy. Put emu oil on it and after the very first application I got relief and a visible diminishing of the red scaliness. I used it on my eczema as my other symptoms were clearing and now that I have been gluten-free about 10 weeks, the eczema is almost all gone. I used the oil for 2-3 weeks until the diet finally took hold.

Best of luck to you!
Laura
  • 0
gluten-free 7/27/05

"Good judgment comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgment."

#25 Drew

 
Drew

    New Community Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 11 posts
 

Posted 12 October 2005 - 08:47 PM

We got new dishes.  We're using metal pots and pans.  I don't want to give those away and hope they aren't contaminating his food.  If that's the case, we won't ever be able to leave the house and eat at anyone else's house and he won't ever be able to live in dormitory in college.  (Don't really want to go down that path.)  We haven't cooked wheat type foods in them anyway.

Carrie

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


I am afraid that may be exactly the case. Almost every single time I go to eat at another persons house or eat at a restaurant I get an accidental dose of gluten. This happens no matter how careful they try to be or how scrupulously I check the ingredients.

If you do not want to get rid of your pots and pans, perhaps you could get one pan and one pot to cook for your son in. And at least for the first year or so, yes have him eat only food from home. He can bring it with him if you must go to eat at someone elses house. In time with healing you may not have to be quite so careful but for now it is essential for your sons health. Good Luck.
  • 0

#26 VegasCeliacBuckeye

 
VegasCeliacBuckeye

    Advanced Community Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,236 posts
 

Posted 14 October 2005 - 01:29 PM

I have had DH since I was diagnosed (1997).

It is nowhere near as bad as the first 2 years, however, it still comes up -- especially if I do not take Dapsone every other day or so....

Problem is, I eat out 2-5 times a week, so it is going to happen no matter how careful I am...

For occasions at friends houses, I always have aluminum foil in the car (for BBQ purposes) and I always bring chips that I can have/like.

The DH will eventually clear up (especially with the assistance of Dapsone), but it takes time -- his body will take a while to clear up the "histamine" reaction it has had for the past several years -- Rome wasn't built in a day.

I also used Fluoconide (a steroid cream when I was first diagnosed) -- it helped the bad areas (joints, eyes, beltline, etc)

Things will improve as long as he is is eating well (no gluten, lots of veggies, lots of fruit)....

Oh, and sometimes execise and sunlight make the DH worse -- I don't know why..
  • 0




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Celiac.com Sponsors: